Data Archiving Solutions - Compliance Information Archiving | Proofpoint US

System info: Archives

System info: Archives

make up an Open Archival Information System (OAIS). ISO 20652:2006 Space data and information transfer systems—Producer-Archive. AtoM stands for Access to Memory. It is a web-based, open source application for standards-based archival description and access in a multilingual, multi-. txt file and included in the created archive. To submit the archive to Global Technical Support, provide the required Upload Information. YaST automatically. System info: Archives

Interesting. You: System info: Archives

System info: Archives
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Enterprise Information Archiving

Optimize operations by delivering content in the context of business processes

The OpenText™ Extended ECM Platform pioneered the concept of extending content management best practices into the industry lead applications that drive business processes, such as SAP, Salesforce and Microsoft. Building on that expertise, OpenText provides a class-leading, flexible development approach—providing the tools, APIs and templates needed to create customized integrations to virtually any application for:

  • Enhanced information flows with current lead systems and better business outcomes using existing IT investments
  • Maximized process and operational efficiencies through automation, identification, classification, analysis and distribution of System info: Archives productivity and user experiences with seamless instant access to information for improved employee insights
  • Better information governance and content control across the entire organization
  • Minimized development cycles to free up IT resources for higher-level strategic purposes

Establish consistent and defensible Information Governance across the business

Enterprise information is growing at an exponential rate, where business applications are moving from System info: Archives desktop to a variety of mobile devices and where information itself resides anywhere—in the cloud or on–premises. The firewall is no longer the "boundary" of the business, making it harder than ever to enforce information management policies and ensure compliance.

Companies everywhere are realizing the value that an Information Governance initiative can have for their business—in more ways than one. With the amount of information growing at an exponential rate, new regulations and policies are constantly coming into effect, and this has increased both the need for, and value of, Information Management.

Best practices and solutions that help meet compliance and risk mitigation mandates imposed by law, regulators, or internal quality standards are complemented by a keen focus on developing ways to capitalize on the kinds of productivity and efficiency ProtonVPN 1.12.0 keygen Archives that grow out of an asset-management approach to corporate information. Information Management solutions can help companies deliver a governance program to deal with corporate information, System info: Archives consumers and creators of that information, System info: Archives, in the context of real business processes.

Successful Information Governance programs demand that companies balance the needs and priorities to mitigate legal and business risk, take advantage of information to drive business value, and minimize the costs of managing information.

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cpio -ov > /path/to/output_folder/obj.cpio

To extract a cpio System info: Archives file.

# cpio -idv < /path/to folder/obj.cpio

5. Gzip

gzip is standard and widely used file compression and decompression utility. Gzip allows file concatenation. Compressing the file with gzip, outputs the tarball which is in the format of ‘*.tar.gz‘ or ‘*.tgz‘.

gzip options

  1. –stdout : Produce output on standard output.
  2. –to-stdout : Produce output on standard output.
  3. –decompress : Decompress File.
  4. –uncompress : Decompress File.
  5. -d : Decompress File.
  6. -f : Force Compression/Decompression.
gzip Examples

Create an ‘gzip’ archive file.

# tar -cvzf name_of_archive.tar.gz /path/to/folder

To extract a ‘gzip’ archive file.

# gunzip file_name.tar.gz

The above command must be passed followed with below command.

# tar -xvf file_name.tar

Note: The architecture and functionality of ‘gzip’ makes it difficult to recover corrupted ‘gzipped tar archive’ file. It is advised to make several backups of gzipped Important files, at different Locations.

That’s all for now. We will be discussing other compressing and decompressing applications, available for Linux, in our next article. Till then stay tuned and connected to Tecmint. Don’t forget to provide us with your valuable feedback in the comment section below.

Tags archive tools

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If you like System info: Archives you are reading, please consider buying us a coffee ( or 2 ) as a token System info: Archives appreciation.

Support Us

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.). In addition, these unsupported modules are not available in the installer, System info: Archives, and the package is not part of the SUSE Linux Enterprise media.

  • Kernel modules not provided under a license compatible to the license of the Linux kernel will also taint the kernel. For details, see and the state of.

  • 43.6.1 Technical Background#Edit source

    • Linux kernel: The value of defaults to on SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP1 (). This default is used System info: Archives in the installer and in the installed system. See for more information.

    • : The utility for checking module dependencies and loading modules appropriately checks for the value of the flag. If the value is “yes” or “external” the module will be loaded, otherwise it will not. For information on how to override this behavior, see Section 43.6.2, “Working with Unsupported Modules”.

      Note
      Note: Support

      SUSE does not generally support the removal of storage modules via System info: Archives.

    43.6.2 Working with Unsupported Modules#Edit source

    While general supportability is important, situations can occur where loading an unsupported module is required. For example, for testing or debugging purposes, or if your hardware vendor provides a hotfix. Action Genre - PC Games - Hiu Games PT System info: Archives To override the default, edit and change the value System info: Archives the variable to. If an unsupported module is needed in the initrd, do not forget to run to update the initrd.

    If you only want to try loading a module once, you can use the option with . For more information, see the man page, System info: Archives.

  • During installation, unsupported modules may be added through driver update disks, and they will be loaded. To enforce loading of unsupported modules during boot and afterward, use the kernel command line option . While installing and initializing the package, the kernel flag () will be evaluated. If the kernel is already tainted, will be enabled. This will prevent unsupported modules from failing in the system being installed. If no unsupported modules are present during installation and the other special kernel command line option () is not used, the default still is to disallow unsupported modules.

  • System info: Archives Remember that loading and running unsupported modules will make the kernel and the whole system unsupported by SUSE.

    Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

    Records Inventory - Electronic Information Systems

    Introduction

    An electronic information system is the organized collection, processing, transmission, and dissemination of information according to defined procedures. It includes three categories of information: (1) inputs, (2) the information on the electronic media, and (3) outputs. Along with these categories of recorded information, the agency should inventory and schedule any related indexes and also the documentation needed to maintain and use the electronic records. Note that system documentation is covered by GRS 3-1, items 050 (permanent) and 051 (temporary). System input and outputs may also be covered by GRS (5.1 and 5.2).

    Elements of the Electronic Information System Inventory

    Each agency should maintain a complete and accurate inventory of all its electronic records systems to meet its own needs and to comply with National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) regulations (36 CFR 1236.26). This inventory should include the elements indicated below. NARA has developed an information system inventory form (instructions), which may be used to collect some of this information.

    1. Name of the system. Indicate the commonly used name and acronym of the system. For example, the Grain Monitoring System (GMS) or the State Energy Data System (SEDS).

    2. System control number. Specify the internal control number (if one exists) assigned to the system for reference, control, or cataloging purposes.

    3. Agency program supported by the system. Show the agency program(s) or mission(s) to which the system relates, and cite any authorizing laws or directives. Also list the names, System info: Archives, office addresses, telephone numbers, and locations of program personnel who can provide additional information about the program and the system supporting it.

    4. Purpose of the system. Indicate the reasons for the system and the requirements it meets.

    5. Data input and sources. Describe the primary data input sources and the providers of the data to the system. For example, broadcast license holders or corporations doing business in the United States, System info: Archives. Indicate the form numbers of any agency forms used as input sources. Also give the names of any other systems, either inside or outside the agency, from which macdrive serial key Archives information system receives data.

    6. Major outputs. Show the system's main products and the frequency of their preparation, System info: Archives. For example, reports, tables, charts, graphic displays, catalogs, or correspondence prepared weekly, monthly, or yearly. Also indicate whether the information is transferred to other systems.

    7. Information content. Indicate what persons, places, or things are the subjects of the records in the system and what information is maintained on those subjects. Also indicate timespan, geographic coverage, update cycle, and other major characteristics of the system. Finally, tell whether the system saves superseded information and whether it contains microdata or summary data.

    8. Hardware/software environment. Indicate the computer system manipulating this information and the software used. For example, System info: Archives, MySQL, Microsoft Access or Sharepoint, Oracle database, System info: Archives, COBOL or Java application programs; DEC VAX 780, BASIS DBMS.

    9, System info: Archives. System managers. List the name, office, telephone number, and location of the system manager or other system personnel who can provide more information about the system and the program it supports.

    10. Location of documentation needed to read and understand the files. Show where the codebooks and file layouts are maintained. Indicate the office, room number, System info: Archives, and name of the person having custody of them.

    11. Restrictions on access and use. Indicate national security, privacy, or other restrictions. Cite any Privacy Act restrictions on records proposed for eventual destruction and any Freedom of Information Act restrictions on records proposed for immediate transfer to the National Archives.

    12. Authorized disposition of the information as determined by the General Records Schedules or other NARA-approved disposition authority. For example, "Permanent." If not covered by a schedule, then indicate "Unscheduled" and recommend a disposition.

    13. Disposition authority citation. Cite any records schedule and item number(s) covering the records contained in this system. Include any NARA-approved records schedule(s) and item number(s) authorizing disposition of system components, such as input forms, printouts, COM, System info: Archives, and output reports. If there are no such citations, indicate "None."

    14. Location and volume of any storage media containing identical information. Show the location of any magnetic tapes or disks containing information identical to that in the system being inventoried. Also indicate the number of tapes and/or disks and their storage capacity.

    15. Identification of the person conducting the inventory. List that person's name, office, telephone number, and location.

    16. Date prepared. List the date the inventory was prepared.


    Back to Main Page

    Back to Previous Section

    Forward to Next Section

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    System info: Archives - the

    In our day-to-day life we come across, archived files on the platforms of all kind be it Windows, Mac or Linux. There are several Application program available for all of the platforms to create archive files as well as uncompress them. When it comes to work on Linux Platform, we need to deal with archived files very frequently.

    Linux Command Line Archive Tools

    Here in this article we will be discussing archive tools available on standard Linux Distribution, their features, Examples, etc. The article divided into two parts, each part contains five command line archive tools (i.e. total of 10 Best Command Line Archive Tools).

    What is Archived file?

    An archive file is a compressed file which is composed of one or more than one computer files along with metadata.

    Features of Archiving

    1. Data Compression
    2. Encryption
    3. File Concatenation
    4. Automatic Extraction
    5. Automatic Installation
    6. Source Volume and Media Information
    7. File Spanning
    8. Checksum
    9. Directory Structure Information
    10. Other Metadata (Data About Data)
    11. Error discovery

    Area of Application

    1. Store Computer Files System along with Metadata.
    2. Useful in transferring file locally.
    3. Useful in transferring file over web.
    4. Software Packaging Application.

    The useful archiving application on standard Linux distribution follows:

    1. tar Command

    tar is the standard UNIX/Linux archiving application tool. In its early stage it used to be a Tape Archiving Program which gradually is developed into General Purpose archiving package which is capable of handling archive files of every kind. tar accepts a lot of archiving filter with options.

    tar options

    1. -A : Append tar files to existing archives.
    2. -c : Create a new archive file.
    3. -d : Compare archive with Specified filesystem.
    4. -j : bzip the archive
    5. -r : append files to existing archives.
    6. -t : list contents of existing archives.
    7. -u : Update archive
    8. -x : Extract file from existing archive.
    9. -z : gzip the archive
    10. –delete : Delete files from existing archive.
    tar Examples

    Create a tar archive file.

    # tar -zcvf name_of_tar.tar.gz /path/to/folder

    Decompress an tar archive file.

    # tar -zxvf Name_of_tar_file.tar.gz

    For more detailed examples, read 18 Tar Command Examples in Linux.

    shar Command

    shar which stands for Shell archive is a shell script, the execution of which will create the files. shar is a self-extracting archive file which is a legacy utility and needs Unix Bourne Shell to extract the files. shar has an advantage of being plain text however it is potentially dangerous, since it outputs an executable.

    shar options

    1. -o : Save output to archive files as specified, in the option.
    2. -l : Limit the output size, as specified, in the option but do not split it.
    3. -L : Limit the output size, as specified, in the option and split it.
    4. -n : Name of Archive to be included in the header of the shar files.
    5. -a : Allow automatic generation of headers.

    Note: The ‘-o‘ option is required if the ‘-l‘ or ‘-L‘ option is used and the ‘-n‘ option is required if the ‘-a‘ option is used.

    shar Examples

    Create a shar archive file.

    # shar file_name.extension > filename.shar

    Extract an shar archive file.

    # unshar file_name.shar

    3. ar Command

    ar is the creation and manipulation utility for archives, mainly used for binary object file libraries. ar stands for archiver which can be used to create archive of any kind for any purpose but has largely been replaced by ‘tar’ and now-a-days it is used only to create and update static library files.

    ar options

    1. -d : Delete modules from the archive.
    2. -m : Move Members in the archive.
    3. -p : Print specified members of the archive.
    4. -q : Quick Append.
    5. -r : Insert file member to archive.
    6. -s : Add index to archive.
    7. -a : Add a new file to the existing members of archive.
    ar Examples

    Create an archive using ‘ar‘ tool with a static library say ‘libmath.a‘ with the objective files ‘substraction’ and ‘division’ as.

    # ar cr libmath.a substraction.o division.o

    To extract an ‘ar’ archive file.

    # ar x libmath.a

    4. cpio

    cpio stands for Copy in and out. Cpio is a general purpose file archiver for Linux. It is actively used by RedHatPackage Manager (RPM) and in the initramfs of Linux Kernel as well as an important archiving tool in Apple Computer’s Installer (pax).

    cpio options

    1. -0 : Read a list of filenames terminated by a null character instead of a newline.
    2. -a : Reset Access time.
    3. -A : Append.
    4. -b : swap.
    5. -d : Make Directories.
    cpio Examples

    Create an ‘cpio’ archive file.

    # cd tecmint # ls file1.o file2.o file3.o # ls

    Providing access to memory since 2007

    Multilingual

    All user interface elements and database content can be translated into multiple languages, using our built-in translation interface. Our translations are all generously provided by volunteer translators from the AtoM User Community. Want to see AtoM available in your language? Help us translate!

    Multirepository

    Built for use by a single institution for its own descriptions, or as a multi-repository “union list” (network, portal) accepting descriptions from any number of contributing institutions, AtoM is flexible enough to accommodate your needs. See our list of community users for a better sense of all the ways AtoM is being used.

    Constantly improving

    AtoM is an active, dynamic open-source project with a broad user base. We're constantly working with our community to improve the application, and all enhancements are bundled into our public releases. This means that whenever one person contributes, the entire community benefits. Find out more about how you can help improve AtoM.

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    Security requirements in EHR systems and archives

    EHR system is a system for recording, retrieving, and manipulating information in electronic health care records. Archive is an organisation that intends to preserve health records for access and use for an identified group of consumers. There exist many combinations of EHR-systems and archives. EHR-system can be a single on-line system with integrated archiving functions or archive and EHR-system are co-operative or federated systems. This paper describes both common security requirements for EHR-systems and archives and security requirement specific for archives. Requirements are derived from ethical and legal principles. From principles a set of security requirements are derived. Safeguards for implementing security are discussed. In practise EHR-system and archive share many security services. This document is proposing that inside a security domain both the archive and EHR-system have a common security policy. In addition to this the archiving organisation needs a documented policy for information preserving and a policy for access and distribution of information between other archives.

    Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]
    cpio -ov > /path/to/output_folder/obj.cpio

    To extract a cpio archive file.

    # cpio -idv < /path/to folder/obj.cpio

    5. Gzip

    gzip is standard and widely used file compression and decompression utility. Gzip allows file concatenation. Compressing the file with gzip, outputs the tarball which is in the format of ‘*.tar.gz‘ or ‘*.tgz‘.

    gzip options

    1. –stdout : Produce output on standard output.
    2. –to-stdout : Produce output on standard output.
    3. –decompress : Decompress File.
    4. –uncompress : Decompress File.
    5. -d : Decompress File.
    6. -f : Force Compression/Decompression.
    gzip Examples

    Create an ‘gzip’ archive file.

    # tar -cvzf name_of_archive.tar.gz /path/to/folder

    To extract a ‘gzip’ archive file.

    # gunzip file_name.tar.gz

    The above command must be passed followed with below command.

    # tar -xvf file_name.tar

    Note: The architecture and functionality of ‘gzip’ makes it difficult to recover corrupted ‘gzipped tar archive’ file. It is advised to make several backups of gzipped Important files, at different Locations.

    That’s all for now. We will be discussing other compressing and decompressing applications, available for Linux, in our next article. Till then stay tuned and connected to Tecmint. Don’t forget to provide us with your valuable feedback in the comment section below.

    Tags archive tools

    If you liked this article, then do subscribe to email alerts for Linux tutorials. If you have any questions or doubts? do ask for help in the comments section.

    If You Appreciate What We Do Here On TecMint, You Should Consider:

    TecMint is the fastest growing and most trusted community site for any kind of Linux Articles, Guides and Books on the web. Millions of people visit TecMint! to search or browse the thousands of published articles available FREELY to all.

    If you like what you are reading, please consider buying us a coffee ( or 2 ) as a token of appreciation.

    Support Us

    We are thankful for your never ending support.

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    Meet Requirements

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    43.1 Displaying Current System Information#Edit source

    For a quick and easy overview of all relevant system information when logging in to a server, use the package . After it has been installed on a machine, the console displays the following information to any user that logs in to this machine:

    Example 43.1: Output of When Logging In as #

    Welcome to SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 15 (x86_64) - Kernel \r (\l). Distribution: SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 15 SP0 Current As Of: Mon Jun 10 12:02:21 2019 Hostname: earth Kernel Version: 4.12.14-150.14-default Architecture: x86_64 Installed: Mon Apr 29 14:34:30 2019 Status: Not Tainted Last Installed Package: Mon Jun 10 11:56:07 2019 Patches Needed: 62 Security: 26 3rd Party Packages: 9 Network Interfaces eth0: 192.168.2/24 2002:c0a8:20a::/64 Memory Total/Free/Avail: 7.5G/5.7G/6.4G (86% Avail) CPU Load Average: 6 (3%) with 2 CPUs SSH Host Keys (RSA): SHA256:AaBior5diakoA+AeNUgPEwsVA0/uM6Ako7PSnDfXV2E (DSA): SHA256:Ky3SofWZduR208ikVdYOGFQM4OTWHKubDGaClHJgHuM (ECDSA): SHA256:styGTl+QWSDk0F3HFF31Kamk1KEVnMHin9DIaqbIFZI (ED25519): SHA256:MXmPSNczpF2SfyCWB92k++Yl+md5ncxSdEvyQLzkuEE Storage Devices /dev/sda: 60 GiB

    In case the output shows a kernel status, see Section 43.6, “Support of Kernel Modules” for more details.

    43.2 Collecting System Information with Supportconfig#Edit source

    To create a TAR archive with detailed system information that you can hand over to Global Technical Support, use either:

    • the command or,

    • the YaST module.

    The command line tool is provided by the package which is installed by default. The YaST module is also based on the command line tool.

    Depending on which packages are installed on your system, some of these packages integrate Supportconfig plug-ins. When Supportconfig is executed, all plug-ins are executed as well and create one or more result files for the archive. That has the benefit that the only topics checked are those that contain a specific plug-in for them. Supportconfig plug-ins are stored in the directory .

    43.2.1 Creating a Service Request Number#Edit source

    Supportconfig archives can be generated at any time. However, for handing over the Supportconfig data to Global Technical Support, you need to generate a service request number first. You will need it to upload the archive to support.

    To create a service request, go to https://scc.suse.com/support/requests and follow the instructions on the screen. Write down the service request number.

    43.2.3 Creating a Supportconfig Archive with YaST#Edit source

    To use YaST to gather your system information, proceed as follows:

    1. Start YaST and open the module.

    2. Click .

    3. In the next window, select one of the Supportconfig options from the radio button list. is preselected by default. If you want to test the report function first, use . For additional information on the other options, refer to the man page.

      Press .

    4. Enter your contact information. It is saved in the file and included in the created archive.

    5. To submit the archive to Global Technical Support, provide the required . YaST automatically suggests an upload server. To modify it, refer to Section 43.2.2, “Upload Targets” for details of which upload servers are available.

      To submit the archive later, leave the empty.

    6. Press to start the information collection process.

      After the process is finished, press .

    7. To review the collected data, select the desired file from to view its contents in YaST. To remove a file from the TAR archive before submitting it to support, use . Press .

    8. Save the TAR archive. If you started the YaST module as user, YaST prompts to save the archive to (otherwise, to your home directory). The file name format is .

    9. To upload the archive to support directly, make sure is activated. The shown here is the one that YaST suggests in Step 5. To modify the upload target, check which upload servers are available in Section 43.2.2, “Upload Targets”.

    10. To skip the upload, deactivate .

    11. Confirm the changes to close the YaST module.

    43.2.4 Creating a Supportconfig Archive from Command Line#Edit source

    The following procedure shows how to create a Supportconfig archive, but without submitting it to support directly. For uploading it, you need to run the command with certain options as described in Procedure 43.2, “Submitting Information to Support from Command Line”.

    1. Open a shell and become .

    2. Run . Usually, it is enough to run this tool without any options. Some options are very common and are displayed in the following list:

      , , ,

      Sets your contact data: e-mail address (), company name (), your name (), and your phone number ().

      ,

      Limits the features to check. The placeholder KEYWORDS is a comma separated list of case-sensitive keywords. Get a list of all keywords with .

      Defines your service request number when uploading the generated TAR archive.

    3. Wait for the tool to complete the operation.

    4. The default archive location is , with the file name format being

    43.2.5 Understanding the Output of #Edit source

    Whether you run through YaST or directly, the script gives you a summary of what it did.

    Support Utilities - Supportconfig Script Version: 3.0-98 Script Date: 2017 06 01 [...] Gathering system information Data Directory: /var/log/scc_d251_180201_1525 1 Basic Server Health Check... Done 2 RPM Database... Done 2 Basic Environment... Done 2 System Modules... Done 2 [...] File System List... Skipped 3 [...] Command History... Excluded 4 [...] Supportconfig Plugins: 1 5 Plugin: pstree... Done [...] Creating Tar Ball ==[ DONE ]=================================================================== Log file tar ball: /var/log/scc_d251_180201_1525.txz 6 Log file size: 732K Log file md5sum: bf23e0e15e9382c49f92cbce46000d8b =============================================================================

    1

    The temporary data directory to store the results. This directory is archived as tar file, see 6.

    2

    The feature was enabled (either by default or selected manually) and executed successfully. The result is stored in a file (see Table 43.1, “Comparison of Features and File Names in the TAR Archive”).

    3

    The feature was skipped because some files of one or more RPM packages were changed.

    4

    The feature was excluded because it was deselected via the option.

    5

    The script found one plug-in and executes the plug-in . The plug-in was found in the directory . See the man page for details.

    6

    The tar file name of the archive, by default compressed with .

    43.2.6 Common Supportconfig Options#Edit source

    The utility is usually called without any options. Display a list of all options with or refer to the man page. The following list gives a brief overview of some common use cases:

    Reducing the Size of the Information Being Gathered

    Use the minimal option ():

    supportconfig -m
    Limiting the Information to a Specific Topic

    If you have already localized a problem that relates to a specific area or feature set only, you should limit the collected information to the specific area for the next run. For example, if you detected problems with LVM and want to test a recent change that you did to the LVM configuration. In that case it makes sense to gather the minimum Supportconfig information around LVM only:

    supportconfig -i LVM

    Additional keywords can be separated through commas. For example, an additional disk test:

    supportconfig -i LVM,DISK

    For a complete list of feature keywords that you can use for limiting the collected information to a specific area, run:

    supportconfig -F
    Including Additional Contact Information in the Output:
    supportconfig -E tux@example.org -N "Tux Penguin" -O "Penguin Inc." ...

    (all in one line)

    Collecting Already Rotated Log Files
    supportconfig -l

    This is especially useful in high logging environments or after a kernel crash when syslog rotates the log files after a reboot.

    43.2.7 Overview of the Archive Content#Edit source

    The TAR archive contains all the results from the features. Depending on what you have selected (all or only a small set), the archive can contain more or less files. The set of features can be limited through the option (see Section 43.2.6, “Common Supportconfig Options”).

    To list the content of the archive, use the following command:

    xf /var/log/scc_earth_180131_1545.tbz

    The following file names are always available inside the TAR archive:

    Minimum Files in Archive #

    Contains the date when this script was executed and system information like version of the distribution, hypervisor information, and more.

    Contains some basic health checks like uptime, virtual memory statistics, free memory and hard disk, checks for zombie processes, and more.

    Contains basic hardware checks like information about the CPU architecture, list of all connected hardware, interrupts, I/O ports, kernel boot messages, and more.

    Contains log messages from the system journal.

    Contains a list of all installed RPM packages, the name, where they are coming from, and their versions.

    Contains some information in XML format like distribution, the version, and product specific fragments.

    Contains information about the script itself.

    Contains YaST specific information like specific packages, configuration files, and log files.

    Table 43.1, “Comparison of Features and File Names in the TAR Archive” lists all available features and their file names. Further service packs can extend the list, as can plug-ins.

    Table 43.1: Comparison of Features and File Names in the TAR Archive #

    FeatureFile name
    APPARMOR
    AUDIT
    AUTOFS
    BOOT
    BTRFS
    DAEMONS
    CIMOM
    CRASH
    CRON
    DHCP
    DISK
    DNS
    DOCKER
    DRBD
    ENV
    ETC
    HA
    HAPROXY
    HISTORY
    IB
    IMAN
    ISCSI
    LDAP
    LIVEPATCH
    LVM
    MEM
    MOD
    MPIO
    NET
    NFS
    NTP
    NVME
    OCFS2
    OFILES
    PRINT
    PROC
    SAR
    SLERT
    SLP
    SMT
    SMART
    SMB
    SRAID
    SSH
    SSSD
    SYSCONFIG
    SYSFS
    TRANSACTIONAL
    TUNED
    UDEV
    UFILES
    UP
    WEB
    X

    43.3 Submitting Information to Global Technical Support#Edit source

    Use the YaST module or the command line utility to submit system information to the Global Technical Support. When you experience a server issue and want the support's assistance, you will need to open a service request first. For details, see Section 43.2.1, “Creating a Service Request Number”.

    The following examples use 12345678901 as a placeholder for your service request number. Replace 12345678901 with the service request number you created in Section 43.2.1, “Creating a Service Request Number”.

    Procedure 43.2: Submitting Information to Support from Command Line #

    The following procedure assumes that you have already created a Supportconfig archive, but have not uploaded it yet. For instructions on how to generate and submit a Supportconfig archive in one go, see Section 43.2.3, “Creating a Supportconfig Archive with YaST”.

    1. Servers with Internet connectivity:

      1. To use the default upload target, run:

        supportconfig -ur 12345678901
      2. For the secure upload target, use the following:

        supportconfig -ar 12345678901
    2. Servers without Internet connectivity

      1. Run the following:

        supportconfig -r 12345678901
      2. Manually upload the archive to one of our FTP servers. Which one to use depends on your location in the world. For an overview, see Section 43.2.2, “Upload Targets”.

    3. After the TAR archive arrives in the incoming directory of our FTP server, it becomes automatically attached to your service request.

    43.4 Analyzing System Information#Edit source

    System reports created with can be analyzed for known issues to help resolve problems faster. For this purpose, SUSE Linux Enterprise Server provides both an appliance and a command line tool for (SCA). The SCA appliance is a server-side tool which is non-interactive. The SCA tool ( provided by the package sca-server-report) runs on the client-side and is executed from command line. Both tools analyze Supportconfig archives from affected servers. The initial server analysis takes place on the SCA appliance or the workstation on which is running. No analysis cycles happen on the production server.

    Both the appliance and the command line tool additionally need product-specific patterns that enable them to analyze the Supportconfig output for the associated products. Each pattern is a script that parses and evaluates a Supportconfig archive for one known issue. The patterns are available as RPM packages.

    You can also develop your own patterns as briefly described in Section 43.4.3, “Developing Custom Analysis Patterns”.

    43.4.2 SCA Appliance#Edit source

    If you decide to use the SCA appliance for analyzing the Supportconfig archives, configure a dedicated server (or virtual machine) as the SCA appliance server. The SCA appliance server can then be used to analyze Supportconfig archives from all machines in your enterprise running SUSE Linux Enterprise Server or SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop. You can simply upload Supportconfig archives to the appliance server for analysis. Interaction is not required. In a MariaDB database, the SCA appliance keeps track of all Supportconfig archives that have been analyzed . You can read the SCA reports directly from the appliance Web interface. Alternatively, you can have the appliance send the HTML report to any administrative user via e-mail. For details, see Section 43.4.2.5.4, “Sending SCA Reports via E-Mail”.

    43.4.2.1 Installation Quick Start#Edit source

    To install and set up the SCA appliance in a very fast way from the command line, follow the instructions here. The procedure is intended for experts and focuses on the bare installation and setup commands. For more information, refer to the more detailed description in Section 43.4.2.2, “Prerequisites” to Section 43.4.2.3, “Installation and Basic Setup”.

    Prerequisites #

    • Web and LAMP Pattern

    • Web and Scripting Module (you must register the machine to be able to select this module).

    Note
    Note: Privileges Required

    All commands in the following procedure must be run as .

    Procedure 43.3: Installation Using Anonymous FTP for Upload #

    After the appliance is set up and running, no more manual interaction is required. This way of setting up the appliance is therefore ideal for using cron jobs to create and upload Supportconfig archives.

    1. On the machine on which to install the appliance, log in to a console and execute the following commands:

      zypper install sca-appliance-* sca-patterns-* vsftpd systemctl enable apache2 systemctl start apache2 systemctl enable vsftpd systemctl start vsftpd yast ftp-server
    2. In YaST FTP Server, select  ›  ›  ›  ›  to .

    3. Execute the following commands:

      systemctl enable mysql systemctl start mysql mysql_secure_installation setup-sca -f

      The mysql_secure_installation will create a MariaDB password.

    Procedure 43.4: Installation Using SCP/tmp for Upload #

    This way of setting up the appliance requires manual interaction when typing the SSH password.

    1. On the machine on which to install the appliance, log in to a console.

    2. Execute the following commands:

      zypper install sca-appliance-* sca-patterns-* systemctl enable apache2 systemctl start apache2 sudo systemctl enable mysql systemctl start mysql mysql_secure_installation setup-sca

    43.4.2.2 Prerequisites#Edit source

    To run an SCA appliance server, you need the following prerequisites:

    • All packages.

    • The package. Additionally, any of the product-specific for the type of Supportconfig archives that you want to analyze with the appliance.

    • Apache

    • PHP

    • MariaDB

    • anonymous FTP server (optional)

    43.4.2.3 Installation and Basic Setup#Edit source

    As listed in Section 43.4.2.2, “Prerequisites”, the SCA appliance has several dependencies on other packages. Therefore you need do so some preparations before installing and setting up the SCA appliance server:

    1. For Apache and MariaDB, install the and installation patterns.

    2. Set up Apache, MariaDB, and optionally an anonymous FTP server. For more information, see Chapter 38, The Apache HTTP Server and Chapter 39, Setting Up an FTP Server with YaST.

    3. Configure Apache and MariaDB to start at boot time:

      systemctl enable apache2 mysql
    4. Start both services:

      systemctl start apache2 mysql

    Now you can install the SCA appliance and set it up as described in Procedure 43.5, “Installing and Configuring the SCA Appliance”.

    Procedure 43.5: Installing and Configuring the SCA Appliance #

    After installing the packages, use the script for the basic configuration of the MariaDB administration and report database that is used by the SCA appliance.

    It can be used to configure the following options you have for uploading the Supportconfig archives from your machines to the SCA appliance:

    1. Install the appliance and the SCA base-pattern library:

      zypper install sca-appliance-* sca-patterns-base
    2. Additionally, install the pattern packages for the types of Supportconfig archives you want to analyze. For example, if you have SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 15 servers in your environment, install both the and packages.

      To install all available patterns:

      zypper install sca-patterns-*
    3. For basic setup of the SCA appliance, use the script. How to call it depends on how you want to upload the Supportconfig archives to the SCA appliance server:

      • If you have configured an anonymous FTP server that uses the directory, execute the setup script with the option. Follow the instructions on the screen:

        setup-sca -f
        Note
        Note: FTP Server Using Another Directory

        If your FTP server uses another directory than , adjust the following configuration files first to make them point to the correct directory: and .

      • If you want to upload Supportconfig files to the directory of the SCA appliance server via , call the setup script without any parameters. Follow the instructions on the screen:

      The setup script runs a few checks regarding its requirements and configures the needed components. It will prompt you for two passwords: the MySQL password of the MariaDB that you have set up, and a Web user password with which to log in to the Web interface of the SCA appliance.

    4. Enter the existing MariaDB password. It will allow the SCA appliance to connect to the MariaDB.

    5. Define a password for the Web user. It will be written to and will be set as the password for the user . Both user name and password can be changed at any time later, see Section 43.4.2.5.1, “Password for the Web Interface”.

    After successful installation and setup, the SCA appliance is ready for use, see Section 43.4.2.4, “Using the SCA Appliance”. However, you should modify some options such as changing the password for the Web interface, changing the source for the SCA pattern updates, enabling archiving mode or configuring e-mail notifications. For details on that, see Section 43.4.2.5, “Customizing the SCA Appliance”.

    Warning
    Warning: Data Protection

    As the reports on the SCA appliance server contain security-relevant information, make sure to protect the data on the SCA appliance server against unauthorized access.

    43.4.2.4 Using the SCA Appliance#Edit source

    You can upload existing Supportconfig archives to the SCA appliance manually or create new Supportconfig archives and upload them to the SCA appliance in one step. Uploading can be done via FTP or SCP. For both, you need to know the URL where the SCA appliance can be reached. For upload via FTP, an FTP server needs to be configured for the SCA appliance, see Procedure 43.5, “Installing and Configuring the SCA Appliance”.

    43.4.2.4.1 Uploading Supportconfig Archives to the SCA Appliance#Edit source

    • For creating a Supportconfig archive and uploading it via (anonymous) FTP:

      supportconfig -U “ftp://SCA-APPLIANCE.COMPANY.COM/upload”
    • For creating a Supportconfig archive and uploading it via SCP:

      supportconfig -U “scp://SCA-APPLIANCE.COMPANY.COM/tmp”

      You will be prompted for the user password of the server running the SCA appliance.

    • If you want to manually upload one or multiple archives, copy the existing archive files (usually located at) to the SCA appliance. As target, use either the appliance server's directory or the directory (if FTP is configured for the SCA appliance server).

    43.4.2.4.2 Viewing SCA Reports#Edit source

    SCA reports can be viewed from any machine that has a browser installed and can access the report index page of the SCA appliance.

    1. Start a Web browser and make sure that JavaScript and cookies are enabled.

    2. As a URL, enter the report index page of the SCA appliance.

      https://sca-appliance.company.com/sca

      If in doubt, ask your system administrator.

    3. You will be prompted for a user name and a password to log in.

      Figure 43.2: HTML Report Generated by SCA Appliance #

    4. After logging in, click the date of the report you want to read.

    5. Click the category first to expand it.

    6. In the column, click an individual entry. This opens the corresponding article in the SUSE Knowledge base. Read the proposed solution and follow the instructions.

    7. If the column of the shows any additional entries, click them. Read the proposed solution and follow the instructions.

    8. Check the SUSE Knowledge base (https://www.suse.com/support/kb/) for results that directly relate to the problem identified by SCA. Work at resolving them.

    9. Check for results that can be addressed proactively to avoid future problems.

    43.4.2.5 Customizing the SCA Appliance#Edit source

    The following sections show how to change the password for the Web interface, how to change the source for the SCA pattern updates, how to enable archiving mode, and how to configure e-mail notifications.

    43.4.2.5.1 Password for the Web Interface#Edit source

    The SCA Appliance Web interface requires a user name and password for logging in. The default user name is and the default password is (if not specified otherwise, see Procedure 43.5, “Installing and Configuring the SCA Appliance”). Change the default password to a secure password at the earliest possibility. You can also modify the user name.

    Procedure 43.6: Changing User Name or Password for the Web Interface #

    1. Log in as user at the system console of the SCA appliance server.

    2. Open in an editor.

    3. Change the values of and as desired.

    4. Save the file and exit.

    43.4.2.5.2 Updates of SCA Patterns#Edit source

    By default, all packages are updated regularly by a cron job that executes the script nightly, which in turn runs . A regular system update will update all SCA appliance and pattern packages. To update the SCA appliance and patterns manually, run:

    zypper update sca-*

    The updates are installed from the SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP1 update repository by default. You can change the source for the updates to an RMT server, if desired. When runs , it gets the updates from the currently configured update channel. If that channel is located on an RMT server, the packages will be pulled from there.

    Procedure 43.7: Disabling Automatic Updates of SCA Patterns #

    1. Log in as user at the system console of the SCA appliance server.

    2. Open in an editor.

    3. Change the entry

      UPDATE_FROM_PATTERN_REPO=1

      to

      UPDATE_FROM_PATTERN_REPO=0
    4. Save the file and exit. The machine does not require any restart to apply the change.

    43.4.2.5.3 Archiving Mode#Edit source

    All Supportconfig archives are deleted from the SCA appliance after they have been analyzed and their results have been stored in the MariaDB database. However, for troubleshooting purposes it can be useful to keep copies of Supportconfig archives from a machine. By default, archiving mode is disabled.

    Procedure 43.8: Enabling Archiving Mode in the SCA Appliance #

    1. Log in as user at the system console of the SCA appliance server.

    2. Open in an editor.

    3. Change the entry

      to

    4. Save the file and exit. The machine does not require any restart to apply the change.

    After having enabled archive mode, the SCA appliance will save the Supportconfig files to the directory, instead of deleting them.

    43.4.2.5.4 Sending SCA Reports via E-Mail#Edit source

    The SCA appliance can e-mail a report HTML file for each Supportconfig analyzed. This feature is disabled by default. When enabling it, you can define a list of e-mail addresses to which the reports should be sent. Define a level of status messages that trigger the sending of reports ().

    Possible Values for #

    $STATUS_OFF

    Deactivate sending of HTML reports.

    $STATUS_CRITICAL

    Send only SCA reports that include a CRITICAL.

    $STATUS_WARNING

    Send only SCA reports that include a WARNING or CRITICAL.

    $STATUS_RECOMMEND

    Send only SCA reports that include a RECOMMEND, WARNING or CRITICAL.

    $STATUS_SUCCESS

    Send SCA reports that include a SUCCESS, RECOMMEND, WARNING or CRITICAL.

    Procedure 43.9: Configuring E-Mail Notifications for SCA Reports #

    1. Log in as user at the system console of the SCA appliance server.

    2. Open in an editor.

    3. Search for the entry . By default, it is set to (e-mail notifications are disabled).

    4. To enable e-mail notifications, change to the level of status messages that you want to have e-mail reports for, for example:

      STATUS_NOTIFY_LEVEL=$STATUS_SUCCESS

      For details, see Possible Values for .

    5. To define the list of recipients to which the reports should be sent:

      1. Search for the entry .

      2. Replace with a list of e-mail addresses to which SCA reports should be sent. The e-mail addresses must be separated by spaces. For example:

        EMAIL_REPORT='tux@my.company.com wilber@your.company.com'
    6. Save the file and exit. The machine does not require any restart to apply the changes. All future SCA reports will be e-mailed to the specified addresses.

    43.4.2.6 Backing Up and Restoring the Database#Edit source

    To back up and restore the MariaDB database that stores the SCA reports, use the command as described below. is provided by the package sca-appliance-broker.

    Procedure 43.10: Backing Up the Database #

    1. Log in as user at the system console of the server running the SCA appliance.

    2. Put the appliance into maintenance mode by executing:

    3. Start the backup with:

      The data is saved to a TAR archive: .

    4. If you are using the pattern creation database to develop your own patterns (see Section 43.4.3, “Developing Custom Analysis Patterns”), back up this data, too:

      The data is saved to a TAR archive: .

    5. Copy the following data to another machine or an external storage medium:

      • (only needed if you have created custom patterns)

    6. Reactivate the SCA appliance with:

      scadb reset agents

    Procedure 43.11: Restoring the Database #

    To restore the database from your backup, proceed as follows:

    1. Log in as user at the system console of the server running the SCA appliance.

    2. Copy the newest and TAR archives to the SCA appliance server.

    3. To decompress the files, run:

      gzip -d *-backup-*sql.gz
    4. To import the data into the database, execute:

      scadb import sca-backup-*sql
    5. If you are using the pattern creation database to create your own patterns, also import the following data with:

      sdpdb import sdp-backup-*sql
    6. If you are using custom patterns, also restore from your backup data.

    7. Reactivate the SCA appliance with:

      scadb reset agents
    8. Update the pattern modules in the database with:

      sdagent-patterns -u

    43.4.3 Developing Custom Analysis Patterns#Edit source

    The SCA appliance comes with a complete pattern development environment (the SCA Pattern Database) that enables you to develop your own, custom patterns. Patterns can be written in any programming language. To make them available for the Supportconfig analysis process, they need to be saved to and to be made executable. Both the SCA appliance and the SCA tool will then run the custom patterns against new Supportconfig archives as part of the analysis report. For detailed instructions on how to create (and test) your own patterns, see https://www.suse.com/c/blog/sca-pattern-development/.

    43.5 Gathering Information during the Installation#Edit source

    During the installation, is not available. However, you can collect log files from YaST by using . This command will create a archive in the directory .

    If issues appear very early during installation, you may be able to gather information from the log file created by . is a small command that runs before YaST starts. This log file is available at .

    Important
    Important: Installation Log Files Not Available in the Installed System

    The log files available during the installation are not available in the installed system anymore. Properly save the installation log files while the installer is still running.

    43.6 Support of Kernel Modules#Edit source

    An important requirement for every enterprise operating system is the level of support you receive for your environment. Kernel modules are the most relevant connector between hardware (“controllers”) and the operating system. Every kernel module in SUSE Linux Enterprise has a flag that can take three possible values:

    • “yes”, thus

    • “external”, thus

    • “” (empty, not set), thus

    The following rules apply:

    • All modules of a self-recompiled kernel are by default marked as unsupported.

    • Kernel modules supported by SUSE partners and delivered using are marked “external”.

    • If the flag is not set, loading this module will taint the kernel. Tainted kernels are not supported. Unsupported Kernel modules are included in an extra RPM package (). That package is only available for SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop and the SUSE Linux Enterprise Workstation Extension. Those kernels will not be loaded by default (FLAVOR=


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