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PS2 Games Archives

PS2 Games Archives

After digging through archives for almost a year, a video game preservation group has now rescued and released more than 700 previously. PS2 Crash of The Titans (CIB) PAL. €14,00. Out of stock. PS2 Star Ocean Till the End of Time (CIB) PAL. €15,00. PS2 Final Fantasy X-2 (10-2) (CIB) NTSC. Such preservation efforts include archiving development source code and art assets, digital copies of video games, emulation of video game hardware.

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After digging through archives for almost a year, a video game preservation group has now rescued and released more than 700 previously unreleased prototype games and demos for the PlayStation 2.

Falling under what The Hidden Palace calls “Project Deluge,” the more than 700 titles were showcased across a six-hour Twitch stream, which you can watch over on the group’s channel. The entire inventory of games amounted to over 850GB of data and focuses specifically on master pdf editor Archives - Patch Cracks prototypes and demos as well as unreleased revisions of various PS2 Games Archives. Some of the titles were presented at past E3s and other conventions but never made it to a full launch. Big names in the library include Crash Bandicoot: The Wrath of CortexShadow of the ColossusGod HandDino Stalker, Final Fantasy X-2Dragon’s Lair 3D, and Legacy of Kain: Soul Reaver 2.

For those interested in checking the huge treasure trove of retro games out, you can head over to The Hidden Palace’s website.

Elsewhere in gaming, an Age of Empires IV fan preview is coming early next month. PS2 Games Archives PS2 Games Archives

PS2 Games Archives Read Full Article

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Video game preservation

Form of preservation in video gaming

Video game preservation seeks to collect games from a wide variety of game systems no longer in production.

Video game preservation is a form of preservation applied to the video game industry that includes, but is not limited to digital preservation. Such preservation efforts include archiving development source code and art assets, digital copies of video games, emulation of video game hardware, maintenance and preservation of specialized video game hardware such as arcade games and video game consoles, and digitization of print video game magazines and books prior to the Digital Revolution.

Importance of preservation[edit]

Besides retaining the ability to play games from the past, preservation of video games enables research on the history of video games as well as ways for developers F1 2021 download pc Archives look at older games to build ideas from.[1] There is also interest in the preservation of cancelled video games that were known to be in development, as coupled with the reasons for cancellation, they can provide a understanding of the technical and creative aspects, or lack thereof, at the time of the game's PS2 Games Archives some examples of other forms of media like books, art and photography, and film, which antedate the mid-20th century and which can be preserved in a variety of formats that are not prohibited by more-recent intellectual property (IP) laws, video games typically require specialized and/or proprietary computer PS2 Games Archives and software to read and execute game software. However, as technology advances, these older game systems become obsolete, no longer produced nor maintained to use for executing games.[3] The media formats of the early days of computer gaming, relying on floppy discs and CD-ROMs, suffer from disc rot and degrade over time, making it difficult to recover information.[4] Further, video games tend to rely on other resources like operating systems, network connectivity, and external servers outside control of users, and making sure these boundary aspects to a video game are preserved along with the game are also essential.[3]

One period of the video game industry that has received a great deal of attention is up through the 1980s. As a result of the video game crash of 1983, many companies involved in developing games folded or were acquired by other companies. In this process, PS2 Games Archives, the source code for many games prior to the crash were lost or destroyed, leaving only previously-sold copies of games on their original format as evidence of their existence.[5] Even of companies that survived the crash, long-term planning towards preservation was not always a consideration. Both Nintendo and Sega are considered part of the few companies from this period known to have actively worked to backup and retain their games, even those that were cancelled or unreleased, over time.[2]

Preservation also has become an issue with the prevalence of digital distribution on console platforms; as manufacturers drop support for older hardware, games that exist only in digital form may be lost. This issue came to light when Sony Interactive Entertainment announced plans to shut down storefronts for the PlayStation 3, PlayStation Portable and PlayStation Vita by mid-2021, though which Sony later reversed, leaving the PlayStation 3 and Vita stores open indefinitely, while limiting PlayStation Portable purchases to the Vita and PlayStation 3 storefronts.[6] An estimated 2,200 games across these platforms were only available digitally, and while most have versions on other platforms, about 120 were exclusive to the Sony platform and would become completely unavailable after the stores' closure. Prior to reversing their decision, Sony did not provide any immediate plans to offer these titles by other means.[7]

Preservation has become a greater priority for game companies since the 2000s with the ease of redundant digital storage solutions, and thus tends not to be an issue for games issued since that point. Frank Cifaldi, director of the Video Game History Foundation, said that Electronic Arts had developed an extensive means of preserving their games at the end of the development cycle, and had contacted former employees to collect data and assets from past games to help preserve their titles.[8]

Legal issues[edit]

See also: Intellectual property protection of video games

Most issues related to video game preservation are based on the United States, one of the largest markets for video games, and as such, issues related to preservation are limited by laws of the country.

In general, the copying and distribution of video games that are under copyright without authorization is considered a copyright violation (often called as software piracy). However, it has generally been tolerated that users may make archival copies of software (including video games) as long as they own the original software; if the user sells or loses the original software in any way, they must destroy the archival copies. This is also justification for a person being able to make ROM PS2 Games Archives from game cartridges that they own.

In 1998, the United States Congress passed the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), designed to bring copyright within the United States to align with two doctrines published by the World Intellectual Property Organization in 1996. The DMCA make it a criminal offense to develop, sell, or use technologies that are designed to bypass anti-circumvention devices, including software digital rights management (DRM) used in various forms of media. This subsequently made it illegal to backup up one's software for many games distributed via either game cartridge or optical disc, PS2 Games Archives, if some form of DRM was used to limit access to the software on the media.

The Library of Congress is responsible to open submissions for specific and narrow exemptions from interested parties every three years, and determine which PS2 Games Archives those, if any, to grant. Through the Library of Congress, some key exceptions to the DMCA have been granted Adobe InDesign CS5 Crack Full Version Free Download allow for video game preservation.

  • In the 2003 set of exemptions, the Library disallowed enforcement of the DMCA for "computer programs protected by dongles that prevent access due to malfunction or damage and which PS2 Games Archives obsolete" and for "computer programs and video games distributed in formats that have become obsolete and which require the original media or hardware as a condition of access".[9]
  • In the 2015 exemptions, the Library granted permission for preservationists to work around copy-protection in games which required an authentication step with PS2 Games Archives external server that was no longer online prior to playing the PS2 Games Archives which otherwise did not require online connectivity; this specifically did not cover games that were based on a server-client mode like most massively-multiplayer online games (MMOs). The exemption included the use of emulators and other computer programs that would be required to play the game on available systems.[10]
  • In the 2018 exemptions, the Library allowed for preservation and fair use of server-based games like MMOs, permitting preservationists to offer such games where they have legally obtained the game's code within museums and libraries.[11]

The DMCA exemptions do not mean all ROM images are legal, and concern about continuing video game preservation was raised in mid-2018, after Nintendo initiated a lawsuit against two websites that distributed ROMs for games from their older platforms.[12]

Normal copyright laws and contractual agreements may also hamper legitimate preservation efforts, PS2 Games Archives. The 2000 game The Operative: No One Lives Forever and its sequel are considered to be in copyright limbo due to subsequent business moves that dispersed where the IP may have gone: the games were developed by Monolith Productions which after publication became a subsidiary of Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment. The games' publisher was Sierra Entertainment, which had been owned by Fox Interactive, a subsidiary of 20th Century Fox, but later sold to Vivendi Games; Vivendi Games itself eventually was merged into Activision Blizzard. Around 2014, Nightdive Studios, a company with interest in reviving old games, had spent significant time working between Warner Bros., PS2 Games Archives, Fox, and Activision to try to track down the ownership of the game's IP but none of the three companies had immediate knowledge of the IP's state, and did not see the value in searching their paper archives to find the required documents, particularly in the case of jointly-owned IP.[13]

Further hampering preservation issues is the fact that most video game development are made as work for hire products, PS2 Games Archives, with the ownership kept by the company that hires the video game developers rather than with the developer themselves. Many developers PS2 Games Archives kept some or all of the game's code they have worked on, but typically cannot release this due to their employment contracts and because their employer owns that copyright. However, some developers, after enough time has passed, have released their code to preservation efforts despite not owning the copyright directly, on the basis that the value of preservation would outweigh the impact on copyright.[2]

Preservation of video game software[edit]

Emulation[edit]

Video game console emulators use software that replicates the hardware environment of a video-game console, arcade machine, or specific PC architecture. Generally these create a virtual machine on newer computer systems that simulate the key processing units of the original hardware. The emulators then can read in software, such as a ROM image for arcade games or cartridge-based systems, or the game's optical media disc or an ISO image of that disc, to play the game in full.[14]

Emulation has been used in some official capacity on newer consoles. Nintendo's Virtual Console allows games from its earlier consoles and other third-parties to be played on its newer ones. Sony had originally released the PlayStation 3 with backwards compatibility with PlayStation 1 and PlayStation 2 games if players had the original media, but have transitioned to selling emulated games in its PlayStation Store as well as offering the PlayStation Nowcloud gaming service that allows PlayStation 3 games to be played on other devices including the PlayStation 4 and compatible personal computers. Microsoft has created a backwards compatibility program through emulation to allow selected Xbox titles to be played on the Xbox 360, and similarly another program for certain Xbox and Xbox 360 titles to be played on the Xbox One and Xbox Series X and Series S if they own the original game, and have made some of these titles available for purchase via digital distribution through Xbox Live. Former console hardware companies such as Sega and Atari have released emulation-based collections of their games for multiple systems.

In the PC space, emulation of either a game engine or full operating system are available. In these cases, PS2 Games Archives are expected to own copies of the game to PS2 Games Archives the content files. DOSBox emulates a complete IBM PC compatible operating system allowing most games for older computers to be run on modern systems, PS2 Games Archives. Emulators also exist for older arcade games, such as MAME.

Head of Xbox Game StudiosPhil Spencer has also suggested that cloud gaming can help with emulation and preservation, as on the server backend for cloud gaming, more technical resources can be offered to support emulation in a manner that appears transparent to the end user.[15] Spencer said "My hope (and I think I have to present it that way as of now) is as an industry we'd work on legal emulation that allowed modern hardware to run any (within reason) older executable allowing PS2 Games Archives to play any game."[16]

There are legalities related to emulation that can make it difficult to preserve video games in this manner. First, the legality of creating an emulator itself is unclear. Several United States case laws, notably Sony Computer Entertainment, Inc. v, PS2 Games Archives. Connectix Corp. (2000), have shown that developing emulation is a legal activity as long as no proprietary information or copyrighted code is incorporated into the emulation. Ant Download Manager Pro 2.1.0 Full Version Features generally requires that the PS2 Games Archives be developed through reverse engineering in a clean room design, PS2 Games Archives, using only publicly-released information about the system. Once completed, emulators need access to a game's ROM image or even a console's BIOS image. While acquiring a copy of a ROM or BIOS by dumping from a console one owns for one's own use falls within fair use, obtaining and distributing ROM and BIOS images from other parties are recognized as copyright violations.[14]

Migration[edit]

Migration refers to re-releasing software from one platform to a newer platform, otherwise keeping all the gameplay, narrative, and art assets the same. This can be done through a few routes:[17]

  • Game engine recreation: A new universal game engine can be developed that uses the original game assets but otherwise runs on any future hardware platform. Such examples include the Z-machine for many of the Infocom text adventure games, and the ScummVM allows players to run nearly every LucasArts adventure game.
  • Software re-compilation or porting: The original source code for the PS2 Games Archives is re-compiled for a newer platform, making necessary changes to work on the newer hardware. This requires that the source code for the original game is available for this purpose. Many of the games published by Digital Eclipse are based on decompiling PS2 Games Archives the original game's code with approval of the copyright owner into their own Eclipse engine which allows for porting to any number of systems.[18][19]

Abandonware[edit]

Abandonware refers to software that may still be capable of running on modern computers or consoles, PS2 Games Archives, but the developer or publisher has either disappeared, no longer sell the product, or no longer operate servers necessary for running the software, among other cases. Examples include Freelancer (as its publisher went out of business) and Black & White (due to the closure of the development studio). The aforementioned No One Lives Forever is considered such a case due to the lack of interest of the known likely-rights holders to affirm their ownership and work out licensing arrangements for rerelease.[20]

Because of the lack PS2 Games Archives availability of any legal retail route to purchase the case, these games may be offered at no cost by some websites, such as Home of the Underdogs, typically with necessary patches to remove copyright protection and updates to play on newer systems.[21] Legally, such software still falls under normal copyright laws, making this practice illegal, PS2 Games Archives. Copyright only disappears over time depending on its copyright term (from 75 to 90 years for most video games), and PS2 Games Archives with shuttered companies, the copyright is an asset that often becomes owned by the liquidator of the closed company. Normally it would be up to the copyright owner to seek legal action, and with shuttered developers and publishers, this often did not happen, but since around 1999, video game trade organizations like the Entertainment Software Association have stepped in PS2 Games Archives take direct action against sites as representatives for all of its members.[21]

Under the DMCA, the Copyright Office has made exceptions since 2015 for allowing museums and other archivists to bypass copyright issues to get such software into a playable state, a new exception seeks to allow this specifically for multiplayer games requiring servers, specifically massively-multiplayer online games.[22]

Fan-driven efforts[edit]

In some cases, fans of a video game have helped to preserve the game to the best of their abilities without access to source code, even though the copyright nature of these fan projects are highly contentious, and more so when monetary issues are involved. Games like Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic II and Vampire: The Masquerade – Bloodlines, PS2 Games Archives, which had difficult production issues before release, may leave unused assets to be found by players, and in the case of both these games, players have developed unofficial patches that work to complete the content, in some cases, exceeding expectations of the original content creators.[23] Remakes of games to modern platforms or game engines may also be led through fan efforts. PS2 Games Archives Mesa is a fan-based remake of the first Half-Life game from Valve Corporation, but enhancing the game's assets from the original GoldSrc game engine to the newer Source engine, with Valve's blessing for the effort.[24]

Databases[edit]

Video game databases have been created to track historical video games, particularly those from the early days of the industry which have become forgotten.[25] Sites like MobyGames and the Internet Games Database (IGDB).[26][27]Home of the Underdogs remains a database of early computer games after the site eliminated its abandonware offerings.[21] User-driven databases (often referred to as "dats") created by video game "datting" groups that store hashes and other important metadata provide a quality assurance aspect by comparing different contributors' dump results. Redump.org stores the hash and metadata information for over 70,000 video game disc dumps. No-Intro.org stores the metadata and hashes for cartridge and DLC based games and PS2 Games Archives. These systems PS2 Games Archives as a card catalog to track game releases across various regions, comparing software revisions and other data such as serial numbers and barcodes. Additional databases, PS2 Games Archives, both functional and defunct, include TOSEC and PS2 Games Archives.

Others[edit]

Source code for older games, PS2 Games Archives, before rights were strongly controlled by PS2 Games Archives, were often kept by the programmers themselves, and they may release those, or may be part of their estate after death, PS2 Games Archives. In one case, PS2 Games Archives, a lost Nintendo Entertainment System game, an earlier version of Days of Thunder by Chris Oberth, who had died in 2012, was recovered from source code on floppy discs from his work materials in 2020 by the Video Game History Foundation with permission of his family.[28]

Preservation of video game software has come through dubious routes. Notably, the source code for all of the Infocom text adventure games had been obtained by Jason Scott in 2008 via an anonymous user in the "Infocom drive", an archive file that represented the entirety of the Infocom's main server days prior to the company's relocation from Massachusetts to California in 1989. While Scott was aware this was akin to industrial espionage, he still had published the source code for the games for purposes of preservation.[29] John Hardie of the National Videogame Museum had gone dumpster diving through the trash of shutdown companies to recover materials for his collection.[30]

Preservation of video game hardware[edit]

LockDown 2000 2.5.4 crack serial keygen only known existing hardware unit of the Super NES CD-ROM- a Sony-produced Super Nintendo Entertainment System with a CD-ROM system and the predecessor of the PlayStation

While in most cases, digitizing the software for video games is sufficient for preservation, there have been enough unique consoles with limited production runs that can create further challenges for video game preservation as it is difficult to emulate its software. When hardware is in ready supply, white-hat hackers and programmers can freely tear-down these systems to PS2 Games Archives their internals for reverse engineering for preservation, but when systems are in limited supply, such tactics are not appropriate. These systems can also degrade as well. More often, broken or non-functional versions of older hardware can be acquired to demonstrate that such systems existed, but fail to work as a software preservation tool. For example, only one copy of the Super NES CD-ROM, a Sony-produced Super Nintendo Entertainment System with a CD-ROM drive, has been found out of an estimated 200 that were produced before Sony and Nintendo's deal changed. The unit was carefully repaired to be able to use the CD-ROM so that some functionality of its software could be verified and allow the few known software titles to be tested on it.[31]

Print media preservation[edit]

Box art and game manuals accompanied most games published before 2000, and there had been an extensive number of magazines published on video games which have since declined. There is a strong interest in the digital preservation of these materials alongside software and hardware as reference material to help document the early history of video games, which did not receive the type of detailed coverage that the field sees as of the 2010s. In most cases, these works are preserved through digital scanning and storage from libraries and user collections.[32] The Video Game History Foundation maintains a physical and digital collection of these magazines in their collection, while PS2 Games Archives has similarly worked to provide digital archives of retro gaming magazines under a fair use approach given that most of these magazines PS2 Games Archives their publishers are now defunct.[33]

Preservation efforts[edit]

Library of Congress[edit]

The United States Library of Congress (LoC) launched the National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program (NDIIPP) in 2000 to preserve non-traditional media. Around 2007, the LoC started reaching out to partners in various industries to help explore how they archive such content. The LoC had funded the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign (UIUC) from 2004 to 2010 to develop the ECHO DEPository ("Exploring Collaborations to Harvest Objects in a Digital Environment for Preservation") program.[34]

Preserving Virtual Worlds[edit]

Preserving Virtual Worlds was one project funded by the LoC and conducted by the Rochester Institute of Technology, Stanford University, the University of Maryland, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, along with support from Linden Lab, running from 2008 to 2010. The study explored a range of games, PS2 Games Archives, from Spacewar! (1962) through Second Life (2003, which was developed by Linden Labs), to determine what methods could be used for preserving these titles. The project concluded that while there are technical solutions for preservation of game software, such as identifying common formats for digital storage and developing database architectures to track ownership, many issues related to preservation remain legal in nature relating to copyright laws.[3][35]

National Film and Sound Archive[edit]

The National Film and Sound Archive of Australia announced in September 2019 that they will start to create an archive of Australian-developed video games for preservation and exhibition, with games to be added on an annual basis. The preservation effort will include not only the software but art, music and other creative assets as well as making considerations for playability in the long-term.[36]

Internet Archive[edit]

The Internet Archive started adding emulation of video games from older systems for play.[37] The Archive developed Emularity, a web-browser based emulator to run a number of out-of-production arcade, console and computer emulations, and offer numerous titles to marvel spiderman played through the Archive. VideoPad Video Editor 8.00 license key Archives project's maintainer, PS2 Games Archives, Jason Scott, said that most companies do not take issue with their ROM images being offered in this manner, but did PS2 Games Archives that Nintendo has put pressure on them to not include any Nintendo consoles within the collection.[38][39] They also began to archive Adobe Flash animations and games in November 2020, ahead of the December 31, 2020, end-of-life for Adobe Flash, using a new emulator called Ruffle.[40]

Video Game History Foundation[edit]

Main article: Video Game History Foundation

Frank Cifaldi is one of the leading historians in the video game industry trying to encourage more video game preservation and to help recover games once thought lost, PS2 Games Archives. By 2017, he had spent about twenty years trying to encourage preservation as to track video game history, and established the non-profit Video Game History Foundation in 2017. The Foundation not only PS2 Games Archives to preserve games, but box art, manuals, and promotional material from video games, believing that these combined can help future historians understand the culture of games in the past.[41][42]

National Videogame Museum[edit]

Main article: National Videogame Museum

The National Videogame Museum in the United States bore out of archival work performed by John Hardie who had run the Classic Gaming Expo, PS2 Games Archives. During this time Hardie had collected a number of video game materials from others and his own efforts. The collection of material collected drew interest from industry events including E3[43][44] and the Game Developers Conference,[45] helping to promote the collection, PS2 Games Archives. Hardie exhibited the materials through traveling shows, and got interest from Randy Pitchford to establish a permanent home for PS2 Games Archives collection. The Museum was opened in Frisco, Texas, in 2016. While some companies have donated materials to the Museum, Hardie stated it has been difficult in convincing other developers and publishers to contribute to the preservation efforts.[30]

The Centre PS2 Games Archives Computing History[edit]

Main article: Centre for Computing History

The Centre for Computing History's ongoing efforts have resulted in the physical preservation of over 13,000 video games since 2008.[46] Information for every item in the collection is accessible via their online catalogue. The Centre also digitally archives source code for games such as the Magic Knight series by David Jones,[47] and preserves and hosts scans of original PS2 Games Archives and other development materials from game companies such as Guerrilla Games. Their work emphasises the importance of preserving all aspects of the experience of a game, from marketing materials to the copy protection experience, packaging, and hardware.[48] The Centre's collection also hosts uncommon hardware and operating systems with this in mind. The Centre is also working with current video game developers and publishers, acting as a repository for their ongoing work so that it is actively preserved.[49]

The Strong Institute[edit]

Main article: International Center for the History of Electronic Games

Among other educational aspects The Strong institute in Rochester, New York, operates the International Center for the History of Electronic Games.[4]

Videogame Heritage Society[edit]

The Videogame Heritage Society is an effort started by the United Kingdom's National Videogame Museum along with the British Library, the Museum of London, the Centre for Computing History, the National Science and Media Museum in Bradford, Bath Spa University, and several independent collectors in 2020 to preserve video games developed in the United Kingdom.[50]

Game Preservation Society[edit]

Founded in 2011 in Tokyo, the Game Preservation Society preserves the history of Japanese video games. The organization's focus PS2 Games Archives the preservation of 1980s Japanese computer games for platforms like the PC-88 and Sharp X1. The society's president, French national Joseph Redon, estimates that they will only be able to preserve about 80% of Japanese computer games.[51]

National Software Reference Library[edit]

While strictly not set up for preservation, the National Software Reference Library, created and maintained by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has included a number of popular game software among other software principally used for help in digital forensics, storing electronic copies of these PS2 Games Archives and other programs. The initial games collection was added in 2016 with numerous titles collected by Stephen Cabrinety, who had died PS2 Games Archives 1995;[52] in 2018, Valve, Activision-Blizzard, and Electronic Arts all donated additional titles to be added to the collection, while NIST itself purchased other popular titles to include.[53]

Hong Kong Game Association (RETRO.HK)[edit]

Founded in 2015 in Hong Kong by Dixon Wu and other volunteers with decades of video game knowledge, PS2 Games Archives, the Hong Kong Game Association is a non-profit society dedicated to preserve, curate, and showcase video game history, especially focusing on locally developed PC & console games, and traditional Chinese video game literature. The Association organizes the annual RETRO.HK Gaming Expo and RetroCup - free annual retro game events that are dedicated to promoting video game and competitive gaming as a culture and art form to the public.[54] The association has worked with multiple local universities or colleges to promote the cause, such as The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, The City University of Hong Kong, PS2 Games Archives, The Open University of Hong Kong, and the Hong Kong Institute of Vocational Education (IVE) group.

The Museum of Art and Digital Entertainment[edit]

Founded in 2011 in Oakland, California, the Museum of Art and Digital Entertainment, the MADE performed the first institutional preservation of an online game when it worked with F. Randall Farmer, Chip Morningstar, PS2 Games Archives, Fujitsu, and a group of volunteers to relaunch LucasFilm Games' Habitat.[55] This work lead to collaboration with UC Berkeley to petition for a 1201 DMCA exemption for the preservation of MMO PS2 Games Archives The source code to Habitat has since been release as open source software under the MIT license.[57] The MADE continues to work on further digital preservation, focusing on source code and online games.

Flashpoint[edit]

The Adobe Flash standard, PS2 Games Archives, heavily used in browser-based video games in the 2000s, was fully removed from most web browsers at the end of 2020 due to long-running security issues with the Flash format, and made these SpyHunter free download Archives unplayable. An effort called Flashpoint was established in 2018 to collect as many PS2 Games Archives the freely-available Flash games as possible for archival purposes, excluding those games that were offered commercially or that require a server to play, and allowing authors to request PS2 Games Archives. As of January 2020, the Flashpoint project has more than 38,000 Flash games in its archive.[58][59]

Project Deluge[edit]

Project Deluge, run by a group of VMware Workstation Pro 16.1.2 Final Full Version Download game fans called Hidden Palace, is a collection of various video game prototypes from the PlayStation, PlayStation 2, Sega Saturn, Sega Dreamcast, CD-i, and original Xbox console games available in various forms for users to view or play, typically through use of an emulator. These prototypes reportedly are based on a collection of such games maintained by one user who had worked to assure all the prototypes they collected from developers and publishers were digitally preserved so that Hidden Palace was then able to share them with the larger community. Such prototypes can help video game historians YouWave All Version crack serial keygen how games had changed over their development period, as well as prototypes of cancelled games.[60][61]

Rereleases[edit]

Companies like GOG.com and Night Dive Studios are recognized for helping to migrate older games to modern systems. Among their efforts include doing the research to track down all legal rights that are associated with a game, including those that have changed hands several times, as to get clearance or rights to republish the title, locate as much of the game's original source code and adapt that to work on modern systems, or when source code PS2 Games Archives not available, reverse engineer the game to either work natively or through emulation (like DOSBox) with modern hardware. GOG.com and Night Dive have successfully freed some games from IP limbo, such as System Shock 2, while identifying titles that remain difficult to republish and preserve legally due to conflicts on IP rights holders, PS2 Games Archives, such as No One Lives Forever.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^Bonthuys, Darryn (April 5, 2021), PS2 Games Archives. "Why Game Preservation Is So Important PS2 Games Archives Microsoft". GameSpot. Retrieved April 5, 2021.
  2. ^ abcWilliams, Leah (August 4, 2021). "The Tricky, Essential Art of Preserving Canceled Games Like Starfox 2". Kotaku. Retrieved August 4, 2021.
  3. ^ abcMcDonough, Jerome P.; Olendorf, Robert; Kirschenbaum, Matthew; Kraus, Kari; Reside, Doug; Donahue, Rachel; Phelps, Andrew; Egert, Christopher; Lowood, Henry; Rojo, Susan (August 31, 2010), PS2 Games Archives. Preserving Virtual Worlds Final Report (Report). University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved August 23, PS2 Games Archives, 2018.CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  4. ^ abOre, Jonathan (January 17, 2017). "Preserving video game history is about more than nostalgia". CBC. Retrieved August 15, 2018.
  5. ^Whan, Christopher (August 12, 2018). "Retro game preservation in limbo after Nintendo files lawsuit". Global News. Retrieved August 14, 2018.
  6. ^Good, Owen (April 19, 2021). "PlayStation Store for PS3, PS Vita will not shut down, Sony announces". Polygon. Retrieved April 19, 2021.
  7. ^Scullion, Chris (April 2, 2021). "Analysis: 2,000 digital-only games will disappear when PlayStation closes its stores". Video Games Chronicle. Retrieved April 2, 2021.
  8. ^Ong, Alexis (June 24, 2020). "A lawsuit against the Internet Archive threatens vital gaming history". PC Gamer. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  9. ^"Rulemaking on Exemptions from Prohibition on Circumvention of Technological Measures that Control Access to Copyrighted Works". United States Library of Congress. October ExpanDrive FREE DOWNLOAD Archives, 2003. Retrieved March 20, 2017.
  10. ^Statt, Nick (October 27, 2015). "US government says it's now okay to jailbreak your tablet and smart TV". The Verge. Retrieved October 26, 2018.
  11. ^Kerr, Chris (October 26, 2018). "The Library of Congress just made game preservation a little bit easier". Gamasutra. Retrieved October 26, 2018.
  12. ^Kohler, Chris (August 14, 2018). "In Defense of ROMs, A Solution To Dying Games And Broken Copyright Laws". Kotaku. Retrieved August 18, 2020.
  13. ^Hamilton, Kirk (February 27, 2015). "The Sad Story Behind A Dead PC Game That Can't Come Back". Kotaku. Retrieved February 27, 2015.
  14. ^ abConley, James; Andros, Ed; Chinai, Priti; Lipkowitz, Elise (2003). "Use of a game over: Emulation and the video game industry, a white paper". Northwest Journal of Technology and Intellectual Property. 2: 261.
  15. ^Bonthuys, Darryn (July 16, 2021). "Xbox Head Phil Spencer Hopes The Industry Will Protect Old Games From Extinction". GameSpot. Retrieved July 16, 2021.
  16. ^Totilo, Stephan (November 17, 2021). "Microsoft gaming chief calls for industry-wide game preservation". Axios. Retrieved November 17, 2021.
  17. ^Guttenbrunner, PS2 Games Archives Becker, Christoph; Rauber, Andreas (2010). "Keeping the Game Alive: Evaluating Strategies for the Preservation of Console Video Games". The International Journal of Digital Curation. 5 (1): 64–90. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.297.318. doi:10.2218/ijdc.v5i1.144.
  18. ^Orland, Kyle (August 27, 2015). "The new tech making game preservation more authentic PS2 Games Archives future-proof". Ars Technica. Archived from the original on April 11, 2019. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  19. ^Watts, Steve (March 23, 2017). "Disney Afternoon FL Studio 20.8.4.2553 Crack With RegKey 2021 Free Download Producer Talks Challenges and Nostalgia". Shacknews. Archived from the original on June 12, 2018. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  20. ^Brinbaum, Ian (November 28, 2016). "15 great games you can't buy digitally". PC Gamer. Retrieved April 19, 2021.
  21. ^ abcWalker, Alex (December 26, 2020). "The Legacy Behind The Internet's PS2 Games Archives Important Abandonware Site". Kotaku. Retrieved April 19, PS2 Games Archives, 2021.
  22. ^Wawro, Alex. "U.S. gov't stands by DMCA exemption for museums preserving online Anime - Genre - Free Download - Full Cracked - Repack - Hiu Games, Leah (October 14, 2018). "How Fan-Based Projects Are Helping Preserve Video Game History". IGN. Retrieved October 17, 2018.
  23. ^Kelly, Andy (November 2, 2017). "The story of Half-Life remake Black Mesa". PC Gamer. Archived from the original on September 17, 2018. Retrieved September 16, 2018.
  24. ^Rochat, Yannick (2019). "Chapter 1: A Quantitative Study of Historical Video Games (1981–2015)". In von Lünen, Alexander; Lewis, Katherine J.; Litherland, Benjamin; Cullum, Pat (eds.). Historia Ludens: The Playing Historian. ISBN .
  25. ^Wawro, Alex (31 December 2013). "Game dev database MobyGames getting some TLC under new owner". Gamasutra. Retrieved 2014-01-01.
  26. ^Perez, PS2 Games Archives, Sarah (September 17, 2020). "Twitch acquires gaming database site IGDB to improve its search and discovery PS2 Games Archives. TechCrunch. Retrieved November 14, 2020.
  27. ^Carpenter, PS2 Games Archives, Nicole (June 1, 2020). "Video game preservationists reconstruct decades-lost, never-released NES game". Polygon. Retrieved June 1, 2020.
  28. ^Kohler, Chris (April 18, 2008). "'Infocom Drive' Turns Up Long-Lost Hitchhiker Sequel". Wired. Retrieved January 26, 2016.
  29. ^ abShanley, Patrick (December 23, 2019). "The Video Game Industry Is Over 50: Who's Keeping Track of Its History?". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved January 29, 2020.
  30. ^Olson, Mathew (March 11, 2020). "Nintendo PlayStation Grabbed Headlines, But Support for Preservation Remains "Dismal at Best"". USGamer. Retrieved March 11, 2020.
  31. ^Nicholls, Florence Smith (June 24, 2020). "Who gets to write video game history?". Eurogamer. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  32. ^Kunzelman, PS2 Games Archives, Cameron (September 2, 2021). "The emotional rollercoaster PS2 Games Archives retro gaming magazine collecting". Polygon. Retrieved September 2, 2021.
  33. ^Patricia, Hswe; S., Kaczmarek, Joanne; Leah, Houser; Janet, Eke (7 October 2018). "The Web Archives Workbench (WAW) Tool Suite: Taking an Archival Approach to the Preservation of Web Content".
  34. ^Lazer, Matthew (June 20, 2018). "Saving "virtual worlds" from extinction". Ars Technica. Retrieved December 19, 2018.
  35. ^Reilly, Luke (September 26, 2019). "National Film and Sound Archive of Australia to Collect, Preserve Aussie Video Games". IGN. Retrieved September 26, 2019.
  36. ^"Microcomputer Software Lives Again, This Time in Your Browser - Internet Archive Blogs". blog.archive.org.
  37. ^Orland, Kyle (August 21, 2018). "ROM sites are falling, but a legal loophole could save game emulation". Ars Technica. Retrieved August 21, 2018.
  38. ^Scott, Jason (September 24, PS2 Games Archives. "Over 1,100 New Arcade Machines Added to the Internet Arcade". The Internet Archive. Retrieved September 24, 2018.
  39. ^Campbell, Ian Carlos (November 19, PS2 Games Archives, 2020). "The Internet Archive is now preserving Flash games and animations". The Verge. Retrieved November 19, 2020.
  40. ^Bowman, Mitch (February 27, 2017). "Inside The Video Game History Foundation". Polygon. Retrieved August 14, 2018.
  41. ^Alexander, Heather (February 27, 2017). "New Non-Profit Has Plans To Save Gaming's Past". Kotaku. Retrieved August 14, 2018.
  42. ^Andrew Cunningham (June 16, 2013). "A trip through gaming history: the Videogame History Museum at E3". Ars Technica. Retrieved 13 October 2014.
  43. ^"The Videogame History Museum shows off vintage games and gear at E3 2014". CNET. June 12, 2014. Retrieved 13 October 2014.
  44. ^Melissa Aparicio (March 19, 2014). "Nintendo nostalgia takes a turn at Game Developers Conference". Tech Hive. Retrieved 13 October 2014.
  45. ^"Centre for Computing History Homepage Archive Counter". computinghistory.org.uk.
  46. ^"Magic Knight Computer Preserved at Museum". computinghistory.org.uk.
  47. ^"Video Game Heritage & Preservation". computinghistory.org.uk.
  48. ^"A Call to the Video Game Developers". computinghistory.org.uk.
  49. ^Batchelor, James (February 25, 2020). "National Videogame Museum launches new games preservation initiative". GamesIndustry.biz. Retrieved February 25, 2020.
  50. ^Kohler, Chris (December 28, 2017). "Saving Japan's Games". Kotaku, PS2 Games Archives. Retrieved 2018-08-21.
  51. ^"Digital Forensics Rescues Retro Video Games and Software". National Institute of Standards and Technology. September 12, 2016. Retrieved September 10, 2018.
  52. ^Valentine, Rebekah (September 10, 2018). "NIST adds gaming software to National Software Reference Library". GamesIndustry.biz. Retrieved September 10, 2018.
  53. ^Williams, Carl (December 23, 2016). "Interview – Dixon Wu Founder Of Retro Hk Annual Convention". Windows 10 Pro Key [16 June 2020] crack serial keygen Game Magazine. Retrieved August 21, 2019.
  54. ^Farmer, F. Randall (January 20, 2016). "NeoHabitat Homepage". Retrieved December 13, 2019.
  55. ^Handy, Alex (November 9, 2017). "Comment of the Museum of Art and PS2 Games Archives Entertainment"(PDF). Retrieved December 13, 2019.
  56. ^"Habitat Source Code on GitHub". May 4, 2017. Retrieved December 13, 2019.
  57. ^Bailey, Dustin (February 1, 2020). "Every Flash game disappears forever in 2020 – but this project has preserved 38,000 of them". PCGamesN. Retrieved February 1, 2020.
  58. ^Morton, Lauren (January 31, 2020). "Flashpoint launcher is saving Flash games from impending extinction". Rock Paper Shotgun. Retrieved February 1, 2020.
  59. ^Robinson, Andy (March 21, 2021). "Group shares '700 PS2 game prototypes' including Shadow of the Colossus, Final Fantasy X and more". Video Games Chronicle. Retrieved September 20, 2021.
  60. ^Price, Reneta (September 20, PS2 Games Archives, 2021). "Almost 500 'New' Xbox, Dreamcast Prototypes Just Got Released". Kotaku. Retrieved September 20, 2021.
Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Redump - Sony Playstation 2 - USA - Part 1

plus-circle PS2 Games Archives Add Review

comment

PS2 Games Archives Reviews

Reviewer:CMV1994- favorite- October 2, 2021
Subject:Torrent showing only 60GB of files! PLEASE FIX IT!!!

Please fix or reupload this torrent! When i open it in client it PS2 Games Archives only 60GB. Around 850GB of data is missing! PS2 Games Archives

Reviewer:Olddantrucker- favorite- September 14, 2021
Subject:Why does Archive.org suck at torrents?

Are they on drugs or something? Since drugs are decriminalized now I can see that becoming a BIG problem further contributing to the 'web rot' phenomena, PS2 Games Archives.

Reviewer:Doomtrigger- favoritefavorite- September 6, 2021
Subject:torrents not showing all games stops at a.

Dont know why the torrents are broken

Reviewer:Unforgivenll- favoritefavoritefavorite- June 19, 2021
Subject:Good Download?

PS2 Games Archives This probably is a fine set, but all the bin files have been renamed so that they don't match the original cue PS2 Games Archives. What good reason could you have for doing that? The formating for the titles do not really make sense either. Why would you put a space between the filename and the file type? All of the files read like this "Crash Bandicoot .bin". Weird nonsensical decisions here. I appreciate the contribution though, thank you, Unfortunately after downloading 2tb plus, PS2 Games Archives, I will have to go with a proper set.

Reviewer:Paultimate79- favoritefavoritefavoritefavoritefavorite- March 11, 2021
Subject:Torrent

archive.or makes the torrent automatically. not the uploader. PS2 Games Archives

Reviewer:Ion88- favoritefavoritefavorite- July 5, 2020
Subject:Missing Titles in .torrent file

Amazing archive first and foremost!

But I have run into a problem with trying to run the torrent file, the torrent itself only seems to go up to 2/3 of 'a' and is missing the rest of the archive.

Anyway that can be updated to show the correct number of games?

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Namco Museum

Series of compilation games

Video game series

Namco Museum
Namco Museum logo.png
Genre(s)Various
Developer(s)
Publisher(s)
Platform(s)PlayStation, Nintendo 64, Dreamcast, Game Boy Advance, PS2 Games Archives, PlayStation 2, Xbox, GameCube, PlayStation Portable, Microsoft Windows, Nintendo DS, Wii, Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
First releaseNamco Museum Vol. 1
November 22, 1995
Latest releaseNamco Museum Archives Vol. 2
June 18, 2020

Namco Museum[a] is a series of video game compilations developed and published by Bandai Namco Entertainment for home video game consoles. The first title in the series, PS2 Games Archives, Namco Museum Vol. 1, was released for the PlayStation in 1995. Entries in the series have been released for multiple platforms, including the Game Boy Advance, PlayStation 2, PS2 Games Archives Portable, Nintendo DS and Xbox 360. the latest being Namco Museum Archives Vol. 2, released in 2020.

The Namco Museum name was originally used for a chain of retail stores in the 1980s, which sold merchandise based on Namco video games and characters.[1] The compilations include video games developed by Namco for both arcade hardware and home game systems, including the Family Computer and Sega Genesis. Some iterations use software emulation for the games, while others instead reprogram them from scratch. The collections typically include interchangeable PS2 Games Archives settings, online leaderboards or unlockable extras, such as games or promotional material. The original PlayStation series, with the exception of Namco Museum Encore, instead placed the player in a virtual museum that housed the individual games.

The Namco Museum series has been met with a mixed to positive critical response, PS2 Games Archives, some praising the emulation quality and unlockable extras while others criticizing the overall presentation and lack of updated features to the included titles. The franchise has sold a total of more than 14 million copies worldwide.

Games[edit]

Namco Museum Vol. 1Encore (1995–1998)[edit]

Six Namco Museum volumes were released for the PlayStation from 1995 to 1998, including one (Namco Museum Encore) that was released only in Japan. When Namco unveiled Volume 5 at the November 1996 PlayStation Expo, it was announced that it would be the final volume in the series,[2] hence the sixth volume's title, "Encore", PS2 Games Archives. The first five volumes pose a 3D virtual museum that players are able to walk around in, with each game being stored in an "exhibit" room. In these museums, players can view conceptual artwork, marketing material, arcade system boards, and other material relating to the included games. Encore replaces the museum with a standard menu system. The means by which Namco recreated the games for the PlayStation hardware is unclear; the arcade game conversions contain pieces of the original game data but none of the original source code, suggesting they are object-level recreations.[3]

The control systems of each of the games were well-preserved, PS2 Games Archives. However, since the PlayStation's analog controller was not available at the time, analog control for Pole Position and Pole Position II is only supported in these compilations by Namco's neGcon joypad.

In Japan, Vol. 2 had a special edition box set that included replica promotional cards and PS2 Games Archives Namco Volume Controller.[citation needed] A limited edition of Namco Museum Encore was PS2 Games Archives with a case designed to hold the PS2 Games Archives volumes in the series plus a memory card.[4] All six volumes were added to the Japanese PlayStation Store as PSOne Classics. Volumes 1 to 4 were released on December 11, 2013 while Vol. 5 and Encore were released on December 18, 2013. The five numbered installments were added to the North American PlayStation Store on September 30, 2014.

Volume Release date Games included
Japan North America Europe
Namco Museum Vol. 1November 22, 1995 July 31, 1996 August 17, 1996 Pac-Man (1980) Rally-X (1980) New Rally-X (1981) Galaga (1981) Bosconian (1981) Pole Position (1982) Toy Pop (1986)
Namco Museum Vol. 2February 9, 1996 September 30, 1996 November 22, 1996 Cutie Q (1979) [note 1]Xevious (1983) Mappy (1983) Gaplus (1984) Grobda (1984) Dragon Buster (1985) Bomb Beedagger (1979)
Namco Museum Vol. 3June 21, 1996 January 31, 1997 February 12, 1997 Galaxian (1979) Ms. Pac-Man (1982) Dig Dug (1982) Phozon (1983) Pole Position II (1983) The Tower of Druaga (1984) N/A
Namco Museum Vol. 4November 8, PS2 Games Archives, 1996 June 30, 1997 August 18, 1997 Pac-Land (1984) The Return PS2 Games Archives Ishtar (1986) Genpei Tōma Den (1986) Ordyne (1988) Assault (1988) Assault Plusdagger (1988) N/A
Namco Museum Vol. 5February 28, 1997 November 26, 1997 February 26, 1998 Metro-Cross (1985) Baraduke (1985) Dragon Spirit (1987) Pac-Mania (1987) Valkyrie no Densetsu (1989) N/A N/A
Namco Museum EncoreOctober 30, 1997 N/A N/A King & Balloon (1980) Motos (1985) Sky Kid (1985) Rolling Thunder (1986) Wonder Momo (1987) Rompers (1989) Dragon Saber (1990)
dagger indicates a hidden game. In addition, Bomb Bee is unavailable outside of Japan.
  1. ^In releases outside of Japan, Super Pac-Man (1982) replaces Cutie Q.

Namco Museum 64 (N64) and Namco Museum (DC, GBA)[edit]

1999 video game

Namco Museum 64 for Nintendo 64 and Namco Museum for Dreamcast and Game Boy Advance are the first compilations in the series to omit a virtual museum. The GBA version was released worldwide, while other versions were exclusive to North America, and was a launch title for the system in North America.[5] The following games, originally featured in Namco Museum Vol. 1 and Namco Museum Vol. 3 for the PlayStation, are included:

The GBA version does not retain high scores when powered off, which is also the case with Pac-Man Collection. On the Wii UVirtual Console, however, the Restore Point feature saves scores for both games. The N64 version requires a Controller Pak with eight free pages and one free slot to save high scores and settings. The Dreamcast version requires a VMU with eight free blocks for saving progress, while also offering an mini-game that's exclusive to the VMU titled Pac-It, with gameplay similar to Kaboom!.

In the United States, Namco Museum for the Game Boy Advance sold 2.4 million copies and earned $37 million by August pratik Archives. During the period between January 2000 and August 2006, it was the third-highest-selling game for handheld game consoles in that country.[6]

Namco Museum (PlayStation 2, Xbox, Nintendo GameCube)[edit]

This version marks the first time an entry has been released on PlayStation 2, Xbox, and GameCube. It was first released in 2001 on PlayStation 2, followed by Xbox and Nintendo GameCube in 2002.

The collection on these consoles includes all the games from Namco Museum 64 and Namco Museum for Dreamcast PS2 Games Archives

This edition of Namco Museum is the first collection in the series to include a game that originated on home consoles (Pac-Attack, originally released on the Genesis and the Super NES and also previously included in the Japanese-only Namco Anthology Vol. 2, PS2 Games Archives, and Pac-Man Collection). The version of Pac-Attack seen here also resembles the Genesis version, as opposed to the SNES version. This is distinguished by the music, which sounds like the Genesis version of the game.

The "Arrangement" games in the collection were originally on the arcade's Namco Classic Collection Vol. 1 and Vol. 2. The pitch of the music in Pac-Man Arrangement and Dig Dug Arrangement has been changed slightly from the Adobe Acrobat Pro Archives - Patch Cracks it is higher-pitched than in the arcade versions. This compilation was released only in North America on all three of the consoles on which it was released.

Namco Museum Battle Collection[edit]

Main article: Namco Museum Battle Collection

This title was released on the PlayStation Portable in 2005. It contains over twenty of Namco's games such as Pac-Man (1980) and Galaga (1981). In addition, new "Arrangement" variants are available for Pac-Man, Galaga, New Rally-X (1981) and Dig Dug (1982), which have updated gameplay, graphics and can be played in a versus or co-operative mode using the PS2 Games Archives ad hoc feature. Game Sharing, a feature that had not yet been used on the PSP, was introduced in this game. This allowed others PSPs in the area to download the first few levels of some of the games.

The "Arrangement" games in this compilation are not the same as they were on the arcade's Namco Classic Collection Vol. 1 and Vol. 2. They are entirely new games that were designed to take advantage of the PSP's hardware and features.

The Japanese version is divided into two volumes, with the second containing three additional games: Dragon Spirit, Motos Arrangement and Pac-Man Arrangement Plus.

Namco Museum 50th Anniversary[edit]

2005 video game

Namco Museum 50th Anniversary
Developer(s)Digital Eclipse
Publisher(s)Namco
Electronic Arts (EU)
SeriesNamco Museum
Platform(s)PlayStation 2
Xbox
Nintendo GameCube
PC
Game Boy Advance
ReleasePlayStation 2XboxNintendo GameCubePCGame Boy Advance
Genre(s)Various
Mode(s)Single player, multiplayer

A special edition that marks Namco's founding as a toy manufacturing company in 1955. It was the second Namco Museum compilation to be released on the PlayStation 2, Xbox and the Nintendo GameCube, PS2 Games Archives. The Game Boy Advance version was also the second Namco Museum compilation for the GBA. It was also released on PC. In Japan, this was released under the title Namco Museum Arcade Hits! for PlayStation 2 only, with Pac-Mania and Galaga '88 unlocked right from the start and different menu music.

This compilation includes 16 games, except Windows 10 product id 00331 10000 00001 aa635 keygen the Game Boy Advance, which only includes five games:

dagger indicates the five games included in the Game Boy Advance version. This version is similar to the original Namco Museum for that console, which also includes five games and no score-saving capability. 50th Anniversary replaces Galaxian and PS2 Games Archives Position with Pac-Man PS2 Games Archives Rally-X.

This is the first edition of Namco Museum with actual arcade game emulation using the original game ROM images (although voice sounds in "Rolling Thunder", sounds for both "Pole Position" games and "Xevious" are stored in .wav files). Also, the GameCube version allows the player to insert a limited number of credits, about five or six, by repeatedly pressing the Z button when the game first starts, but then players can only exit to the main menu during gameplay. The PS2, Xbox, and PC versions allow the player to exit a game at any time, but skip being able to add credits. For Dragon Spirit, Pac-Mania and Galaga '88, the continue features from the original arcade versions have only been retained in the Windows PC version of the collection.

Namco Museum DS[edit]

Main article: Namco Museum DS

2007 video game

Namco Museum DS was released on September 18, 2007.

The collection includes ten games:

Super Xevious and the old version of Dig Hma vpn premium activation code  ❌ II are hidden games that must be found by browsing the menus for Xevious and Dig Dug II, respectively.

This game also allows access to each game's DIP switches, but some arcade-exclusive options are PS2 Games Archives out such as the "Rack-Test" on Pac-Man. It was re-released as part of a "Dual Pack" bundle with the DS version of Pac-Man World 3 in North America PS2 Games Archives October 30, 2012.

Namco Museum Remix[edit]

Main article: Namco Museum Remix

Namco Museum Remix was released on October 23, 2007 for Wii. This compilation has the original arcade versions of:

It also had "Remix" versions of certain games:

When played on multiplayer, the Miis are used, PS2 Games Archives. Galaga Remix on this compilation is not the same as the Galaga RemixiOS application.

Namco Museum Virtual Arcade[edit]

Main article: Namco Museum Virtual Arcade

2008 video game

This collection was released for the Xbox 360 on November 4, 2008, in North America, May 15, PS2 Games Archives, 2009, in Mindjet MindManager 21.1.392 + Crack Full [Latest-2022] Download, June PS2 Games Archives, 2009, in Australia and November 5, 2009, in Japan. Namco Museum Virtual Arcade is made up of two sets of games. The first is Xbox Live Arcade, which includes nine Xbox Live Arcade games. These are identical to the digital Xbox Live Arcade versions but are present on the game-disc. These games can be selected from the compilation's menu or, only while the game disc is in the console, accessed directly from the Xbox Live Arcade menu. The next set is Museum, which also includes Museum games, although these are the ones accessible directly from the disc. However, they do not come with achievements or online play. Namco Museum Virtual Arcade is the first Namco Museum game to include Sky Kid Deluxe (1986), while all of the rest were already or previously available on consoles. In common with other disc releases that include full Xbox Live Arcade games on-disc (like Xbox Live Arcade Unplugged for example), installation of the game disc to the Xbox 360 HDD is disallowed.

Xbox Live Arcade Games

Museum Games

The Arrangement games are the same as they were on Namco Museum Battle Iobit Advanced SystemCare 12 crack serial keygen for PSP, although New Rally-X Arrangement is not included in this compilation. Additionally, on all games, the original 2-player modes from the original arcade versions (where applicable) do not appear here; all games are one-player only. The Xbox Live Arcade games do not have multiplayer either with the exception of Mr. Driller Online's online mode. The Xbox Live Arcade games can only be played when the disc is inside the system. The games must be downloaded from Xbox Live Marketplace for their regular prices in order for the games to be retained in the system's game library.

Namco Museum Essentials[edit]

Main article: Namco Museum Essentials

2009 video game

Namco Museum Essentials was released on January 29, 2009.[7] It includes:

PlayStation Home included a virtual arcade space with sample versions of the games.
The PlayStation Store also had a free trial version that only includes the first at the few levels of:

Both the demo and the full version were delisted from the PlayStation Store on March 15, 2018.

Namco Museum Megamix[edit]

Main article: Namco Museum Remix

An updated version of Namco Museum Remix for the Wii, which was released on November 16, 2010 in North America only. It adds additional arcade games and an additional "Remix" game. It adds a level select feature to all of the arcade games except Cutie Q.

Arcade Games

Remix Games

Namco Museum (Nintendo Switch)[edit]

2017 video game

Simply titled Namco Museum, it was developed for the Nintendo Switch and released on Tag: acoustica mixcraft pro studio 9.0 build 436 28, 2017 on the Nintendo eShop. Much like Namco Museum DS, the game includes a remake of Pac-Man Vs.. It contains the following games:

Due to the violent nature of Splatterhouse, this is the first Namco Museum game to be rated T for Teen by the Entertainment Software Rating Board.[8] A retail release bundled with Pac-Man Championship Edition 2 Plus, titled Namco Museum Arcade Pac, was released on September 28, 2018.[9]

Namco Museum Mini Player[edit]

Namco Museum Mini Player is a dedicatedhandheld console shaped like a miniature arcade cabinet developed by My Arcade that includes 20 Namco games and was released by Bandai Namco Entertainment on June 24, 2019.[10] While it includes some games that originated on home consoles, the games included that did originate in arcades are based on their original arcade versions. The games included are:

Namco Museum Collection[edit]

Namco Museum Collection is a series of video game compilations for the Evercade handheld console which was released on May 22, 2020.[11]

Unlike other compilations, the games in these compilations are based on their home console versions (NES/Famicom, SNES/Super Famicom, and SEGA Genesis/Mega Drive) rather than arcade versions.

Collection 1[edit]

Collection 2[edit]

Namco Museum Archives[edit]

Main article: Namcot Collection

Namco Museum Archives Vol. 1 and Namco Museum Archives Vol. 2 were both released on June 18, 2020 for the Xbox One, PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, PS2 Games Archives, and Steam outside of Japan. Developed by M2 and B.B. Studio. The two volumes are localized versions of the Japanese compilation Namcot Collection, featuring Namco-published games for the Nintendo Entertainment System and Family Computer. Vol. 1 contains an 8-bit demake of Pac-Man Championship Edition, and Vol. 2 contains a homebrew conversion of Gaplus.

Vol. 1[edit]

Vol. 2[edit]

Reception[edit]

In August 1996, Namco claimed accumulated sales of 600,000 units for the Namco Museum series in Japan alone.[35] In the United States, The NPD Group in 2010 listed Namco Museum among the all-time top ten best-selling video games in the United States.[36] The franchise has sold a total of at least 14.087 million copies worldwide.[n 1]

The four reviewers of Electronic Gaming Monthly gave Volume 1 an 8.125 out of 10, citing the excellent quality of the emulation and the interesting PS2 Games Archives museum content. Mark Lefebvre summarized that "Namco has given gamers what they've always been asking for: old titles."[45]Next Generation PS2 Games Archives complimented the emulation quality and the virtual museum, and concluded that for those interested in retro compilations, "this is as good as this sort of thing gets." They scored it four out of five stars.[46]Maximum gave it three out of five stars, reasoning that "On the one hand, PS2 Games Archives, this is a collection of six indisputably classic games, three of which rank among the most influential titles in the history of videogames. On the other hand, all the games on the disk are over ten years old, and influential or not, they're definitely well past their sell by date. Pole Position may have revolutionised the racing genre in 1982, but would you really choose to play it over Ridge Racer Revolution in 1996?"[47] While GamePro found that all of the games save ToyPop remained great fun, the reviewer criticized the absence of the voice samples from Pole Position and compared the 3D museum unfavorably to the bonus content in Williams Arcade's Greatest Hits. He concluded the compilation to be worth renting at the least, and a must-have for retro gaming fans.[48]

Reviews for Volume 2 were also mixed to positive, though most critics found the selection of games weaker than that of Volume 1. The four reviewers of Electronic Gaming Monthly gave Volume 2 a 7.125 out of 10, with all four remarking that the compilation had two or three genuine classics, with the remaining three or four games being mediocre PS2 Games Archives overly obscure. However, they disagreed on which games fell into which group; for example, Dan Hsu said that "Super Pac-Man stinks", while Crispin Boyer called it "the best reason to buy NM2" and "the height of the yellow pellet-eater's evolution."[49]Jeff Gerstmann of GameSpot similarly commented, "While Mappy, Xevious, Gaplus, and Super Pac-Man are infinitely playable, the lesser-known Grobda and Dragon Buster are mediocre at best." He gave the compilation a 7.1 out of 10, praising the charm of the antiquated graphics and sound effects and the still potent gameplay.[50]Next Generation picked Grobda, Dragon Buster, and Mappy as the mediocre games in the compilation, reasoning that "all are examples of game genres that have evolved way beyond these originals, and with good reason." They scored it two out of five stars.[51] In direct contradiction to GameSpot and Next Generation, GamePro said that of the six games, "Super Pac-Man's weak control makes it the biggest disappointment, while Dragon Buster's action/adventure swordplay and Grobda's rapid-fire tank shooting hold up the best." They recommended the compilation for "those who enjoy simple, classic gameplay".[52]

Volume 3 continued the trend of increasingly mixed reviews for the series. Jeff Gerstmann and Next Generation both commented that Dig Dug, Ms. Pac-Man, and Galaxian are genuine classics, Pole Position II is good but suffers from the absence of PS2 Games Archives voice clips from the arcade version, The Tower of Druaga has aged poorly, and Phozon was a terrible game to begin with. However, while Gerstmann concluded the collection to be "a real letdown" after the first two volumes and advised gamers to skip it, giving it a 5.6 out of 10,[53]Next Generation concluded that "the number of true classics on Volume 3 outweigh the ones that never should have been unearthed", and gave it three out of five stars.[54]GamePro approved of both the entire set of games and the quality of the emulation, and deemed Volume 3 "must-have arcade fun".[55] Though Electronic Gaming Monthly never reviewed Volume 3, they named it a runner-up for "Best Compilation" (behind Street Fighter Collection) at their 1997 Editors' Choice Awards.[56]

Volume 4 saw a particularly steep decline in the series' critical standing, with most critics agreeing that of the five games included, only Ordyne and Assault were at all worthwhile.[57][58] Gerstmann gave it a 4.5 out of 10, and said the collection "is just plain depressing. It contains five games, and most of them are little known games that were little known for a reason."[57]Electronic Gaming Monthly's review team gave it a 5.75 out of 10. The team was evenly split: Shawn Smith and Crispin Boyer, each voting a 6.5 out of 10, found the interesting museum content and the two or three enjoyable games make the collection worthwhile, while Dan Hsu and Sushi-X both gave it a 5.0 and said it was a disappointment compared to the earlier volumes.[58] Both Gerstmann and GamePro commented that the first three volumes of Namco Museum had exhausted the series concept and Namco's backlog of genuine classics, and that Namco should have let the series end with volume 3.[57][59]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^Japanese: ナムコミュージアム, Hepburn: Namuko Myūjiamu
  2. ^Released under the Namco brand name outside North America.
  3. ^Released under the Namco brand name outside North America.

References[edit]

  1. ^Namco Museum series:
    • Namco Museum Vol. 1 sales: 1.65 million units[37]
    • Namco Museum Vol. 3 sales: 2.24 million units[37]
    • Namco Museum series Japan sales: 1 million (1998)[38]
    • Namco Museum Encore sales: 51,303 units[39]
    • Namco Museum 64 sales: 1.04 million units[37]
    • Namco Museum (GBA) sales: 2.96 million units[37]
    • Namco Museum (PS2) sales: ≈1.80 million units[37]
    • Namco Museum 50th Anniversary sales: 241,000 units[40]
    • Namco Museum Battle Collection Japan sales: 79,527 units[41]
    • Namco Museum Vol. 2 (PSP) sales: 24,934 units[42]
    • Namco Museum DS Japan sales: 33,393 units[43]
    • Namco Museum Remix Japan sales (first week): 1,700 units[39]
    • Namco Museum Virtual Arcade Japan sales (first week): 5,912 units[44]
  1. ^"Namco Product Catalog". Namco Ltd. 1984. Retrieved 20 July 2019.
  2. ^"PlayStation: Namco Steals the Show with Five New Arcade Conversions!". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 90. Ziff Davis. January 1997. p. 108.
  3. ^"Letters". Next Generation. No. 30. Imagine Media. June 1997. p. 133.
  4. ^"Behind the Screens: The Namco Games Chronicle". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 102. Ziff Davis. January 1998. p. 94.
  5. ^"Namco's US Launch Title". IGN. April 19, 2001. Retrieved December 6, 2017.
  6. ^Keiser, Joe (August 2, 2006). "The Century's Top 50 Handheld Games". Next Generation. Archived from the original on October 10, 2007.
  7. ^"IGN: Namco Museum Essentials Preview". IGN.
  8. ^"NAMCO MUSEUM". www.nintendo.com. Retrieved 2017-07-13.
  9. ^"Namco Museum Arcade Pac is a 2-in-1 Bundle Coming Exclusively to Switch". 2 July 2018.
  10. ^Bradley, Alan (28 May 2019), PS2 Games Archives. "The Namco Museum Mini Player is a tiny arcade for your desk", PS2 Games Archives. PS2 Games Archives. Retrieved 18 September 2021.
  11. ^http://evercade.co.uk/
  12. ^"Namco Museum PS2 Games Archives. 1 Reviews". GameRankings. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  13. ^"Namco Museum Vol. 2 Reviews". GameRankings. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  14. ^"Namco Museum Vol. 3 Reviews". GameRankings. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  15. ^"Namco Museum Vol. 4 Reviews". GameRankings. Retrieved June 28, PS2 Games Archives Museum Vol. 5 Reviews". GameRankings. Retrieved June 28, PS2 Games Archives, 2013.
  16. ^"Namco Museum 64 Reviews". GameRankings. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  17. ^"Namco Museum Reviews". GameRankings. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  18. ^"Namco Museum". Metacritic. Retrieved June 29, 2013.
  19. ^"Namco Museum". Metacritic. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  20. ^"Namco Museum". Metacritic. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  21. ^"Namco Museum". Metacritic. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  22. ^"Namco Museum Battle Collection". Metacritic. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  23. ^"Namco Museum: 50th Anniversary". Metacritic. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  24. ^"Namco Museum: 50th Anniversary". Metacritic. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  25. ^"Namco Museum: 50th Anniversary". Metacritic. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  26. ^"Namco Museum: 50th Anniversary". Metacritic. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  27. ^"Namco Museum: 50th Anniversary". Metacritic. Retrieved June 29, 2013.
  28. ^"Namco Museum DS". Metacritic. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  29. ^"Namco Museum Remix". Metacritic. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  30. ^"Namco Museum Virtual Arcade". Metacritic. Retrieved June 29, 2013.
  31. ^"Namco Museum Essentials", PS2 Games Archives. Metacritic. Retrieved June 29, 2013.
  32. ^"Namco Museum Megamix". Metacritic. Retrieved June 29, 2013.
  33. ^"Namco Museum (Switch)". GameRankings. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  34. ^"Tokyo Game Show '96: Japan Shows Off". Next Generation. No. 24. Imagine Media. December 1996. p. 16.
  35. ^Thorsen, Tor (January 21, PS2 Games Archives, 2010). "NPD: Wii Play top US best-seller to date". GameSpot. Retrieved 2021-11-01.
  36. ^ abcde"US Platinum Videogame Chart". The Magic Box. Retrieved 25 May 2019.
  37. ^"ナムコ、ファンの要望に応え、「ナムコミュージアム」 シリーズ最新作1980~1990年の名作ビデオゲームを完全移植した PS用ゲームソフト「ナムコミュージアムアンコール」を10月30日発売" (in Japanese). Bandai Namco Entertainment. October 28, 1997. Archived from the original on April 21, 2021. Retrieved April 21, PS2 Games Archives, 2021.
  38. ^ ab"Game Search (based on Famitsu data)". Game Data Library. March PS2 Games Archives, 2020. Archived from PS2 Games Archives original PS2 Games Archives April 24, 2019. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  39. ^"株式会社バンダイナムコホールディングス 2006 年 3 月期 中間決算説明要旨" (in Japanese). Bandai Namco Holdings. November 24, 2005. Archived from the original on May 15, 2019. Retrieved April 21, 2021.
  40. ^"Namco Museum". Garaph. Retrieved 24 February 2005.
  41. ^"Namco Museum Vol.2". Garaph. PS2 Games Archives 23 February 2006.
  42. ^"Namco Museum DS". Garaph. Retrieved 11 October 2007.
  43. ^"Namco Museum: Virtual Arcade". Garaph. Retrieved 5 November 2009.
  44. ^"Review Crew: Namco Arcade Classics". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 82. Sendai Publishing. May 1996. p. 34.
  45. ^"Namco Museum Vol. 1". Next Generation. 7 Data Recovery crack serial keygen. Imagine Media. September 1996. SoftPerfect Network Scanner 8.1.1 Crack Full Version Download Reviews: Namco Museum Volume 1". Maximum: The Video Game Magazine. No. 5. Emap International Limited. April 1996. p. 157.
  46. ^Tommy Glide (September 1996). "Proreview: Namco's Museum Volume 1". GamePro. No. 96. IDG. p. 64.
  47. ^"Review Crew: Namco Museum Vol. 2". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 88. Ziff Davis, PS2 Games Archives. November 1996. p. 84.
  48. ^Gerstmann, Jeff (December 13, 1996). "Namco Museum Volume 2 Review". GameSpot. Retrieved 22 November 2017.
  49. ^"Namco's Museum Volume 2", PS2 Games Archives. Next Generation. No. 24. Imagine Media. December 1996. p. 256.
  50. ^Doctor Devon (December 1996). "ProReview: Namco Museum Vol. 2". GamePro. No. 99. IDG. p. 130.
  51. ^Gerstmann, Jeff (March 11, 1997). "Namco Museum Volume 3 Review". GameSpot. Retrieved 12 June 2018.
  52. ^"Namco Museum Volume 3". Next Generation. No. 27. Imagine Media. March 1997. p. 86.
  53. ^Dr. Zombie (March 1997). "PlayStation ProReview: Namco Museum Volume 3", PS2 Games Archives. GamePro. No. 102. IDG. p. 78.
  54. ^"Editors' Choice Awards". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 104. Ziff Davis. March 1998. p. 96.
  55. ^ abcGerstmann, Jeff (August 5, 1997). "Namco Museum Volume 4 Review". GameSpot. Retrieved 1 November 2018.
  56. ^ ab"Review Crew: Namco Museum Volume 4". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 96. Ziff Davis. July 1997. p. 54.
  57. ^Art Angel (August 1997). "PlayStation ProReview: Namco Museum Volume 4". GamePro. No. 107. IDG. p. 72.
Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Playstation 2

27 Articles

The PS2 has recently entered the point where there’s a lot of cheap gems our there as a lot of gamers have moved away from the system, but not in full “retro mode” of collecting yet.  Despite its relatively young vintage and its widespread popularity, there’s still plenty of in-demand rarities and exclusives commanding strong […]

The next update to the Cheapest Games series is a look at the Playstation 2′s wonderful library.  There are quite a lot of PS2 games now that are absolute steals considering the quality of the games.  As we see more titles show up as re-releases and downloadable classics on the PS3 and more people moving away […]

Presented by Ack When people think survival horror, they PS2 Games Archives to think of the classics: late night game sessions with Resident Evil or Silent Hill on the PlayStation, nightmares from Alone in the Dark on the 3DO, scaring themselves silly with Eternal Darkness on the Nintendo Gamecube.  But the PlayStation 2 deserves some of the […]

Presented by BulletMagnet Note from racketboy: Once again, it’s a pleasure to have BulletMagnet back to guide us through another blockbuster shmup library.  His guides to the Sega Saturn and Playstation Shmup Libraries are required reading for those looking to explore the genre.  This time he looks at some more modern, but equally thrilling shooters […]

Robot Alchemic Drive Screenshot

If you’ve played all the blockbuster games on the PS2 (or PS3) already and need to dig into the lesser-known-but-equally-exciting games, this is the guide for you.  I’ve had long discussions with many experienced PS2 owners in order to determine a list of all the best PS2 games that most people haven’t played (or possibly […]

The whole “Sony-killed-Sega” topic is a sensitive subject for old-school Sega fans. Sure, Sega had plenty of self-inflicted wounds, but in the back of every Sega junky’s mind is the fact the Sega rushed the Saturn to market to preempt the Playstation and the PS2 hype made the Dreamcast’s phenomenal head-start fizzle out quicker than […]

The Red Star Screenshot

In PS2 Games Archives response to many requests, I’m starting a new series covering the best modern 2D games for newer consoles. Since it is the most common and well-rounded of the modern consoles, PS2 Games Archives, I’m starting with the Playstation 2. I also find it an ironic place to start as Sony was has always been protective about […]

When you add a console to your collection, the first thing you want to do is get a handful of games to keep you busy with your new toy. However, most of us can’t spend afford to spend fat PS2 Games Archives of cash for a few games. This budget-friendly list should help you quickly find which […]

When there are a number of home versions of a classic game, you can’t help but wonder which version is the best. For older games, it is very hard to find some solid comparisons of various ports. Fortunately, every now and then I stumble across someone who is dedicated to a certain game and documents […]

As a victim of Acclaim’s financial problems, The Red Star was delayed many times and been cancelled at least once. However, XS Games took over the project as it’s publisher and released this shmups/beatemup hybrid game as a budget title for the PS2. Ever since I first laid eyes on The Red Star back when […]

The Sega Genesis Collection has apparently emerged as one of the best classic PS2 Games Archives compilations of all time. (If there was a Gamecube version, I would buy it for myself). I was pretty happy to see our friends at X-Play have taken the time to share the Genesis Collection with its television audience and provided […]

It isn’t every day that a beautiful 2D game gets released on a home console. It is even less frequent that such games make it out of Japan and reach the English-speaking marketplace, PS2 Games Archives. However, Odin Sphere is a side-scrolling action RPG from Altus Software that is not only on its way to the Playstation 2, […]

One of the great things about the Playstation 2 at launch was the ability to not only play a huge library of PS1 games on the new console, but the graphics also had some slight enhancements. Nearly everything was compatible and looked great. Unfortunately, that has PS2 Games Archives been the case with the new Playstation 3. […]

With all the hype over the retro downloads on the Wii’s Virtual Console and the XBox Live Arcade, many gamers have completely missed PS2 Games Archives release of the Sega Genesis Collection for the PS2. For once, Sega has gotten the clue and included a health spoonful of top-notch Genesis classics on one compliation. While not every […]

The Dreamcast had a long string of 2D shooters that continued long after the console left the retail scence in most countries. Trizeal was developed by Triangle Service, a small Japanese developer, PS2 Games Archives, and was ported to the Dreamcast in 2005 from the NAOMI arcade platform, making it one of the officially licensed games to be […]

Page 1 of 212»

Get a nice roundup of new retro gaming content once or twice a month.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]
PS2 Games Archives

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Criminally Underrated PS2 Games

PS2 Games Archives - life

Redump - Sony Playstation 2 - USA - Part 1

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Reviews

Reviewer:CMV1994- favorite- October 2, 2021
Subject:Torrent showing only 60GB of files! PLEASE FIX IT!!!

Please fix or reupload this torrent! When i open it in client it shows only 60GB. Around 850GB of data is missing!

Reviewer:Olddantrucker- favorite- September 14, 2021
Subject:Why does Archive.org suck at torrents?

Are they on drugs or something? Since drugs are decriminalized now I can see that becoming a BIG problem further contributing to the 'web rot' phenomena.

Reviewer:Doomtrigger- favoritefavorite- September 6, 2021
Subject:torrents not showing all games stops at a..

Dont know why the torrents are broken

Reviewer:Unforgivenll- favoritefavoritefavorite- June 19, 2021
Subject:Good Download?

This probably is a fine set, but all the bin files have been renamed so that they don't match the original cue file. What good reason could you have for doing that? The formating for the titles do not really make sense either. Why would you put a space between the filename and the file type? All of the files read like this "Crash Bandicoot .bin". Weird nonsensical decisions here. I appreciate the contribution though, thank you, Unfortunately after downloading 2tb plus, I will have to go with a proper set.

Reviewer:Paultimate79- favoritefavoritefavoritefavoritefavorite- March 11, 2021
Subject:Torrent

archive.or makes the torrent automatically. not the uploader.

Reviewer:Ion88- favoritefavoritefavorite- July 5, 2020
Subject:Missing Titles in .torrent file

Amazing archive first and foremost!

But I have run into a problem with trying to run the torrent file, the torrent itself only seems to go up to 2/3 of 'a' and is missing the rest of the archive.

Anyway that can be updated to show the correct number of games?

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Sony Tab

PS2 Game Collection EUR (# - A)LinkPS2 Game Collection EUR (A - B)LinkPS2 Game Collection EUR (B)LinkPS2 Game Collection EUR (B - C)LinkPS2 Game Collection EUR (C - D)LinkPS2 Game Collection EUR (D)LinkPS2 Game Collection EUR (D)LinkPS2 Game Collection EUR (D - F)LinkPS2 Game Collection EUR (F)LinkPS2 Game Collection EUR (F - G)LinkPS2 Game Collection EUR (G - H)LinkPS2 Game Collection EUR (I - K)LinkPS2 Game Collection EUR (K - M)LinkPS2 Game Collection EUR (M)LinkPS2 Game Collection EUR (M - N)LinkPS2 Game Collection EUR (N - O)LinkPS2 Game Collection EUR (O)LinkPS2 Game Collection EUR (O - P)LinkPS2 Game Collection EUR (P - R)LinkPS2 Game Collection EUR (R - S)LinkPS2 Game Collection EUR (S)LinkPS2 Game Collection EUR (S)LinkPS2 Game Collection EUR (S)LinkPS2 Game Collection EUR (S)LinkPS2 Game Collection EUR (S - T)LinkPS2 Game Collection EUR (T)LinkPS2 Game Collection EUR (T - Z)Link
Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Playstation 2

27 Articles

The PS2 has recently entered the point where there’s a lot of cheap gems our there as a lot of gamers have moved away from the system, but not in full “retro mode” of collecting yet.  Despite its relatively young vintage and its widespread popularity, there’s still plenty of in-demand rarities and exclusives commanding strong […]

The next update to the Cheapest Games series is a look at the Playstation 2′s wonderful library.  There are quite a lot of PS2 games now that are absolute steals considering the quality of the games.  As we see more titles show up as re-releases and downloadable classics on the PS3 and more people moving away […]

Presented by Ack When people think survival horror, they tend to think of the classics: late night game sessions with Resident Evil or Silent Hill on the PlayStation, nightmares from Alone in the Dark on the 3DO, scaring themselves silly with Eternal Darkness on the Nintendo Gamecube.  But the PlayStation 2 deserves some of the […]

Presented by BulletMagnet Note from racketboy: Once again, it’s a pleasure to have BulletMagnet back to guide us through another blockbuster shmup library.  His guides to the Sega Saturn and Playstation Shmup Libraries are required reading for those looking to explore the genre.  This time he looks at some more modern, but equally thrilling shooters […]

Robot Alchemic Drive Screenshot

If you’ve played all the blockbuster games on the PS2 (or PS3) already and need to dig into the lesser-known-but-equally-exciting games, this is the guide for you.  I’ve had long discussions with many experienced PS2 owners in order to determine a list of all the best PS2 games that most people haven’t played (or possibly […]

The whole “Sony-killed-Sega” topic is a sensitive subject for old-school Sega fans. Sure, Sega had plenty of self-inflicted wounds, but in the back of every Sega junky’s mind is the fact the Sega rushed the Saturn to market to preempt the Playstation and the PS2 hype made the Dreamcast’s phenomenal head-start fizzle out quicker than […]

The Red Star Screenshot

In a response to many requests, I’m starting a new series covering the best modern 2D games for newer consoles. Since it is the most common and well-rounded of the modern consoles, I’m starting with the Playstation 2. I also find it an ironic place to start as Sony was has always been protective about […]

When you add a console to your collection, the first thing you want to do is get a handful of games to keep you busy with your new toy. However, most of us can’t spend afford to spend fat pile of cash for a few games. This budget-friendly list should help you quickly find which […]

When there are a number of home versions of a classic game, you can’t help but wonder which version is the best. For older games, it is very hard to find some solid comparisons of various ports. Fortunately, every now and then I stumble across someone who is dedicated to a certain game and documents […]

As a victim of Acclaim’s financial problems, The Red Star was delayed many times and been cancelled at least once. However, XS Games took over the project as it’s publisher and released this shmups/beatemup hybrid game as a budget title for the PS2. Ever since I first laid eyes on The Red Star back when […]

The Sega Genesis Collection has apparently emerged as one of the best classic game compilations of all time. (If there was a Gamecube version, I would buy it for myself). I was pretty happy to see our friends at X-Play have taken the time to share the Genesis Collection with its television audience and provided […]

It isn’t every day that a beautiful 2D game gets released on a home console. It is even less frequent that such games make it out of Japan and reach the English-speaking marketplace. However, Odin Sphere is a side-scrolling action RPG from Altus Software that is not only on its way to the Playstation 2, […]

One of the great things about the Playstation 2 at launch was the ability to not only play a huge library of PS1 games on the new console, but the graphics also had some slight enhancements. Nearly everything was compatible and looked great. Unfortunately, that has not been the case with the new Playstation 3. […]

With all the hype over the retro downloads on the Wii’s Virtual Console and the XBox Live Arcade, many gamers have completely missed the release of the Sega Genesis Collection for the PS2. For once, Sega has gotten the clue and included a health spoonful of top-notch Genesis classics on one compliation. While not every […]

The Dreamcast had a long string of 2D shooters that continued long after the console left the retail scence in most countries. Trizeal was developed by Triangle Service, a small Japanese developer, and was ported to the Dreamcast in 2005 from the NAOMI arcade platform, making it one of the officially licensed games to be […]

Page 1 of 212»

Get a nice roundup of new retro gaming content once or twice a month.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

After digging through archives for almost a year, a video game preservation group has now rescued and released more than 700 previously unreleased prototype games and demos for the PlayStation 2.

Falling under what The Hidden Palace calls “Project Deluge,” the more than 700 titles were showcased across a six-hour Twitch stream, which you can watch over on the group’s channel. The entire inventory of games amounted to over 850GB of data and focuses specifically on unreleased prototypes and demos as well as unreleased revisions of various games. Some of the titles were presented at past E3s and other conventions but never made it to a full launch. Big names in the library include Crash Bandicoot: The Wrath of CortexShadow of the ColossusGod HandDino Stalker, Final Fantasy X-2Dragon’s Lair 3D, and Legacy of Kain: Soul Reaver 2.

For those interested in checking the huge treasure trove of retro games out, you can head over to The Hidden Palace’s website.

Elsewhere in gaming, an Age of Empires IV fan preview is coming early next month.

Read Full Article

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Namco Museum

Series of compilation games

Video game series

Namco Museum
Namco Museum logo.png
Genre(s)Various
Developer(s)
Publisher(s)
Platform(s)PlayStation, Nintendo 64, Dreamcast, Game Boy Advance, PlayStation 2, Xbox, GameCube, PlayStation Portable, Microsoft Windows, Nintendo DS, Wii, Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
First releaseNamco Museum Vol. 1
November 22, 1995
Latest releaseNamco Museum Archives Vol. 2
June 18, 2020

Namco Museum[a] is a series of video game compilations developed and published by Bandai Namco Entertainment for home video game consoles. The first title in the series, Namco Museum Vol. 1, was released for the PlayStation in 1995. Entries in the series have been released for multiple platforms, including the Game Boy Advance, PlayStation 2, PlayStation Portable, Nintendo DS and Xbox 360. the latest being Namco Museum Archives Vol. 2, released in 2020.

The Namco Museum name was originally used for a chain of retail stores in the 1980s, which sold merchandise based on Namco video games and characters.[1] The compilations include video games developed by Namco for both arcade hardware and home game systems, including the Family Computer and Sega Genesis. Some iterations use software emulation for the games, while others instead reprogram them from scratch. The collections typically include interchangeable game settings, online leaderboards or unlockable extras, such as games or promotional material. The original PlayStation series, with the exception of Namco Museum Encore, instead placed the player in a virtual museum that housed the individual games.

The Namco Museum series has been met with a mixed to positive critical response, some praising the emulation quality and unlockable extras while others criticizing the overall presentation and lack of updated features to the included titles. The franchise has sold a total of more than 14 million copies worldwide.

Games[edit]

Namco Museum Vol. 1Encore (1995–1998)[edit]

Six Namco Museum volumes were released for the PlayStation from 1995 to 1998, including one (Namco Museum Encore) that was released only in Japan. When Namco unveiled Volume 5 at the November 1996 PlayStation Expo, it was announced that it would be the final volume in the series,[2] hence the sixth volume's title, "Encore". The first five volumes pose a 3D virtual museum that players are able to walk around in, with each game being stored in an "exhibit" room. In these museums, players can view conceptual artwork, marketing material, arcade system boards, and other material relating to the included games. Encore replaces the museum with a standard menu system. The means by which Namco recreated the games for the PlayStation hardware is unclear; the arcade game conversions contain pieces of the original game data but none of the original source code, suggesting they are object-level recreations.[3]

The control systems of each of the games were well-preserved. However, since the PlayStation's analog controller was not available at the time, analog control for Pole Position and Pole Position II is only supported in these compilations by Namco's neGcon joypad.

In Japan, Vol. 2 had a special edition box set that included replica promotional cards and the Namco Volume Controller.[citation needed] A limited edition of Namco Museum Encore was bundled with a case designed to hold the six volumes in the series plus a memory card.[4] All six volumes were added to the Japanese PlayStation Store as PSOne Classics. Volumes 1 to 4 were released on December 11, 2013 while Vol. 5 and Encore were released on December 18, 2013. The five numbered installments were added to the North American PlayStation Store on September 30, 2014.

Volume Release date Games included
Japan North America Europe
Namco Museum Vol. 1November 22, 1995 July 31, 1996 August 17, 1996 Pac-Man (1980) Rally-X (1980) New Rally-X (1981) Galaga (1981) Bosconian (1981) Pole Position (1982) Toy Pop (1986)
Namco Museum Vol. 2February 9, 1996 September 30, 1996 November 22, 1996 Cutie Q (1979) [note 1]Xevious (1983) Mappy (1983) Gaplus (1984) Grobda (1984) Dragon Buster (1985) Bomb Beedagger (1979)
Namco Museum Vol. 3June 21, 1996 January 31, 1997 February 12, 1997 Galaxian (1979) Ms. Pac-Man (1982) Dig Dug (1982) Phozon (1983) Pole Position II (1983) The Tower of Druaga (1984) N/A
Namco Museum Vol. 4November 8, 1996 June 30, 1997 August 18, 1997 Pac-Land (1984) The Return of Ishtar (1986) Genpei Tōma Den (1986) Ordyne (1988) Assault (1988) Assault Plusdagger (1988) N/A
Namco Museum Vol. 5February 28, 1997 November 26, 1997 February 26, 1998 Metro-Cross (1985) Baraduke (1985) Dragon Spirit (1987) Pac-Mania (1987) Valkyrie no Densetsu (1989) N/A N/A
Namco Museum EncoreOctober 30, 1997 N/A N/A King & Balloon (1980) Motos (1985) Sky Kid (1985) Rolling Thunder (1986) Wonder Momo (1987) Rompers (1989) Dragon Saber (1990)
dagger indicates a hidden game. In addition, Bomb Bee is unavailable outside of Japan.
  1. ^In releases outside of Japan, Super Pac-Man (1982) replaces Cutie Q.

Namco Museum 64 (N64) and Namco Museum (DC, GBA)[edit]

1999 video game

Namco Museum 64 for Nintendo 64 and Namco Museum for Dreamcast and Game Boy Advance are the first compilations in the series to omit a virtual museum. The GBA version was released worldwide, while other versions were exclusive to North America, and was a launch title for the system in North America.[5] The following games, originally featured in Namco Museum Vol. 1 and Namco Museum Vol. 3 for the PlayStation, are included:

The GBA version does not retain high scores when powered off, which is also the case with Pac-Man Collection. On the Wii UVirtual Console, however, the Restore Point feature saves scores for both games. The N64 version requires a Controller Pak with eight free pages and one free slot to save high scores and settings. The Dreamcast version requires a VMU with eight free blocks for saving progress, while also offering an mini-game that's exclusive to the VMU titled Pac-It, with gameplay similar to Kaboom!.

In the United States, Namco Museum for the Game Boy Advance sold 2.4 million copies and earned $37 million by August 2006. During the period between January 2000 and August 2006, it was the third-highest-selling game for handheld game consoles in that country.[6]

Namco Museum (PlayStation 2, Xbox, Nintendo GameCube)[edit]

This version marks the first time an entry has been released on PlayStation 2, Xbox, and GameCube. It was first released in 2001 on PlayStation 2, followed by Xbox and Nintendo GameCube in 2002.

The collection on these consoles includes all the games from Namco Museum 64 and Namco Museum for Dreamcast plus:

This edition of Namco Museum is the first collection in the series to include a game that originated on home consoles (Pac-Attack, originally released on the Genesis and the Super NES and also previously included in the Japanese-only Namco Anthology Vol. 2, and Pac-Man Collection). The version of Pac-Attack seen here also resembles the Genesis version, as opposed to the SNES version. This is distinguished by the music, which sounds like the Genesis version of the game.

The "Arrangement" games in the collection were originally on the arcade's Namco Classic Collection Vol. 1 and Vol. 2. The pitch of the music in Pac-Man Arrangement and Dig Dug Arrangement has been changed slightly from the original: it is higher-pitched than in the arcade versions. This compilation was released only in North America on all three of the consoles on which it was released.

Namco Museum Battle Collection[edit]

Main article: Namco Museum Battle Collection

This title was released on the PlayStation Portable in 2005. It contains over twenty of Namco's games such as Pac-Man (1980) and Galaga (1981). In addition, new "Arrangement" variants are available for Pac-Man, Galaga, New Rally-X (1981) and Dig Dug (1982), which have updated gameplay, graphics and can be played in a versus or co-operative mode using the PSP's ad hoc feature. Game Sharing, a feature that had not yet been used on the PSP, was introduced in this game. This allowed others PSPs in the area to download the first few levels of some of the games.

The "Arrangement" games in this compilation are not the same as they were on the arcade's Namco Classic Collection Vol. 1 and Vol. 2. They are entirely new games that were designed to take advantage of the PSP's hardware and features.

The Japanese version is divided into two volumes, with the second containing three additional games: Dragon Spirit, Motos Arrangement and Pac-Man Arrangement Plus.

Namco Museum 50th Anniversary[edit]

2005 video game

Namco Museum 50th Anniversary
Developer(s)Digital Eclipse
Publisher(s)Namco
Electronic Arts (EU)
SeriesNamco Museum
Platform(s)PlayStation 2
Xbox
Nintendo GameCube
PC
Game Boy Advance
ReleasePlayStation 2XboxNintendo GameCubePCGame Boy Advance
Genre(s)Various
Mode(s)Single player, multiplayer

A special edition that marks Namco's founding as a toy manufacturing company in 1955. It was the second Namco Museum compilation to be released on the PlayStation 2, Xbox and the Nintendo GameCube. The Game Boy Advance version was also the second Namco Museum compilation for the GBA. It was also released on PC. In Japan, this was released under the title Namco Museum Arcade Hits! for PlayStation 2 only, with Pac-Mania and Galaga '88 unlocked right from the start and different menu music.

This compilation includes 16 games, except for the Game Boy Advance, which only includes five games:

dagger indicates the five games included in the Game Boy Advance version. This version is similar to the original Namco Museum for that console, which also includes five games and no score-saving capability. 50th Anniversary replaces Galaxian and Pole Position with Pac-Man and Rally-X.

This is the first edition of Namco Museum with actual arcade game emulation using the original game ROM images (although voice sounds in "Rolling Thunder", sounds for both "Pole Position" games and "Xevious" are stored in .wav files). Also, the GameCube version allows the player to insert a limited number of credits, about five or six, by repeatedly pressing the Z button when the game first starts, but then players can only exit to the main menu during gameplay. The PS2, Xbox, and PC versions allow the player to exit a game at any time, but skip being able to add credits. For Dragon Spirit, Pac-Mania and Galaga '88, the continue features from the original arcade versions have only been retained in the Windows PC version of the collection.

Namco Museum DS[edit]

Main article: Namco Museum DS

2007 video game

Namco Museum DS was released on September 18, 2007.

The collection includes ten games:

Super Xevious and the old version of Dig Dug II are hidden games that must be found by browsing the menus for Xevious and Dig Dug II, respectively.

This game also allows access to each game's DIP switches, but some arcade-exclusive options are left out such as the "Rack-Test" on Pac-Man. It was re-released as part of a "Dual Pack" bundle with the DS version of Pac-Man World 3 in North America on October 30, 2012.

Namco Museum Remix[edit]

Main article: Namco Museum Remix

Namco Museum Remix was released on October 23, 2007 for Wii. This compilation has the original arcade versions of:

It also had "Remix" versions of certain games:

When played on multiplayer, the Miis are used. Galaga Remix on this compilation is not the same as the Galaga RemixiOS application.

Namco Museum Virtual Arcade[edit]

Main article: Namco Museum Virtual Arcade

2008 video game

This collection was released for the Xbox 360 on November 4, 2008, in North America, May 15, 2009, in Europe, June 3, 2009, in Australia and November 5, 2009, in Japan. Namco Museum Virtual Arcade is made up of two sets of games. The first is Xbox Live Arcade, which includes nine Xbox Live Arcade games. These are identical to the digital Xbox Live Arcade versions but are present on the game-disc. These games can be selected from the compilation's menu or, only while the game disc is in the console, accessed directly from the Xbox Live Arcade menu. The next set is Museum, which also includes Museum games, although these are the ones accessible directly from the disc. However, they do not come with achievements or online play. Namco Museum Virtual Arcade is the first Namco Museum game to include Sky Kid Deluxe (1986), while all of the rest were already or previously available on consoles. In common with other disc releases that include full Xbox Live Arcade games on-disc (like Xbox Live Arcade Unplugged for example), installation of the game disc to the Xbox 360 HDD is disallowed.

Xbox Live Arcade Games

Museum Games

The Arrangement games are the same as they were on Namco Museum Battle Collection for PSP, although New Rally-X Arrangement is not included in this compilation. Additionally, on all games, the original 2-player modes from the original arcade versions (where applicable) do not appear here; all games are one-player only. The Xbox Live Arcade games do not have multiplayer either with the exception of Mr. Driller Online's online mode. The Xbox Live Arcade games can only be played when the disc is inside the system. The games must be downloaded from Xbox Live Marketplace for their regular prices in order for the games to be retained in the system's game library.

Namco Museum Essentials[edit]

Main article: Namco Museum Essentials

2009 video game

Namco Museum Essentials was released on January 29, 2009.[7] It includes:

PlayStation Home included a virtual arcade space with sample versions of the games.
The PlayStation Store also had a free trial version that only includes the first at the few levels of:

Both the demo and the full version were delisted from the PlayStation Store on March 15, 2018.

Namco Museum Megamix[edit]

Main article: Namco Museum Remix

An updated version of Namco Museum Remix for the Wii, which was released on November 16, 2010 in North America only. It adds additional arcade games and an additional "Remix" game. It adds a level select feature to all of the arcade games except Cutie Q.

Arcade Games

Remix Games

  • Grobda Remix (2010)
  • Pac-Motos (2007)
  • Pac 'n Roll Remix (2007)
  • Galaga Remix (2007) (completely different from the Galaga RemixiOS application)
  • Rally-X Remix (2007)
  • Gator Panic Remix (2007)

Namco Museum (Nintendo Switch)[edit]

2017 video game

Simply titled Namco Museum, it was developed for the Nintendo Switch and released on July 28, 2017 on the Nintendo eShop. Much like Namco Museum DS, the game includes a remake of Pac-Man Vs.. It contains the following games:

Due to the violent nature of Splatterhouse, this is the first Namco Museum game to be rated T for Teen by the Entertainment Software Rating Board.[8] A retail release bundled with Pac-Man Championship Edition 2 Plus, titled Namco Museum Arcade Pac, was released on September 28, 2018.[9]

Namco Museum Mini Player[edit]

Namco Museum Mini Player is a dedicatedhandheld console shaped like a miniature arcade cabinet developed by My Arcade that includes 20 Namco games and was released by Bandai Namco Entertainment on June 24, 2019.[10] While it includes some games that originated on home consoles, the games included that did originate in arcades are based on their original arcade versions. The games included are:

Namco Museum Collection[edit]

Namco Museum Collection is a series of video game compilations for the Evercade handheld console which was released on May 22, 2020.[11]

Unlike other compilations, the games in these compilations are based on their home console versions (NES/Famicom, SNES/Super Famicom, and SEGA Genesis/Mega Drive) rather than arcade versions.

Collection 1[edit]

Collection 2[edit]

Namco Museum Archives[edit]

Main article: Namcot Collection

Namco Museum Archives Vol. 1 and Namco Museum Archives Vol. 2 were both released on June 18, 2020 for the Xbox One, PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, and Steam outside of Japan. Developed by M2 and B.B. Studio. The two volumes are localized versions of the Japanese compilation Namcot Collection, featuring Namco-published games for the Nintendo Entertainment System and Family Computer. Vol. 1 contains an 8-bit demake of Pac-Man Championship Edition, and Vol. 2 contains a homebrew conversion of Gaplus.

Vol. 1[edit]

Vol. 2[edit]

Reception[edit]

In August 1996, Namco claimed accumulated sales of 600,000 units for the Namco Museum series in Japan alone.[35] In the United States, The NPD Group in 2010 listed Namco Museum among the all-time top ten best-selling video games in the United States.[36] The franchise has sold a total of at least 14.087 million copies worldwide.[n 1]

The four reviewers of Electronic Gaming Monthly gave Volume 1 an 8.125 out of 10, citing the excellent quality of the emulation and the interesting virtual museum content. Mark Lefebvre summarized that "Namco has given gamers what they've always been asking for: old titles."[45]Next Generation likewise complimented the emulation quality and the virtual museum, and concluded that for those interested in retro compilations, "this is as good as this sort of thing gets." They scored it four out of five stars.[46]Maximum gave it three out of five stars, reasoning that "On the one hand, this is a collection of six indisputably classic games, three of which rank among the most influential titles in the history of videogames. On the other hand, all the games on the disk are over ten years old, and influential or not, they're definitely well past their sell by date. Pole Position may have revolutionised the racing genre in 1982, but would you really choose to play it over Ridge Racer Revolution in 1996?"[47] While GamePro found that all of the games save ToyPop remained great fun, the reviewer criticized the absence of the voice samples from Pole Position and compared the 3D museum unfavorably to the bonus content in Williams Arcade's Greatest Hits. He concluded the compilation to be worth renting at the least, and a must-have for retro gaming fans.[48]

Reviews for Volume 2 were also mixed to positive, though most critics found the selection of games weaker than that of Volume 1. The four reviewers of Electronic Gaming Monthly gave Volume 2 a 7.125 out of 10, with all four remarking that the compilation had two or three genuine classics, with the remaining three or four games being mediocre and overly obscure. However, they disagreed on which games fell into which group; for example, Dan Hsu said that "Super Pac-Man stinks", while Crispin Boyer called it "the best reason to buy NM2" and "the height of the yellow pellet-eater's evolution."[49]Jeff Gerstmann of GameSpot similarly commented, "While Mappy, Xevious, Gaplus, and Super Pac-Man are infinitely playable, the lesser-known Grobda and Dragon Buster are mediocre at best." He gave the compilation a 7.1 out of 10, praising the charm of the antiquated graphics and sound effects and the still potent gameplay.[50]Next Generation picked Grobda, Dragon Buster, and Mappy as the mediocre games in the compilation, reasoning that "all are examples of game genres that have evolved way beyond these originals, and with good reason." They scored it two out of five stars.[51] In direct contradiction to GameSpot and Next Generation, GamePro said that of the six games, "Super Pac-Man's weak control makes it the biggest disappointment, while Dragon Buster's action/adventure swordplay and Grobda's rapid-fire tank shooting hold up the best." They recommended the compilation for "those who enjoy simple, classic gameplay".[52]

Volume 3 continued the trend of increasingly mixed reviews for the series. Jeff Gerstmann and Next Generation both commented that Dig Dug, Ms. Pac-Man, and Galaxian are genuine classics, Pole Position II is good but suffers from the absence of the voice clips from the arcade version, The Tower of Druaga has aged poorly, and Phozon was a terrible game to begin with. However, while Gerstmann concluded the collection to be "a real letdown" after the first two volumes and advised gamers to skip it, giving it a 5.6 out of 10,[53]Next Generation concluded that "the number of true classics on Volume 3 outweigh the ones that never should have been unearthed", and gave it three out of five stars.[54]GamePro approved of both the entire set of games and the quality of the emulation, and deemed Volume 3 "must-have arcade fun".[55] Though Electronic Gaming Monthly never reviewed Volume 3, they named it a runner-up for "Best Compilation" (behind Street Fighter Collection) at their 1997 Editors' Choice Awards.[56]

Volume 4 saw a particularly steep decline in the series' critical standing, with most critics agreeing that of the five games included, only Ordyne and Assault were at all worthwhile.[57][58] Gerstmann gave it a 4.5 out of 10, and said the collection "is just plain depressing. It contains five games, and most of them are little known games that were little known for a reason."[57]Electronic Gaming Monthly's review team gave it a 5.75 out of 10. The team was evenly split: Shawn Smith and Crispin Boyer, each voting a 6.5 out of 10, found the interesting museum content and the two or three enjoyable games make the collection worthwhile, while Dan Hsu and Sushi-X both gave it a 5.0 and said it was a disappointment compared to the earlier volumes.[58] Both Gerstmann and GamePro commented that the first three volumes of Namco Museum had exhausted the series concept and Namco's backlog of genuine classics, and that Namco should have let the series end with volume 3.[57][59]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^Japanese: ナムコミュージアム, Hepburn: Namuko Myūjiamu
  2. ^Released under the Namco brand name outside North America.
  3. ^Released under the Namco brand name outside North America.

References[edit]

  1. ^Namco Museum series:
    • Namco Museum Vol. 1 sales: 1.65 million units[37]
    • Namco Museum Vol. 3 sales: 2.24 million units[37]
    • Namco Museum series Japan sales: 1 million (1998)[38]
    • Namco Museum Encore sales: 51,303 units[39]
    • Namco Museum 64 sales: 1.04 million units[37]
    • Namco Museum (GBA) sales: 2.96 million units[37]
    • Namco Museum (PS2) sales: ≈1.80 million units[37]
    • Namco Museum 50th Anniversary sales: 241,000 units[40]
    • Namco Museum Battle Collection Japan sales: 79,527 units[41]
    • Namco Museum Vol. 2 (PSP) sales: 24,934 units[42]
    • Namco Museum DS Japan sales: 33,393 units[43]
    • Namco Museum Remix Japan sales (first week): 1,700 units[39]
    • Namco Museum Virtual Arcade Japan sales (first week): 5,912 units[44]
  1. ^"Namco Product Catalog". Namco Ltd. 1984. Retrieved 20 July 2019.
  2. ^"PlayStation: Namco Steals the Show with Five New Arcade Conversions!". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 90. Ziff Davis. January 1997. p. 108.
  3. ^"Letters". Next Generation. No. 30. Imagine Media. June 1997. p. 133.
  4. ^"Behind the Screens: The Namco Games Chronicle". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 102. Ziff Davis. January 1998. p. 94.
  5. ^"Namco's US Launch Title". IGN. April 19, 2001. Retrieved December 6, 2017.
  6. ^Keiser, Joe (August 2, 2006). "The Century's Top 50 Handheld Games". Next Generation. Archived from the original on October 10, 2007.
  7. ^"IGN: Namco Museum Essentials Preview". IGN.
  8. ^"NAMCO MUSEUM". www.nintendo.com. Retrieved 2017-07-13.
  9. ^"Namco Museum Arcade Pac is a 2-in-1 Bundle Coming Exclusively to Switch". 2 July 2018.
  10. ^Bradley, Alan (28 May 2019). "The Namco Museum Mini Player is a tiny arcade for your desk". gamesradar. Retrieved 18 September 2021.
  11. ^http://evercade.co.uk/
  12. ^"Namco Museum Vol. 1 Reviews". GameRankings. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  13. ^"Namco Museum Vol. 2 Reviews". GameRankings. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  14. ^"Namco Museum Vol. 3 Reviews". GameRankings. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  15. ^"Namco Museum Vol. 4 Reviews". GameRankings. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  16. ^"Namco Museum Vol. 5 Reviews". GameRankings. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  17. ^"Namco Museum 64 Reviews". GameRankings. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  18. ^"Namco Museum Reviews". GameRankings. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  19. ^"Namco Museum". Metacritic. Retrieved June 29, 2013.
  20. ^"Namco Museum". Metacritic. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  21. ^"Namco Museum". Metacritic. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  22. ^"Namco Museum". Metacritic. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  23. ^"Namco Museum Battle Collection". Metacritic. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  24. ^"Namco Museum: 50th Anniversary". Metacritic. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  25. ^"Namco Museum: 50th Anniversary". Metacritic. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  26. ^"Namco Museum: 50th Anniversary". Metacritic. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  27. ^"Namco Museum: 50th Anniversary". Metacritic. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  28. ^"Namco Museum: 50th Anniversary". Metacritic. Retrieved June 29, 2013.
  29. ^"Namco Museum DS". Metacritic. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  30. ^"Namco Museum Remix". Metacritic. Retrieved June 28, 2013.
  31. ^"Namco Museum Virtual Arcade". Metacritic. Retrieved June 29, 2013.
  32. ^"Namco Museum Essentials". Metacritic. Retrieved June 29, 2013.
  33. ^"Namco Museum Megamix". Metacritic. Retrieved June 29, 2013.
  34. ^"Namco Museum (Switch)". GameRankings. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  35. ^"Tokyo Game Show '96: Japan Shows Off". Next Generation. No. 24. Imagine Media. December 1996. p. 16.
  36. ^Thorsen, Tor (January 21, 2010). "NPD: Wii Play top US best-seller to date". GameSpot. Retrieved 2021-11-01.
  37. ^ abcde"US Platinum Videogame Chart". The Magic Box. Retrieved 25 May 2019.
  38. ^"ナムコ、ファンの要望に応え、「ナムコミュージアム」 シリーズ最新作1980~1990年の名作ビデオゲームを完全移植した PS用ゲームソフト「ナムコミュージアムアンコール」を10月30日発売" (in Japanese). Bandai Namco Entertainment. October 28, 1997. Archived from the original on April 21, 2021. Retrieved April 21, 2021.
  39. ^ ab"Game Search (based on Famitsu data)". Game Data Library. March 1, 2020. Archived from the original on April 24, 2019. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  40. ^"株式会社バンダイナムコホールディングス 2006 年 3 月期 中間決算説明要旨" (in Japanese). Bandai Namco Holdings. November 24, 2005. Archived from the original on May 15, 2019. Retrieved April 21, 2021.
  41. ^"Namco Museum". Garaph. Retrieved 24 February 2005.
  42. ^"Namco Museum Vol.2". Garaph. Retrieved 23 February 2006.
  43. ^"Namco Museum DS". Garaph. Retrieved 11 October 2007.
  44. ^"Namco Museum: Virtual Arcade". Garaph. Retrieved 5 November 2009.
  45. ^"Review Crew: Namco Arcade Classics". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 82. Sendai Publishing. May 1996. p. 34.
  46. ^"Namco Museum Vol. 1". Next Generation. No. 21. Imagine Media. September 1996. p. 148.
  47. ^"Maximum Reviews: Namco Museum Volume 1". Maximum: The Video Game Magazine. No. 5. Emap International Limited. April 1996. p. 157.
  48. ^Tommy Glide (September 1996). "Proreview: Namco's Museum Volume 1". GamePro. No. 96. IDG. p. 64.
  49. ^"Review Crew: Namco Museum Vol. 2". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 88. Ziff Davis. November 1996. p. 84.
  50. ^Gerstmann, Jeff (December 13, 1996). "Namco Museum Volume 2 Review". GameSpot. Retrieved 22 November 2017.
  51. ^"Namco's Museum Volume 2". Next Generation. No. 24. Imagine Media. December 1996. p. 256.
  52. ^Doctor Devon (December 1996). "ProReview: Namco Museum Vol. 2". GamePro. No. 99. IDG. p. 130.
  53. ^Gerstmann, Jeff (March 11, 1997). "Namco Museum Volume 3 Review". GameSpot. Retrieved 12 June 2018.
  54. ^"Namco Museum Volume 3". Next Generation. No. 27. Imagine Media. March 1997. p. 86.
  55. ^Dr. Zombie (March 1997). "PlayStation ProReview: Namco Museum Volume 3". GamePro. No. 102. IDG. p. 78.
  56. ^"Editors' Choice Awards". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 104. Ziff Davis. March 1998. p. 96.
  57. ^ abcGerstmann, Jeff (August 5, 1997). "Namco Museum Volume 4 Review". GameSpot. Retrieved 1 November 2018.
  58. ^ ab"Review Crew: Namco Museum Volume 4". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 96. Ziff Davis. July 1997. p. 54.
  59. ^Art Angel (August 1997). "PlayStation ProReview: Namco Museum Volume 4". GamePro. No. 107. IDG. p. 72.
Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Video game preservation

Form of preservation in video gaming

Video game preservation seeks to collect games from a wide variety of game systems no longer in production.

Video game preservation is a form of preservation applied to the video game industry that includes, but is not limited to digital preservation. Such preservation efforts include archiving development source code and art assets, digital copies of video games, emulation of video game hardware, maintenance and preservation of specialized video game hardware such as arcade games and video game consoles, and digitization of print video game magazines and books prior to the Digital Revolution.

Importance of preservation[edit]

Besides retaining the ability to play games from the past, preservation of video games enables research on the history of video games as well as ways for developers to look at older games to build ideas from.[1] There is also interest in the preservation of cancelled video games that were known to be in development, as coupled with the reasons for cancellation, they can provide a understanding of the technical and creative aspects, or lack thereof, at the time of the game's development.[2]

Unlike some examples of other forms of media like books, art and photography, and film, which antedate the mid-20th century and which can be preserved in a variety of formats that are not prohibited by more-recent intellectual property (IP) laws, video games typically require specialized and/or proprietary computer hardware and software to read and execute game software. However, as technology advances, these older game systems become obsolete, no longer produced nor maintained to use for executing games.[3] The media formats of the early days of computer gaming, relying on floppy discs and CD-ROMs, suffer from disc rot and degrade over time, making it difficult to recover information.[4] Further, video games tend to rely on other resources like operating systems, network connectivity, and external servers outside control of users, and making sure these boundary aspects to a video game are preserved along with the game are also essential.[3]

One period of the video game industry that has received a great deal of attention is up through the 1980s. As a result of the video game crash of 1983, many companies involved in developing games folded or were acquired by other companies. In this process, the source code for many games prior to the crash were lost or destroyed, leaving only previously-sold copies of games on their original format as evidence of their existence.[5] Even of companies that survived the crash, long-term planning towards preservation was not always a consideration. Both Nintendo and Sega are considered part of the few companies from this period known to have actively worked to backup and retain their games, even those that were cancelled or unreleased, over time.[2]

Preservation also has become an issue with the prevalence of digital distribution on console platforms; as manufacturers drop support for older hardware, games that exist only in digital form may be lost. This issue came to light when Sony Interactive Entertainment announced plans to shut down storefronts for the PlayStation 3, PlayStation Portable and PlayStation Vita by mid-2021, though which Sony later reversed, leaving the PlayStation 3 and Vita stores open indefinitely, while limiting PlayStation Portable purchases to the Vita and PlayStation 3 storefronts.[6] An estimated 2,200 games across these platforms were only available digitally, and while most have versions on other platforms, about 120 were exclusive to the Sony platform and would become completely unavailable after the stores' closure. Prior to reversing their decision, Sony did not provide any immediate plans to offer these titles by other means.[7]

Preservation has become a greater priority for game companies since the 2000s with the ease of redundant digital storage solutions, and thus tends not to be an issue for games issued since that point. Frank Cifaldi, director of the Video Game History Foundation, said that Electronic Arts had developed an extensive means of preserving their games at the end of the development cycle, and had contacted former employees to collect data and assets from past games to help preserve their titles.[8]

Legal issues[edit]

See also: Intellectual property protection of video games

Most issues related to video game preservation are based on the United States, one of the largest markets for video games, and as such, issues related to preservation are limited by laws of the country.

In general, the copying and distribution of video games that are under copyright without authorization is considered a copyright violation (often called as software piracy). However, it has generally been tolerated that users may make archival copies of software (including video games) as long as they own the original software; if the user sells or loses the original software in any way, they must destroy the archival copies. This is also justification for a person being able to make ROM images from game cartridges that they own.

In 1998, the United States Congress passed the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), designed to bring copyright within the United States to align with two doctrines published by the World Intellectual Property Organization in 1996. The DMCA make it a criminal offense to develop, sell, or use technologies that are designed to bypass anti-circumvention devices, including software digital rights management (DRM) used in various forms of media. This subsequently made it illegal to backup up one's software for many games distributed via either game cartridge or optical disc, if some form of DRM was used to limit access to the software on the media.

The Library of Congress is responsible to open submissions for specific and narrow exemptions from interested parties every three years, and determine which of those, if any, to grant. Through the Library of Congress, some key exceptions to the DMCA have been granted to allow for video game preservation.

  • In the 2003 set of exemptions, the Library disallowed enforcement of the DMCA for "computer programs protected by dongles that prevent access due to malfunction or damage and which are obsolete" and for "computer programs and video games distributed in formats that have become obsolete and which require the original media or hardware as a condition of access".[9]
  • In the 2015 exemptions, the Library granted permission for preservationists to work around copy-protection in games which required an authentication step with an external server that was no longer online prior to playing the game which otherwise did not require online connectivity; this specifically did not cover games that were based on a server-client mode like most massively-multiplayer online games (MMOs). The exemption included the use of emulators and other computer programs that would be required to play the game on available systems.[10]
  • In the 2018 exemptions, the Library allowed for preservation and fair use of server-based games like MMOs, permitting preservationists to offer such games where they have legally obtained the game's code within museums and libraries.[11]

The DMCA exemptions do not mean all ROM images are legal, and concern about continuing video game preservation was raised in mid-2018, after Nintendo initiated a lawsuit against two websites that distributed ROMs for games from their older platforms.[12]

Normal copyright laws and contractual agreements may also hamper legitimate preservation efforts. The 2000 game The Operative: No One Lives Forever and its sequel are considered to be in copyright limbo due to subsequent business moves that dispersed where the IP may have gone: the games were developed by Monolith Productions which after publication became a subsidiary of Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment. The games' publisher was Sierra Entertainment, which had been owned by Fox Interactive, a subsidiary of 20th Century Fox, but later sold to Vivendi Games; Vivendi Games itself eventually was merged into Activision Blizzard. Around 2014, Nightdive Studios, a company with interest in reviving old games, had spent significant time working between Warner Bros., Fox, and Activision to try to track down the ownership of the game's IP but none of the three companies had immediate knowledge of the IP's state, and did not see the value in searching their paper archives to find the required documents, particularly in the case of jointly-owned IP.[13]

Further hampering preservation issues is the fact that most video game development are made as work for hire products, with the ownership kept by the company that hires the video game developers rather than with the developer themselves. Many developers have kept some or all of the game's code they have worked on, but typically cannot release this due to their employment contracts and because their employer owns that copyright. However, some developers, after enough time has passed, have released their code to preservation efforts despite not owning the copyright directly, on the basis that the value of preservation would outweigh the impact on copyright.[2]

Preservation of video game software[edit]

Emulation[edit]

Video game console emulators use software that replicates the hardware environment of a video-game console, arcade machine, or specific PC architecture. Generally these create a virtual machine on newer computer systems that simulate the key processing units of the original hardware. The emulators then can read in software, such as a ROM image for arcade games or cartridge-based systems, or the game's optical media disc or an ISO image of that disc, to play the game in full.[14]

Emulation has been used in some official capacity on newer consoles. Nintendo's Virtual Console allows games from its earlier consoles and other third-parties to be played on its newer ones. Sony had originally released the PlayStation 3 with backwards compatibility with PlayStation 1 and PlayStation 2 games if players had the original media, but have transitioned to selling emulated games in its PlayStation Store as well as offering the PlayStation Nowcloud gaming service that allows PlayStation 3 games to be played on other devices including the PlayStation 4 and compatible personal computers. Microsoft has created a backwards compatibility program through emulation to allow selected Xbox titles to be played on the Xbox 360, and similarly another program for certain Xbox and Xbox 360 titles to be played on the Xbox One and Xbox Series X and Series S if they own the original game, and have made some of these titles available for purchase via digital distribution through Xbox Live. Former console hardware companies such as Sega and Atari have released emulation-based collections of their games for multiple systems.

In the PC space, emulation of either a game engine or full operating system are available. In these cases, players are expected to own copies of the game to use the content files. DOSBox emulates a complete IBM PC compatible operating system allowing most games for older computers to be run on modern systems. Emulators also exist for older arcade games, such as MAME.

Head of Xbox Game StudiosPhil Spencer has also suggested that cloud gaming can help with emulation and preservation, as on the server backend for cloud gaming, more technical resources can be offered to support emulation in a manner that appears transparent to the end user.[15] Spencer said "My hope (and I think I have to present it that way as of now) is as an industry we'd work on legal emulation that allowed modern hardware to run any (within reason) older executable allowing someone to play any game."[16]

There are legalities related to emulation that can make it difficult to preserve video games in this manner. First, the legality of creating an emulator itself is unclear. Several United States case laws, notably Sony Computer Entertainment, Inc. v. Connectix Corp. (2000), have shown that developing emulation is a legal activity as long as no proprietary information or copyrighted code is incorporated into the emulation. This generally requires that the emulator be developed through reverse engineering in a clean room design, using only publicly-released information about the system. Once completed, emulators need access to a game's ROM image or even a console's BIOS image. While acquiring a copy of a ROM or BIOS by dumping from a console one owns for one's own use falls within fair use, obtaining and distributing ROM and BIOS images from other parties are recognized as copyright violations.[14]

Migration[edit]

Migration refers to re-releasing software from one platform to a newer platform, otherwise keeping all the gameplay, narrative, and art assets the same. This can be done through a few routes:[17]

  • Game engine recreation: A new universal game engine can be developed that uses the original game assets but otherwise runs on any future hardware platform. Such examples include the Z-machine for many of the Infocom text adventure games, and the ScummVM allows players to run nearly every LucasArts adventure game.
  • Software re-compilation or porting: The original source code for the game is re-compiled for a newer platform, making necessary changes to work on the newer hardware. This requires that the source code for the original game is available for this purpose. Many of the games published by Digital Eclipse are based on decompiling of the original game's code with approval of the copyright owner into their own Eclipse engine which allows for porting to any number of systems.[18][19]

Abandonware[edit]

Abandonware refers to software that may still be capable of running on modern computers or consoles, but the developer or publisher has either disappeared, no longer sell the product, or no longer operate servers necessary for running the software, among other cases. Examples include Freelancer (as its publisher went out of business) and Black & White (due to the closure of the development studio). The aforementioned No One Lives Forever is considered such a case due to the lack of interest of the known likely-rights holders to affirm their ownership and work out licensing arrangements for rerelease.[20]

Because of the lack of availability of any legal retail route to purchase the case, these games may be offered at no cost by some websites, such as Home of the Underdogs, typically with necessary patches to remove copyright protection and updates to play on newer systems.[21] Legally, such software still falls under normal copyright laws, making this practice illegal. Copyright only disappears over time depending on its copyright term (from 75 to 90 years for most video games), and even with shuttered companies, the copyright is an asset that often becomes owned by the liquidator of the closed company. Normally it would be up to the copyright owner to seek legal action, and with shuttered developers and publishers, this often did not happen, but since around 1999, video game trade organizations like the Entertainment Software Association have stepped in to take direct action against sites as representatives for all of its members.[21]

Under the DMCA, the Copyright Office has made exceptions since 2015 for allowing museums and other archivists to bypass copyright issues to get such software into a playable state, a new exception seeks to allow this specifically for multiplayer games requiring servers, specifically massively-multiplayer online games.[22]

Fan-driven efforts[edit]

In some cases, fans of a video game have helped to preserve the game to the best of their abilities without access to source code, even though the copyright nature of these fan projects are highly contentious, and more so when monetary issues are involved. Games like Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic II and Vampire: The Masquerade – Bloodlines, which had difficult production issues before release, may leave unused assets to be found by players, and in the case of both these games, players have developed unofficial patches that work to complete the content, in some cases, exceeding expectations of the original content creators.[23] Remakes of games to modern platforms or game engines may also be led through fan efforts. Black Mesa is a fan-based remake of the first Half-Life game from Valve Corporation, but enhancing the game's assets from the original GoldSrc game engine to the newer Source engine, with Valve's blessing for the effort.[24]

Databases[edit]

Video game databases have been created to track historical video games, particularly those from the early days of the industry which have become forgotten.[25] Sites like MobyGames and the Internet Games Database (IGDB).[26][27]Home of the Underdogs remains a database of early computer games after the site eliminated its abandonware offerings.[21] User-driven databases (often referred to as "dats") created by video game "datting" groups that store hashes and other important metadata provide a quality assurance aspect by comparing different contributors' dump results. Redump.org stores the hash and metadata information for over 70,000 video game disc dumps. No-Intro.org stores the metadata and hashes for cartridge and DLC based games and content. These systems act as a card catalog to track game releases across various regions, comparing software revisions and other data such as serial numbers and barcodes. Additional databases, both functional and defunct, include TOSEC and trurip.

Others[edit]

Source code for older games, before rights were strongly controlled by publishers, were often kept by the programmers themselves, and they may release those, or may be part of their estate after death. In one case, a lost Nintendo Entertainment System game, an earlier version of Days of Thunder by Chris Oberth, who had died in 2012, was recovered from source code on floppy discs from his work materials in 2020 by the Video Game History Foundation with permission of his family.[28]

Preservation of video game software has come through dubious routes. Notably, the source code for all of the Infocom text adventure games had been obtained by Jason Scott in 2008 via an anonymous user in the "Infocom drive", an archive file that represented the entirety of the Infocom's main server days prior to the company's relocation from Massachusetts to California in 1989. While Scott was aware this was akin to industrial espionage, he still had published the source code for the games for purposes of preservation.[29] John Hardie of the National Videogame Museum had gone dumpster diving through the trash of shutdown companies to recover materials for his collection.[30]

Preservation of video game hardware[edit]

The only known existing hardware unit of the Super NES CD-ROM- a Sony-produced Super Nintendo Entertainment System with a CD-ROM system and the predecessor of the PlayStation

While in most cases, digitizing the software for video games is sufficient for preservation, there have been enough unique consoles with limited production runs that can create further challenges for video game preservation as it is difficult to emulate its software. When hardware is in ready supply, white-hat hackers and programmers can freely tear-down these systems to analyze their internals for reverse engineering for preservation, but when systems are in limited supply, such tactics are not appropriate. These systems can also degrade as well. More often, broken or non-functional versions of older hardware can be acquired to demonstrate that such systems existed, but fail to work as a software preservation tool. For example, only one copy of the Super NES CD-ROM, a Sony-produced Super Nintendo Entertainment System with a CD-ROM drive, has been found out of an estimated 200 that were produced before Sony and Nintendo's deal changed. The unit was carefully repaired to be able to use the CD-ROM so that some functionality of its software could be verified and allow the few known software titles to be tested on it.[31]

Print media preservation[edit]

Box art and game manuals accompanied most games published before 2000, and there had been an extensive number of magazines published on video games which have since declined. There is a strong interest in the digital preservation of these materials alongside software and hardware as reference material to help document the early history of video games, which did not receive the type of detailed coverage that the field sees as of the 2010s. In most cases, these works are preserved through digital scanning and storage from libraries and user collections.[32] The Video Game History Foundation maintains a physical and digital collection of these magazines in their collection, while RetroMags has similarly worked to provide digital archives of retro gaming magazines under a fair use approach given that most of these magazines and their publishers are now defunct.[33]

Preservation efforts[edit]

Library of Congress[edit]

The United States Library of Congress (LoC) launched the National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program (NDIIPP) in 2000 to preserve non-traditional media. Around 2007, the LoC started reaching out to partners in various industries to help explore how they archive such content. The LoC had funded the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign (UIUC) from 2004 to 2010 to develop the ECHO DEPository ("Exploring Collaborations to Harvest Objects in a Digital Environment for Preservation") program.[34]

Preserving Virtual Worlds[edit]

Preserving Virtual Worlds was one project funded by the LoC and conducted by the Rochester Institute of Technology, Stanford University, the University of Maryland, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, along with support from Linden Lab, running from 2008 to 2010. The study explored a range of games, from Spacewar! (1962) through Second Life (2003, which was developed by Linden Labs), to determine what methods could be used for preserving these titles. The project concluded that while there are technical solutions for preservation of game software, such as identifying common formats for digital storage and developing database architectures to track ownership, many issues related to preservation remain legal in nature relating to copyright laws.[3][35]

National Film and Sound Archive[edit]

The National Film and Sound Archive of Australia announced in September 2019 that they will start to create an archive of Australian-developed video games for preservation and exhibition, with games to be added on an annual basis. The preservation effort will include not only the software but art, music and other creative assets as well as making considerations for playability in the long-term.[36]

Internet Archive[edit]

The Internet Archive started adding emulation of video games from older systems for play.[37] The Archive developed Emularity, a web-browser based emulator to run a number of out-of-production arcade, console and computer emulations, and offer numerous titles to be played through the Archive. The project's maintainer, Jason Scott, said that most companies do not take issue with their ROM images being offered in this manner, but did note that Nintendo has put pressure on them to not include any Nintendo consoles within the collection.[38][39] They also began to archive Adobe Flash animations and games in November 2020, ahead of the December 31, 2020, end-of-life for Adobe Flash, using a new emulator called Ruffle.[40]

Video Game History Foundation[edit]

Main article: Video Game History Foundation

Frank Cifaldi is one of the leading historians in the video game industry trying to encourage more video game preservation and to help recover games once thought lost. By 2017, he had spent about twenty years trying to encourage preservation as to track video game history, and established the non-profit Video Game History Foundation in 2017. The Foundation not only seeks to preserve games, but box art, manuals, and promotional material from video games, believing that these combined can help future historians understand the culture of games in the past.[41][42]

National Videogame Museum[edit]

Main article: National Videogame Museum

The National Videogame Museum in the United States bore out of archival work performed by John Hardie who had run the Classic Gaming Expo. During this time Hardie had collected a number of video game materials from others and his own efforts. The collection of material collected drew interest from industry events including E3[43][44] and the Game Developers Conference,[45] helping to promote the collection. Hardie exhibited the materials through traveling shows, and got interest from Randy Pitchford to establish a permanent home for the collection. The Museum was opened in Frisco, Texas, in 2016. While some companies have donated materials to the Museum, Hardie stated it has been difficult in convincing other developers and publishers to contribute to the preservation efforts.[30]

The Centre for Computing History[edit]

Main article: Centre for Computing History

The Centre for Computing History's ongoing efforts have resulted in the physical preservation of over 13,000 video games since 2008.[46] Information for every item in the collection is accessible via their online catalogue. The Centre also digitally archives source code for games such as the Magic Knight series by David Jones,[47] and preserves and hosts scans of original sketches and other development materials from game companies such as Guerrilla Games. Their work emphasises the importance of preserving all aspects of the experience of a game, from marketing materials to the copy protection experience, packaging, and hardware.[48] The Centre's collection also hosts uncommon hardware and operating systems with this in mind. The Centre is also working with current video game developers and publishers, acting as a repository for their ongoing work so that it is actively preserved.[49]

The Strong Institute[edit]

Main article: International Center for the History of Electronic Games

Among other educational aspects The Strong institute in Rochester, New York, operates the International Center for the History of Electronic Games.[4]

Videogame Heritage Society[edit]

The Videogame Heritage Society is an effort started by the United Kingdom's National Videogame Museum along with the British Library, the Museum of London, the Centre for Computing History, the National Science and Media Museum in Bradford, Bath Spa University, and several independent collectors in 2020 to preserve video games developed in the United Kingdom.[50]

Game Preservation Society[edit]

Founded in 2011 in Tokyo, the Game Preservation Society preserves the history of Japanese video games. The organization's focus is the preservation of 1980s Japanese computer games for platforms like the PC-88 and Sharp X1. The society's president, French national Joseph Redon, estimates that they will only be able to preserve about 80% of Japanese computer games.[51]

National Software Reference Library[edit]

While strictly not set up for preservation, the National Software Reference Library, created and maintained by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has included a number of popular game software among other software principally used for help in digital forensics, storing electronic copies of these games and other programs. The initial games collection was added in 2016 with numerous titles collected by Stephen Cabrinety, who had died in 1995;[52] in 2018, Valve, Activision-Blizzard, and Electronic Arts all donated additional titles to be added to the collection, while NIST itself purchased other popular titles to include.[53]

Hong Kong Game Association (RETRO.HK)[edit]

Founded in 2015 in Hong Kong by Dixon Wu and other volunteers with decades of video game knowledge, the Hong Kong Game Association is a non-profit society dedicated to preserve, curate, and showcase video game history, especially focusing on locally developed PC & console games, and traditional Chinese video game literature. The Association organizes the annual RETRO.HK Gaming Expo and RetroCup - free annual retro game events that are dedicated to promoting video game and competitive gaming as a culture and art form to the public.[54] The association has worked with multiple local universities or colleges to promote the cause, such as The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, The City University of Hong Kong, The Open University of Hong Kong, and the Hong Kong Institute of Vocational Education (IVE) group.

The Museum of Art and Digital Entertainment[edit]

Founded in 2011 in Oakland, California, the Museum of Art and Digital Entertainment, the MADE performed the first institutional preservation of an online game when it worked with F. Randall Farmer, Chip Morningstar, Fujitsu, and a group of volunteers to relaunch LucasFilm Games' Habitat.[55] This work lead to collaboration with UC Berkeley to petition for a 1201 DMCA exemption for the preservation of MMO games.[56] The source code to Habitat has since been release as open source software under the MIT license.[57] The MADE continues to work on further digital preservation, focusing on source code and online games.

Flashpoint[edit]

The Adobe Flash standard, heavily used in browser-based video games in the 2000s, was fully removed from most web browsers at the end of 2020 due to long-running security issues with the Flash format, and made these games unplayable. An effort called Flashpoint was established in 2018 to collect as many of the freely-available Flash games as possible for archival purposes, excluding those games that were offered commercially or that require a server to play, and allowing authors to request removal. As of January 2020, the Flashpoint project has more than 38,000 Flash games in its archive.[58][59]

Project Deluge[edit]

Project Deluge, run by a group of video game fans called Hidden Palace, is a collection of various video game prototypes from the PlayStation, PlayStation 2, Sega Saturn, Sega Dreamcast, CD-i, and original Xbox console games available in various forms for users to view or play, typically through use of an emulator. These prototypes reportedly are based on a collection of such games maintained by one user who had worked to assure all the prototypes they collected from developers and publishers were digitally preserved so that Hidden Palace was then able to share them with the larger community. Such prototypes can help video game historians track how games had changed over their development period, as well as prototypes of cancelled games.[60][61]

Rereleases[edit]

Companies like GOG.com and Night Dive Studios are recognized for helping to migrate older games to modern systems. Among their efforts include doing the research to track down all legal rights that are associated with a game, including those that have changed hands several times, as to get clearance or rights to republish the title, locate as much of the game's original source code and adapt that to work on modern systems, or when source code is not available, reverse engineer the game to either work natively or through emulation (like DOSBox) with modern hardware. GOG.com and Night Dive have successfully freed some games from IP limbo, such as System Shock 2, while identifying titles that remain difficult to republish and preserve legally due to conflicts on IP rights holders, such as No One Lives Forever.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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