Amazon.com: Tropico 2: Pirate Cove - PC : Video Games

Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2

Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2

Part II: On the thermoeconomic cost, Part III: Energy savings and thermoeconomics. In: Gaggioli, R., editor. Computer-Aided Engineering of Energy. Preface. This build is intended for those who have an interest in gaming, editing recorded footage, and streaming on a site like Twitch. A PC with these. Warsaw, Poland, September 20-22, 2010, Proceedings, Part II Leonard Bolc, These text editor windows behave like billboards that are alway parallel. Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2

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Diminta ngerakit PC dengan budget 8 Juta, ini pilihan saya.

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AMD vs Intel

Building a Photo and Video Editing PC, Part 1: CPU and Motherboard

The CPU and motherboard are the beating heart of your PC build, and picking the right combo is key to building an awesome photo and video editing PC
Source: Pixabay, CC0

Building your own PC is the best way to get maximum photo- and video-editing performance for minimal spend, but the idea of putting together such a complex piece of tech scares most would-be builders away from even trying.

Fortunately, it's not as scary as it seems, and to prove it, we're going to teach you how to build your own creator PC while simultaneously building one ourselves! We've partnered with Intel, NVIDIA, MSI, Corsair and Seagate to get all of the parts we need to build a top-tier photo- and video-editing PC for the DPReview offices. And while we're building ours, we'll walk you though everything you need to know to plan out and build your own.

The series will be split into six parts:

  • Part 1: CPU and motherboard
  • Part 2: GPU, RAM and storage
  • Part 3: PSU, case and cooler
  • Part 4: Monitor and calibration
  • Part 5: A step-by-step build guide
  • Part 6: Benchmarking our build

Jump to:

1. Choosing a CPU

Key Specs

Guide to Building A PC For Video Editing

Building A PC For Video Editing

Guest Post by Denis Ogorodov

Building a PC for video editing can mean faster rendering, smoother video playback, and a more reliable workflow, but it can easily turn into an expensive over or underpowered headache if you don’t do your research. This guide is intended to help freelance editors who are interested in building their own PC workstation but might not know exactly where to begin. This guide will shed light on what each PC component does, and what hardware you should prioritize for editing.

Read about the system Denis ultimately built

Question 1: What’s Your Budget?

Start by asking yourself, “what’s my budget?” Think of your new PC as a business investment. In other words don’t ask, “how much should I spend?” instead ask “will I get a good return on this investment?” Having set up this mindset, you will have a much better idea of what you are willing to spend. A good thousand dollar monitor might sound like a luxury if you’re editing part-time, but if you are spending 12+ hours a day staring at monitors, and this monitor helps alleviate eye-strain or back pain, then $1,000 dollars for 3+ years of work doesn’t sound so unreasonable.

My advice for full time, professional editors is to consider spending around $2,500-$3,000 on a workstation. Newer editors who are working part-time, or are still in school, should aim around $1,500. You can build a very beefy PC for $1,500. If PC building is too overwhelming, or you’re on the move and don’t mind spending closer to $2,000 consider a MacBook Pro, they are some of the best laptops when it comes to video editing, no joke.

That said, if you want something that can rip through 4K R3D and Arri RAW, playback realtime while color grading footage, render and transcode footage within minutes instead of hours, things are going to get expensive, fast. Especially when it comes to dependable and fast storage solutions. Be prepared to spend $6,000-8,000 for your build, and this is not including proper reference monitors for color grading (like these) which start at around $3,000.

Flanders Scientific

Question 2: What Editing Programs Do You Use?

Next, ask yourself “What editing apps do I use?” If you are a video editor you’re probably using one of three programs: Avid, Premiere, or Final Cut Pro X. In addition, if you create visual effects or color correct then you might use: After Effects, Resolve, Nuke, Autodesk Smoke, Cinema 4D, or even Unity.

As you may know, these programs have very different hardware needs:

  • Da Vinci Resolve relies heavily on the GPU. I recommend at least a GTX 1060 - GB GPU for this app. If budget allows upgrade to a GTX 1070 or if you want to color 4K smoothly, a 1080ti would be best.
  • Compositing programs like After Effects and Nuke benefit from a lot of RAM. I recommend at least 32GB. If you’re heavily using these apps go with 64GB.
  • Transcoding programs like Compressor and Adobe Media Encoder rely heavily on your CPU. You’ll need at least an Intel 8700k or an AMD 1600x processor if you’re expecting to do a decent amount of transcoding.
  • Editing programs like Premiere, Media Composer, and FCPX, in addition to your CPU, and GPU, rely heavily on the speed of your HDDs. You’ll want at least a Samsung 850 Evo SSD for your O.S. and an external raid such as a G-Raid or, if budget allows, a Pegasus 3. If your budget is really tight you might consider a single internal HDD like one of these Barracudas. They are impressively speedy.

Barracudas Motherboard

Question 3: What kind of footage do you work with?

Understanding and predicting your needs when it comes to file formats, codecs and transcoding will help you understand how much CPU processing power, and hard drive storage you really need.

  • Do you mostly edit 30 second promos or two hour documentaries?
  • What camera formats do you mostly edit?
  • What about resolution? Are you expecting to edit in 1080p or 4k?
  • Are you also color correcting, or adding visual effects to your projects?
  • Do you plan on using a proxy workflow, and finishing your project somewhere else?

RAM memory chip

What’s inside a PC?

Let’s define some of the components of a PC that can be specified when building your own machine. Mac people, pay attention! You might not be used to this:

  • CPU (aka Central Processing Unit) - This is the computer's brain. It is responsible for running all the programs and applications on your machine, including your operating system (Windows).
  • CPU Cooler - CPUs get hot! To keep them running safely and efficiently it is important to use a heatsink and fans to keep the temperature low and stable.
  • Motherboard - If the CPU is the brain, then the motherboard is the body of the machine, it holds and connects all your comments and allows them to talk to each other.
  • RAM (aka memory) - Is your computer’s short-term memory (as opposed to your hard drive which is long term memory). It allows the computer to run multiple programs at the same time, and reduces the amount of times you have to access your slower hard drives or long-term memory.
  • Internal hard drives - These are your computer’s long-term memory. They store all of your files and data safely. When the computer is turned off this data is preserved and can be accessed again at a later date. RAM gets cleared out.
  • GPU (video card) - A video card is designed to render graphics and helps alleviate some of the computational stress off of the CPU, especially when it comes to rendering.
  • VRAM - Is the short-term memory of your GPU. The more VRAM your GPU has the more graphics you can run at the same time. Operating System - Windows, Linux, or Mac OS (hackintosh). This guide focuses on windows.
  • Peripherals - These are elements that plug into the outside of your computer like your monitor, speakers, keyboard and mouse.

Hardware Needs For Video Editors

When you look up build guides online they start with the CPU, but we’re going to start a layer deeper than that and look at the motherboard.

Motherboard Needs

When it comes to future proofing your PC, or allowing for upgradability the unsung hero is PCIe. PCIe are slots in your motherboard that allow you to customize your PC with additional hardware such as professional sound cards, additional graphics cards, MPEG render cards like the RED Rocket, 10/100Gbe Ethernet cards for NAS/Network solutions, thunderbolt expansion, SAS, NVMe SSDs, raid cards, capture cards and so much more!

What are PCIe lanes? Lanes are electric circuits that determine how much data and power can be transferred between the CPU and the components plugged into the motherboard through the motherboard’s slots (like a GPU for example). Most motherboards on the market (like this one) have fewer PCIe lanes then what I’d recommend for video editing, ranging from a total of 16-20. For video editing I recommend a motherboard and CPU combination that support a total of 40+ (like this one).

Gaming Motherboard

PCIe lanes are shared by slots on your motherboard. A slot is where hardware components are plugged into the motherboard. A motherboard usually has 4-5 slots of varying sizes, ranging from x1 to x16 lanes each (this is the length of the slot). Of course the higher the total amount of PCIe lanes supported by your motherboard and CPU, the more hardware can be installed on your machine.

For a video editor your peripherals, meaning external devices like monitors, keyboards, and editing surfaces, also might dictate what kind of motherboard you purchase for your work station. For example a colorist might want a Resolve control panel and an SDI output card, while an editor might want an audio mixer. These will each require a slightly different connector.

Black Magic Deck Link

Building a computer with a great CPU is useless to many editors if the motherboard can’t support Thunderbolt for example. With that said let’s look at what features an Editor should prioritize.

CPU Needs

Like it or not a lot of software including Adobe Premiere, doesn’t scale well with dual CPUs (not to be confused with a single CPU’s core count). With modern CPUs reaching high core counts (like the 7900x) while keeping respectable clock speeds, dual CPUs aren’t always advantageous for video editing tasks. This is true even for 4K workflows as this article explains.

Intel Xeon CPUs are often marketed to support two things: dual CPUs and ECC Memory. As we’ve mentioned Dual CPUs aren’t necessary, but what about ECC Memory? ECC Memory is short for Error Correcting Code Memory. In appearance and most functions this is the same RAM any computer uses, however ECC Memory is designed to detect and correct data corruption, really cool stuff. It sounds great on paper, but the type of errors we are dealing with only affect programs related to financial computing, or precise instruments for scientific research, not video editing. For this reason, ECC Memory is unnecessary for Video Editing, not to mention expensive. Using Xeon CPU’s severely limits your motherboard options, and consequently RAM choices. 

Intel Processors

RAM Needs

If you’re editing mostly 1080p footage promos with little to no compositing effects work you can easily work with 16GB of RAM. However, if you work on longer videos (feature length films for example), or create a lot of visual effects, I would recommend a minimum of 32GB. If you’re editing and compositing 4K footage then 32GB will be enough most of the time. If you're working exclusively with 4K or even larger frame sizes then I recommend at least 64GB of RAM.

Thunderbolt (Interface for external peripherals)

Thunderbolt is an interface that many video editors are familiar with, and very much value. Thunderbolt technology allows an editor to further increase the flexibility of your PC. Thunderbolt acts as an external PCIe extension, meaning you can plug-in heavy data reliant devices such as GPUs or a DAS system. Thunderbolt can be used for external GPU’s via a PCIe Box, fast raid systems, 5K+ monitors, and daisy chaining hard drives (a video editing friendly feature). Thunderbolt 3 is the latest iteration of the technology and supports up to 40Gbps of transfer speed, that’s a potential of 5,000 MB of data transferred per second! This bandwidth allows you to use some of the fastest external storage solutions available, and consequently smooth playback of high-resolution and high-bitrate files, such as 8K R3D RAW files.

Yet, Thunderbolt compatible motherboards are uncommon because of it’s slow adoption rate and costs. However, Thunderbolt (an Intel technology) is now royalty-free and PC hardware in 2018 and 2019 is showing signs of wide adoption. Frankly if you’re editing mostly 1080p videos then USB 3.1 will be a good enough connection. As soon as you start venturing towards an external raid system that holds terabytes of data, and 4K workflows, Thunderbolt 3 becomes a lot more attractive.

There are alternatives to Thunderbolt on both PC and Mac for connecting to a hard drive or shared storage. Many NAS devices connect via 10GBe or even 100Gbe ethernet cards. Thunderbolt is only compatible with specific Intel CPUs and no AMD CPUs (for now).

If Thunderbolt is a must, I recommend Gigabyte or Asus motherboards, specifically their x299 motherboards which both support PCIe Thunderbolt cards such as the GC-Alpine-Ridge and the Thunderbolt EX3.

Thunderbolt 3

(learn more on PC Mag).  

Hard Drives or Storage Systems Needs

Unlike other types of digital artists, editors are highly dependent on large storage volumes with redundancy, backups, and consistent transfer speeds, fast access times at a large bandwidth. Storage is something you really can’t cut corners on, and if you are, you’re shooting yourself in the foot. Video editors, transfer, copy and transcode terabytes of data, the last project I worked on had 18 Terabytes of data. Luckily now more than ever there are many storage solutions available. Storage is a giant topic, that deserves a whole post of its own but I will list below some common storage solutions.

  • Hard Disk Drives or HDDs, is your most common data storage device. They are slow, cheap and somewhat reliable. They are great for backup, transferring footage from set to post, and shipping.
  • Solid State Drives or SSDs are faster than regular HDDs but prohibitively expensive for large projects. They have significantly faster read and write speeds as such they can playback footage with a significantly higher bit rate.
  • A RAID system (Redundant Array of Independent Disks) is a data storage technology that allows you to combine multiple HDDs into one unit. This is done for both redundancy to minimize the risks of data loss but more importantly to improve read and write speeds.
  • Cloud Storage like Google Drive, and DropBox are useful for backing up project files or presets, but not for storing large files like your footage. If you need more than 1TB of data storage then the cloud might not be right for you.

Peripheral Needs

Building a PC is great but don’t forget to include all the peripherals you’ll need in the budget! Such as monitors, speakers, microphones, a keyboard and a mouse. All of these items have a huge impact on your workflow but unlike the workstation itself, are a much more personal choice.

Here are some of my own peripheral recommendations.

  • Monitor: Dell UltraSharp U2711 (289.99) or Dell UltraSharp 4k UP3216Q ($1,225.00)
  • Speakers: Audioengine A2, 2-way Powered Speaker System ($249.00 )
  • Headphones: Sennheiser HD 380 PRO ($149.95)
  • Mouse: Logitech MX Master Wireless Mouse ($83.99 )
  • Keyboard: Apple Aluminum Wired Keyboard for quite editing ($154.12).

One thing overlooked by too many freelance video editors is backup power solutions. What happens if your building’s power is interrupted? Can you imagine how much data can be lost, or worse yet corrupted? I recommend picking up a UPS.

Back-UPS: APC Back-UPS Pro 1000VA UPS Battery Backup & Surge Protector ($124.99 )

Recommended PC Builds For Video Editors

Most programs and applications have recommended minimum specs or hardware recommendations posted on their website. For example Adobe Premiere CC’s are listed here. This is a great place to start building from.

Here are my three top recommendations for building a PC:

Should You Rent A PC Instead of Buying?

Often people forget that they can rent PCs! Renting sounds expensive, but there’s three important advantages to consider:

  • You don’t have to replace obsolete hardware when the PC ages.
  • Should the PC breakdown the rental company will fix or replace it.
  • It costs less than buying it if you’re working on one, short, project.

Let’s say you’re working on a film but the director has asked you to come work on set. You may not want to buy a PC for what could be just a few days or week’s work. Many post-production houses rent PCs. Of course, a rental company probably won’t provide as deep customization as you may want, but they will undoubtedly meet your needs.

Renting a PC can also help you make up your mind about which computer exactly you'd like to build. You can rent a few different machines for a week or so and decide which you prefer. You’ll spend a couple hundred extra dollars, but you’ll be sure you got what you like.

Finally, if you need a PC for a very specific task that is expensive to set up (color correction for example because you may need expensive peripherals) there’s one other option: financing. Many PC building companies now offer financing, meaning small monthly installments over an extended period of time. In the long term you’ll definitely spend more money, however you can also gain access to an $8,000+ machine which can have a significant positive impact on your business. Other advantages of financing a PC include, customer support, extended warranties, and cheaper upgrade packages. Origin PC has a great explanation for financing its PCs.

The bottom line is if you're planning on using the machine for a long time it will ultimately be cheaper to buy it.

Origin Rent A PC

Wrap Up

The point of this guide is to give you a solid understanding of what to prioritize when building your editing workstation, regardless of if you’re building a workstation now or a year from now. Also if you read this far without scrolling through 90% of the article, congratulations, you now have the tools to make an informed and fiscally responsible decision. If you’d like to continue learning more about PCs and PC building below are links to useful online resources.

Useful Online Resources

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Socket and Chipset

How to build a custom PC for gaming, editing or coding

Editor’s note: An earlier version of this article included a video guide detailing similar steps on how to build a PC. Unfortunately, that video included a number of errors in the build process, and as a result we have removed it from this article. We have also updated this article to improve the order of the steps in the process.

Building your own Windows desktop has many advantages over buying one pre-built. You can get parts suited exactly to your needs, which can also potentially lead to cost savings. You can get a customized look that’s unique to your PC. You don’t have to deal with things like bloatware or annoying pre-installs. It’s also a learning experience: by building your own computer, you’ll have a better grasp on how it all works.

You don’t need to spend thousands of dollars to build a great desktop, though the more you do spend up front, the longer your PC will still be current. The beauty of building your own Windows desktop is you can price and build exactly for your needs. For example, if you’re a video editor, a lot of your build cost should be going toward extra RAM (more temporary storage and faster edits) and hard drive space to store your projects (an extra SSD, for example).

In our example build, we wanted a PC that would excel at playing high-end games now and for the next few years. For that need, we had to prioritize a great GPU (graphics card) so we could play popular titles at their highest graphical settings. And eventually, to upgrade to an RTX 2080, to support future titles in HD or 4K that use ray tracing. The budget we set for this was $2,000, all-in, including a license for Windows 10Home. That’s not cheap, but it’s enough to ensure that this PC will still be capable a few years down the road.

To make this process easier, I used PCPartPicker to organize the list of parts I’d use, ensure there were no compatibility issues between them, and make sure I’m within my budget. It’s a great way to make sure that everything you’re buying works together before you’ve got it all laid out on your workbench.

Precautions

Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge

Before we get started, there are a couple of things you should be wary of. First off, you are handling parts that draw several hundred watts of the power, so don’t ever touch the parts with the system powered on.

It’s smart to wear an anti-static bracelet (or ground yourself by touching a metal object / items bound to the floor) so that you don’t give your PC parts ESD (electrostatic discharge) and damage them in the process.

For your work surface, use a plastic or wooden table for the build process, or any other surface with a working mat that has anti-static properties. Additionally, have plenty of patience and two different sizes of Phillips screwdriver.

If you have to make a quick change — like adjust a graphics card or plug in an extra cable — make sure to first unplug the power cable from the wall outlet and power cycle the desktop by pressing the power button to get any remaining electricity out of the system.

In regards to the parts you’re using, always make sure the socket of the processor and motherboard combo you bought match (in my case, an LGA 1151 processor on an LGA 1151 motherboard). The socket type goes for the CPU cooler you’re using, too. (This is where PCPartsPicker comes in handy — it will tell you if you try to buy a processor that doesn’t fit on your selected motherboard and vice versa.)

The buying process

So what parts do you need for your build? Well, there are the essentials: RAM, a case, graphics, processor, cooler, thermal paste, operating system, motherboard, and finally, the power supply. Which manufacturer you use for each part is entirely up to you. However, there are some things you should keep in mind.

First, determine what your computer will be for. If it’s a gaming desktop, pay close attention to your RAM, CPU, and GPU trio — they’ll need to be the highest-end parts in the system. If you’re a video editor, drop costs on the graphics and spend more on storage and RAM, for example.

If you’re planning to not spend too much on parts now (or don’t know which to prioritize), but want to make easy upgrades in the future, pick a power supply with enough wattage to support higher-end parts (they require more power). An easy way of doing this: use PCPartPicker to estimate the power needed on your behalf, or you can look up the power requirements of each individual part.

In our build, the parts we’ve selected are currently using an estimated 374 watts, but by having an 850 watt PSU, I can add two graphics cards or a single, higher-end card without worrying about if I have enough power. Of course, if you’re on a tighter budget and decide you won’t be using any high-end parts, pick a power supply that’s just enough for the parts you have right now.

Once you’ve decided the “what for,” it’s time to determine what sort of desktop it will be. That means first deciding on a case. Obviously, the case determines the footprint of your completed build, but it also plays a big part in which parts you’ll be able to use inside of it.

There are three popular case types: mini-ITX (the smallest, most restrictions), mATX (compact, but easy to work with), and full ATX (typical heavy desktop tower). Each of those has their pros and cons, but most people will probably be fine with an mATX size case. The case size you choose will dictate your motherboard options: the Corsair 280X case I used for this build is an mATX case, which means I have to buy an mATX motherboard to fit inside of it.

My ATX power supply is produced by Corsair as well, so it’s designed to fit in this case, but you should always check your case specification and learn what motherboard and power supply size it can house best.

The rest of the components you’ll need fall into line after the motherboard: processor, cooling, RAM, GPU, and thermal paste. You’ll want to make sure that your motherboard has things like built-in Wi-Fi, Ethernet, sound, and Bluetooth, so you don’t have to worry about adding those components separately. Fortunately, it’s not hard to find a motherboard that has all of those things onboard already.

The build process

The first part of the build should be orderly laying out everything you’ve purchased: the processor, RAM, graphics, all the screws, cable ties, fan screens... everything. This way you won’t stop building midway and go looking for that elusive motherboard screw.

From there, where you start is up to you, but I prefer to start by mounting the power supply. By installing the PSU first, I can single out all the required wires, and make space for them. Generally, it’s a safe step that is difficult to mess up. Also, this is personal preference, but in all of my prior builds, I decided to install every major part in the desktop before I start wiring them to each other and to the power supply.

Next, mount that motherboard. Depending on your socket type (AMD or Intel), you may need to install a back brace for the motherboard, so do that first. Afterward, screwing down a handful of small screws, aligned with motherboard and the case, should keep this integral part of your DIY PC build in place.

The rest of the build is more about plug-and-play. For starters, installing RAM is a piece of cake: just align your gold connectors with the center of the slot, slowly pushing down till you hear a click. It is important to make sure you’re putting the RAM in the correct slots, however. If you have dual-channel RAM, which you most likely do, it needs to be installed in the dual-channels slots on the motherboard.

Installing your GPU is also a straightforward process, except you have to open the expansion bracket at the back of your case (it’s usually held down by screws). From there, align your card’s gold connector with the motherboard’s slot and the back of the case, pressing down firmly until you hear a click.

On the flipside, installing your processor is probably the most intense part of the build. CPUs are very delicate (and expensive), so you should only really place it down in the processor socket once. Open the socket using the latch, then align the arrow that appears on your chip with the corresponding arrow on the motherboard. Gently pull the latch down, ensuring the processorhasn’t moved out of place, at all.

At this point, you should install the radiator and fans that will cool off your desktop PC. I decided to mount the CPU cooler on top of the case, with two fans providing additional cooling on the front of the case. Again, this is all according to your own budget and specifications. However, it’s best in a micro ATX tower like this one to have two fans in your radiator and another two to cool the rest of the case.

Liquid cooling is entirely possible in a DIY build, but it’s more expensive than installing fans and only necessary for overclocking or intensive processing.

With your fans in place, you can finally proceed to applying thermal paste to the top of your processor. You should apply a paper-thin layer of paste spread evenly on top of the CPU. From there, screw in the remaining screws to secure your cooler on top of the processor.

  • Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge

So now that all your PC parts are installed and fit together inside the case, it’s time to wire everything. This is a tedious and tricky process that involves knowing exactly which cables to use (your motherboard manual does a good job of explaining this).

In this build, I’m using numerous connectors for the front panel’s ports, audio inputs, and power button. This also includes power cables to the graphics card, CPU, motherboard, fan controller, individual fans, pump, and Wi-Fi antennae.

The major cables (PCI-E, 24-pin, CPU, etc.) are usually labeled and not alike at the ends visually, so there shouldn’t be too much cause for confusion there. Where you might run into some hurdles is connecting the tiny three to four pin cables that correspond with your case’s ports and fans. If you can’t tell which pins these cables should go to, your motherboard’s manual usually has a map of every port / connection on the board. From there, it should be simple.

So now you’ve nearly reached the end of your PC build. At this point, you want to make sure all your wires are installed, connections to the motherboard are secure, power supply switch is turned on and plugged into a wall outlet. Next, connect your newly built desktop to a monitor, mouse, and keyboard setup.

Finally, hit the power button. You should see a screen that bears the brand name of your motherboard. This indicates a successful Power-On Self Test (or POST, for short).

Now, plug in a USB stick with Windows 10 installation files (which you can learn about here), restart the PC, and select your boot device as the USB drive you just inserted. Follow the on-screen prompt, enter your Windows license key, and finally reach the desktop.

However, you’re still not done yet! Download and install the relevant motherboard, GPU, cooling, lighting, and networking drivers or apps that will ensure everything is running as intended. This is non-negotiable and required if you actually want your new desktop PC to run at its peak.

Congrats, you’ve just built and configured a Windows desktop.

Future upgrades

Part of the appeal for building your own desktop are the future upgrades. In this PC, there’s an 8GB Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 supplied by PNY, but if you’re sticking with current generation graphics cards and want something with a bit more oomph, buy an 11GB GeForce 1080Ti Turbo card by ASUS; it should get you the extra frames needed on an ultrawide monitor, for example.

Meanwhile, 4K gameplay and ray tracing is out of the question for current Nvidia GeForce graphics cards, but thanks to the headroom afforded to me by the 850 watt power supply, I’ll be able to just swap out these cards for an RTX 2080 once those are available.

The versatility of swapping out current parts for new(er) ones — like a faster SSD, RGB backlit fans, more Corsair RAM — is one of the best aspects of PC building. And honestly, it’s just a lot of fun.

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Windows 10 includes Video Editor, a full-featured set of video creation and editing tools that tell your story with music, text, motion, and 3D effects. Video Editor is the successor to Movie Maker on Windows 10, with a focus on easy-to-use creative tools that enable you to tell your story.

Create your video

Create your new video

To create a new video that you can edit from start to finish

  1. Type video editor into the Search bar and select Video Editor to launch the app, or launch from the Start  menu.

  2. Select New video project.

  3. Name your video.

  4. Select the photos and videos you want to add to your Storyboard. You can even use Add from web to find content on Bing.

Once you have organized your Storyboard, you can change the look and feel of each photo or video clip.

  1. Select a button like Trim or Split for editing (video clips only).

  2. Select Duration to change the length of time a photo is displayed, or select multiple photos and then select Duration to change their duration all at once.

Add text

Adding text to a video

You can add Text to photos and video clips with ease. You can also create a Title Card from the Storyboard if you'd like to add text to a plain colored background. 

Simply select Text, type a title or phrase, then select a style and layout. You can also time the text to appear exactly when you want within your film.

Add music

Add music to your video

Select Background music to choose from several tracks and sync your video to the beat or select Custom audio to add and time your own music tracks, narration, or sound effects. 

Add effects

Using the power of Windows 10, you can add 3D objects or special effects to your photos and video clips. Use Filters to change your video clip or photo to black & white or other visual treatments. Select Motion to give photos more visual interest. Select Speed to speed up or slow down a video clip. If you want to change the orientation of a photo or video, just select the Rotate icon. If your photo or video is a different aspect ratio than your project, you can select the Remove or show black bars icon to zoom in and remove the letterboxing effect.

Add special effects to your video

To add 3D objects

  1. Select 3D library.

  2. Rotate and size the object and add animations as well. You can also add, move, and size 3D effects. You can also anchor an effect to a point in a video clip and watch the effect move along.

Publish your video

Publishing your video

When you have completed your project, select Finish video to publish your film. You can control video quality if you wish.

Additionally, you can Duplicate project to copy your video, and use Back up project to share your project with or save your progress to share between multiple users and devices. You can use Import backup to open one of your backed-up projects and continue working.

For a more detailed guide to Video Editor, you can check out aka.ms/videoeditoredu and let us know how you’re liking Video Editor using Send feedback

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Socket and Chipset

Building a Photo and Video Editing PC, Part 1: CPU and Motherboard

The CPU and motherboard are the beating heart of your PC build, and picking the right combo is key to building an awesome photo and video editing PC
Source: Pixabay, CC0

Building your own PC is the best way to get maximum photo- and video-editing performance for minimal spend, but the idea of putting together such a complex piece of tech scares most would-be builders away from even trying.

Fortunately, it's not as scary as it seems, and to prove it, we're going to teach you how to build your own creator PC while simultaneously building one ourselves! We've partnered with Intel, NVIDIA, MSI, Corsair and Seagate to get all of the parts we need to build a top-tier photo- and video-editing PC for the DPReview offices. And while we're building ours, we'll walk you though everything you need to know to plan out and build your own.

The series will be split into six parts:

  • Part 1: CPU and motherboard
  • Part 2: GPU, RAM and storage
  • Part 3: PSU, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2, case and cooler
  • Part 4: Monitor and calibration
  • Part 5: A step-by-step build guide
  • Part 6: Benchmarking our build

Jump to:

1. Choosing a CPU

Key Specs Important Features


3. Final Thoughts


Today, we'll tackle the beating heart of a PC build: the motherboard and CPU. With so many choices at such a vast variety of price points, selecting the right CPU and motherboard is probably the most complicated part of any build. It also dictates everything that comes after: the kind of RAM you can use, the number of storage drives you can connect, what sort of cooler you need to invest in, and on and on.

Today, we'll tackle the beating heart of a PC build: the motherboard and CPU.

Thankfully, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2, if you understand just a few basic details about these two components, it's pretty easy to find the right parts for your build without spending an arm and a leg on features you don't need or won't use.

Choosing a CPU

The CPU, or central processing unit, is the literal brain of your computer. Every time you type a letter on your keyboard, open a photo editing application, or slide the contrast slider in Lightroom, the CPU has to interpret that input and decide how it's going to fulfill the request.

How exactly it makes that decision is based on many different aspects of CPU architecture and design that we don't have time to get into. So for our purposes, we'll focus on the three most important questions you should ask yourself as a creator when shopping for a CPU:

  1. What are the most relevant specs?
  2. Should you go with Intel or AMD?
  3. What is overclocking and should you do it?

Classification, Clock Speed, and Cores

Knowing more is (almost) always better when making a buying decision, but you don't need to have a degree in Computer Science to pick a CPU that will meet your needs. There are really three specs that you should focus on: where your CPU fits into the Intel or AMD product line, the maximum clock speeds that it can reach, and the number of cores that it contains.

Let's take these one by one.

Classification: Generation, Family, and Tier

When building a PC, it's important that you pick a processor that was designed for the kind of work you're going to be doing, which means choosing a chip that is part of the right generation, family, and tier.

All of Intel and AMD's consumer CPUs fall into one of three broad processor families:

Intel
AMD
Family
Core
Core X
Xeon
Ryzen
Threadripper
EPYC
Target UserAmateur and EnthusiastEnthusiast to ProfessionalWorkstation and ServerAmateur to EnthusiastEnthusiast to ProfessionalWorkstation and Server

Each processor family is aimed at a different target market, and the vast majority of photo and video editors will be perfectly happy with an Intel Core or AMD Ryzen CPU. If you're a professional video editor working with super high-resolution source footage, then Intel Core X and AMD Threadripper are worth considering – since they contain more cores and PCIe lanes (more on these later), a PC with a Core X or Threadripper CPU is generally more expandable and better at tackling complex tasks like video encoding. Unless you're a professional VFX artist or you're working in 3D CAD design, you can ignore the Intel Xeon and AMD EPYC lineups entirely.

Each family is further split into different price and performance tiers. Intel's Core series is split into Core i3, Core i5, Core i7 and Core i9, while AMD's Ryzen series is split into Ryzen 3, Ryzen 5, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2, Ryzen 7, and Ryzen 9. Similarly, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2, Intel Core X can be had in Core i7 and Core i9 variations, while the Threadripper CPUs are split into three tiers that are embedded in the product number: 3960, 3970, and 3990.

Regardless of processor family, as the number gets higher, the performance gets better and the price increases.

Finally, each year Intel and AMD unveil the latest generation of every processor family. Intel's Core processors are up to 11th Gen (i.e. Intel Core i9-11900K), Core X is still on 10th gen (i.e. Intel Core i9-10900X) the AMD Ryzen family is up its fifth generation (i.e. Ryzen 9 5900X), and AMD's Threadripper CPUs are now on their third generation (i.e. AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X).

If you're doing run-of-the-mill photo and video editing, a mid- to top-tier Intel Core or AMD Ryzen CPU is more than powerful enough.

If you're doing run-of-the-mill photo and video editing, a mid-to-top-tier Intel Core or AMD Ryzen processor is more than powerful enough, and you can probably get away with a slightly older generation if money is tight. Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2 generations are pretty much always faster, even if the current gen CPU has the exact same clock speed and core count as last year, but the jump in performance between one generation and the next isn't always huge.

For the sake of simplicity, we recommend purchasing a CPU that is one of the latest two or three generations at the most, and opting for no less than a Core i5 or Ryzen 5. For Intel, that means a 9th, 10th, and 11th Gen Core i5, Core i7, or Core i9 CPU. For AMD, that means going with a Ryzen 3000, Ryzen 4000 or Ryzen 5000 series CPU that's Ryzen 5, Ryzen 7, or Ryzen 9.

If you need the extra processing power that comes with an Intel Core X or AMD Threadripper CPU, we'd recommend sticking with the latest generation: Core X 10th gen and Threadripper 3000.

Pretty much all modern-day CPUs contain multiple "cores" that can carry out tasks in parallel, allowing the processor to multi-task more efficiently.
Source: Intel

Core Count

Most modern CPUs are split into multiple physical "cores," each of which can carry out a single operation at a time. The more cores you have the more operations you can carry out at once, making the CPU better at multitasking during heavy workloads.

Furthermore, both Intel and AMD can split each physical core into two "threads," basically doubling the amount of work the CPU can do by allowing each core to do two things at the same time: one task per thread. On Intel processors, this is called "hyper-threading" while AMD calls this same trick "Simultaneous Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2 or SMT.

Whatever you call it, the oversimplified point is that: the more cores and threads a processor has, the more tasks it can carry out concurrently. But there are two catches that are very important.

  1. More cores generally means a lower clock speed per core, so while you can do more at the same time, each individual core is slightly slower
  2. Not every application is tuned to take advantage of multiple cores and/or threads

This is where it pays to do a little bit of research on the applications you use most. Pretty much all photo and video editing applications are now capable of taking advantage of multiple cores and threads, but video editors will generally see the biggest boost in performance as the core count exceeds 6 or 8 cores.

For creative work, we would suggest aiming for 6 cores and above.

Clock Speed

The main spec you'll see plastered at the top of every CPU product page is the clock speed, which comes in two flavors: base clock and boost clock. Clock speed is listed as a frequency in GHz (literally: billions of cycles per second) which is directly correlated to how many "instructions" or tasks a CPU can perform every second.

The base clock speed is the guaranteed number of cycles per second that the CPU can maintain at all times, while the boost clock is a faster speed that can only be maintained for a limited amount of time given enough power and sufficient cooling to keep the CPU from overheating.

Generally speaking, the higher the "clock speed" the faster your CPU and the faster your computer. However, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2, there are a few caveats.

As we mentioned above, more cores usually translates into a lower base clock, sacrificing raw single-core performance for multi-tasking capability. The other main caveat is that newer CPUs are able to carry out more "instructions per clock," squeezing more performance from the same exact clock speed as older generations. That's why we recommend only going back a few generations at the most when buying a CPU: any more than that and the gap in performance, even given the same basic clock speed and core count, may start to be noticeable.

Linus Tech Tips did a great explainer about this exact point recently, showing how two AMD Ryzen processors (an older Ryzen 3000 and a newer Ryzen 5000) with the exact same clock speed and core count nevertheless showed a significant difference in performance on various benchmarks.

AMD or Intel

There are some key differences between AMD and Intel processors that creators should keep in mind when shopping for a CPU.
Photo by Olivier Collet, CC0

The second (and by far more contentious) question is: AMD or Intel? In recent years, AMD has pulled ahead in terms of performance-per-watt, releasing some exceptional Ryzen and Threadripper CPUs that are more efficient and offer noticeably better multi-core performance, while Intel has generally stayed ahead in terms of single-core performance, hitting super-high boost clocks in excess of 5.0GHz on their Core i7 and Core i9 CPUs.

As we said above, this is where it pays to do a little research and find out how well your favorite photo- and video-editing applications can take advantage of multiple cores, and how many cores it can realistically tap into. Once you have an answer to that question, you can compare the price-to-performance ratio of 10th and 11th Gen Intel against equivalent Ryzen 4000 and Ryzen 5000 CPUs, and choose the option that looks like the best deal to you.

In recent years, AMD has pulled ahead in terms of performance-per-watt [.] while Intel has generally stayed ahead in terms of single-core performance.

Another major difference is expandability. Ryzen CPUs feature enough PCIe lanes to directly power a discrete Graphics Processing Unit, or GPU (16 lanes) and an M.2 SSD directly (4 lanes). Older Intel Core CPUs only featured enough PCIe lanes for the GPU, forcing users to route their NVMe SSD through the motherboard chipset, which means your SSD will compete with other peripherals for bandwidth, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2, potentially slowing things down. The latest 11th gen Core i5, Core i7, and Core i9 addressed this by adding another four lanes to the CPU, essentially catching up to AMD.

What are PCIe Lanes?

PCIe (Peripheral Component Interconnect Express) is the type of connection or "bus" used by all modern motherboards to link your CPU to other components in your PC. This connection is split into discrete "lanes" that can each carry a certain amount of data (1GB/s per lane for PCIe 3.0, and 2GB/s per lane for PCIe 4.0), and the more expansion cards and high-speed storage you put into your PC, the more "lanes" you'll need if you want to get the full speed out of every single peripheral all the time.

Every CPU has a discrete number of PCIe lanes available – usually 16 lanes dedicated to the main x16 PCIe slot on your board and (sometimes) 4 lanes that are connected directly to one of the M.2 SSD slots. Once those 20 lanes are used up, any additional PCIe components have to be connected through the motherboard's chipset, which communicates with the CPU through another 4 dedicated lanes.

Finally, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2, the last major consideration is Thunderbolt. If you want Thunderbolt 3 connectivity (which provides transfer speeds high enough to drive monitors and external GPUs in addition to just external storage, for example) you pretty much have to go with Intel. There are a couple of AMD-compatible motherboards with their own Thunderbolt controller built in (literally "a couple", as in two), but unless you're willing to seriously limit your options, Intel is the way to go for anyone who relies on Thunderbolt peripherals.

To overclock or not to overclock

Finally, there's the question of overclocking. Overclocking is pushing more voltage to an "unlocked" CPU to try and push it past its rated clock speed, and it's only possible if both your CPU and your motherboard support it. If you're going to overclock, you'll also need a beefier cooling solution, because pushing more voltage to your CPU means generating more heat.

Generally, we do not recommend Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2 your CPU, especially if you're building your first PC. The process itself isn't too difficult given a compatible CPU and motherboard, but it's not without risks. You risk lowering your CPU's Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2 or even bricking it if something goes horribly wrong, and even if you do everything right, you could lose the so-called "silicon lottery" and end up with a CPU that simply doesn't overclock very well.

Our recommendation? Take the extra $100 you were going to spend on a more powerful cooler and overclocking-compatible motherboard, and spend it on a slightly more powerful processor instead. Buying a more powerful processor and running it at stock is usually the wiser (if less "sexy") choice, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2, especially given the guaranteed 'turbo boost' clock speeds that both AMD and Intel's high-end CPUs are able to reach these days.

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Choosing a motherboard

If the CPU is the brain, the motherboard is the rest of the nervous system: Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2 connects your CPU to every other component in your PC, and it's critical that you pick a motherboard that is a) compatible with your CPU, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2, and b) includes all of the features you need to get the most out of the parts you've purchased.

Before we dive in, here's a helpful graphic that highlights some of the most important components and connections you'll find on a modern-day motherboard:

The layout of the standard motherboard, with common components labeled. Source: Intel

We won't dive into every component, nor are they all listed above, but the most important parts are:

  • The CPU socket – where the CPU plugs into the motherboard and is locked into place
  • The M.2 Connector – where modern, high-speed M.2 NVMe solid-state storage is attached.
  • The PCIe slots – where you will connect expansion cards that need to communicate a lot of data with the CPU. This includes your GPU, high-speed network cards, video capture cards, and more. Full-width slots are known as x16 slots, but there are also x1 slots and (more rare) x4 slots that can be used with cards that don't have to send and receive as much data.
  • The RAM slots – where you will place your RAM sticks, or DIMMs. Most standard motherboards come with four slots, which are split into two channels. Smaller motherboards might only include two slots, each with its own channel.

You don't need to understand how all of the above works in order to find a motherboard that suits your creative workflow. If we boil it down to the basics, there are really three main questions you need to ask yourself:

  1. What size/form factor works best for you?
  2. Are the "socket" and "chipset" compatible with your CPU?
  3. What specs and features should you prioritize?

Choose your form factor

Three standard sizes of motherboard make up the vast majority of your options: ATX, micro-ATX, and mini-ITX. ATX is the largest at 305 x 244mm (12 x 9.6 in), micro-ATX is a little bit smaller at 244 x 244 mm (9.6 x 9.6 in), Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2, and mini-ITX is an even smaller form factor at 170 x 170mm (6.7 x 6.7 in):

The three main sizes of motherboard are ATX, Micro-ATX, and Mini-ITX. Larger boards come with more PCIe slots, a larger port selection, and other features, but they make for a bulkier build.
Source: Intel

Mini-ITX builds are all the rage these days because they're so incredibly compact, allowing you to build a powerful PC inside a very small case that can comfortably sit on top of your desk. The trade-off is that you're going to give up some expandability, it's harder to build and cable-manage inside of a compact case, and you're probably going to pay a bit more for fewer features.

You don't need to understand how all of the above works in order to find a motherboard that suits your creative workflow.

Most Mini-ITX cases come with only two RAM slots and a single x16 PCIe slot, which will probably be taken up by your graphics card. Further expansion is out of the question.

For most creatives, and especially first-time PC builders, we would recommend going with either an ATX or Micro-ATX motherboard for your rig. The improved expandability is really nice if you want to add a high-speed network card or more RAM later on, and though it requires using a larger case, it will be easier to build in, and larger motherboards are usually better suited for high-performance workflows.

Match the socket and chipset to the CPU

Once you've picked a form factor, the next thing you have to get right is picking the socket and chipset that fits your CPU. Intel and AMD CPUs use different sockets (the physical platform that your CPU plugs into on the motherboard) and each generation of CPU will only work with certain "chipsets" (the "silicon backbone" that connects your CPU to every other component in your PC).

Both of these parts are critical. There's no way to work around it if you buy a motherboard with the wrong socket or an incompatible chipset: you'll just have to buy a new one and hope that someone on eBay wants yours (or that you bought from somewhere with a great return policy).

We've created the table below to guide you in choosing a motherboard with the right socket:

CPUGenerationCompatible Socket

Intel Core
8th and 9thLGA1151
10th and 11thLGA1200
Intel Core XAll GenerationsLGA2066
AMD RyzenAll GenerationsAM4

AMD Ryzen Threadripper
1000 and 2000TR4
3000sTRX4
The "socket" is where the plugs into the motherboard. If you don't pick a compatible socket, your CPU literally won't "fit" in your PC.
Source: Intel

Picking the right chipset is a bit more complicated. Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2 CPU is compatible with only one socket, but most CPUs are compatible with multiple chipsets that vary in terms of both features and price, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2. For example, the latest Intel processors are compatible with motherboards that use the Z590, H570, B560, or H510 chipsets, while the latest AMD Ryzen CPUs are compatible with motherboards that use the X570, B550, or A520 chipsets.

Generally speaking, lower letter chipsets like A- B- and H- are more affordable, with fewer features, while the Z- and X-series chipsets are aimed at power users who want the latest features, better components, and overclocking control. This is a wild oversimplification, but it should get you started as you do your research.

If you buy a motherboard with the wrong socket or an incompatible chipset, there's no way to work around it. You'll just have to buy a new one.

Start by exploring the various options on AMD and Intel's websites, pick two compatible chipsets that seem like a good fit for your needs, and then read a few reviews and comparisons online before you pull the trigger. If you want to double-check that compatibility isn't an issue, use a tool like PC Part Picker that will check the compatibility for you. Even if you don't buy from them, it's a good double-check to ensure everything is compatible before you drop $100-300 on a fancy paperweight.

PCIe 4.0, Thunderbolt, and high-speed networking

Once you've narrowed down your choices by finding a compatible socket and chipset, you'll want to take a close look at the specs to make sure that the actual branded motherboard you've landed on includes all of the features you'll need, or enough expandability to support them. This includes everything from Thunderbolt support, to high-speed networking, to sufficient I/O.

Each chipset includes a maximum number of USB ports, SATA connections, etc. that it can support, but that doesn't mean every motherboard that uses a particular chipset will include every single option. For example, the latest-and-greatest Intel Z590 chipset supports up to 37 USB ports of various types, but there isn't a single motherboard that includes all 37. That Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2 be . interesting.

The most important features for creatives to consider are: PCIe 4.0 support, Thunderbolt support, and high-speed networking.

If you go with an AMD Ryzen 3000 or newer or an Intel 11th generation CPU, your processor supports PCIe 4.0, which is twice as fast as the previous PCIe 3.0 standard, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2, but you need a motherboard/chipset that supports it as well. You probably won't see a huge benefit right now, but it acts as a buffer, giving you more options in the future as more and more high-speed devices take advantage of this new standard.

Next up is Thunderbolt support. Many high-end photo and video editing peripherals are Thunderbolt only, making this a must-have for many creative pros. For now, Thunderbolt support is still limited to more expensive, high-end boards. It's also limited (almost) exclusively to Intel boards. But we're keeping our fingers crossed that the merging of Thunderbolt 4 into the USB 4.0 spec means TB4 support for a wider variety of motherboards at a wider variety of price points in the very near future.

The most important features for creatives to consider are: PCIe 4.0 support, Thunderbolt support, and high-speed networking.

Finally, high-speed networking isn't super important for the everyday user, but 2.5Gbps, 5Gbps, or even 10Gbps networking can be a huge benefit if you're a photo or video professional who wants to work directly off of network attached storage. The more common 1Gbps ports built into many modern motherboards are great if you're just backing up your work, but if you're merging massive panoramas, putting together time-lapse films, or editing high-resolution video, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2, you'll Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2 quickly run into a bottleneck.

If you choose the right combination of CPU and motherboard, you'll end up with a PC that's blazing fast, highly expandable and future proof.
Photo by Rafael Pol, CC0

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Final thoughts

Of all the components inside your PC, the CPU and motherboard Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2 probably the most important and the most complicated. Believe it or not, we've only covered the bare bones minimum in this article: offering just enough information so that the first-time builder who wants a PC for photo and video editing can purchase their first CPU and motherboard with confidence.

That said, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2, there's always more to know and learn. If you like geeking out about this stuff and want to dive deeper before you start building, check out some popular YouTube channels like Linus Tech Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2, Gamer's Nexus, and JayZTwoCents, or visit some of the great PC hardware sites out there like Tom's Hardware and PC World.

Finally, if you enjoyed this simple guide to picking a CPU and motherboard for your creator PC build, stay tuned! In part 2, we'll talk about navigating the confusing world of GPUs, RAM, and storage solutions, and how to pick a good combination of the above for creative work.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Guide to Building A PC For Video Editing

Building A PC For Video Editing

Guest Post by Denis Ogorodov

Building a PC for video editing can mean faster rendering, smoother video playback, and a more reliable workflow, but it can easily turn into an expensive over or underpowered headache if you don’t do your research. This guide is intended to help freelance editors who are interested in building their own PC workstation but might not know exactly where to begin. This guide will shed light on what each PC component does, and what hardware you should prioritize for editing.

Read about the system Denis ultimately built

Question 1: What’s Your Budget?

Start by asking yourself, “what’s my budget?” Think of your new PC as a business investment. In other words don’t ask, “how much should I spend?” instead ask “will I get a good return on this investment?” Having set up this mindset, you will have a much better idea of what you are willing to spend. A good thousand dollar monitor might sound like a luxury if you’re editing part-time, but if you are spending 12+ hours a day staring at monitors, and this monitor helps alleviate eye-strain or back pain, then $1,000 dollars for 3+ years of work doesn’t sound so unreasonable.

My advice for full time, professional editors is to consider spending around $2,500-$3,000 on a workstation. Newer editors who are working part-time, or are still in school, should aim around $1,500. You can build a very beefy PC for $1,500. If PC building is too overwhelming, or you’re on the move and don’t mind spending closer to $2,000 consider a MacBook Pro, they are some of the best laptops when it comes to video editing, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2, no joke.

That said, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2, if you want something that can rip through 4K R3D and Arri RAW, playback realtime while color grading footage, render and transcode footage within minutes instead of hours, things are going to get expensive, fast. Especially when it comes to dependable and fast storage solutions. Be prepared to spend $6,000-8,000 for your build, and this is not including proper reference monitors for color grading (like these) which start at around $3,000.

Flanders Scientific

Question 2: What Editing Programs Do You Use?

Next, ask yourself “What editing apps do I use?” If you are a video editor you’re probably using one of three programs: Avid, Premiere, or Resharper Ultimate 2019.3.3 Crack With Activation Code (Latest) Archives Cut Pro X. In addition, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2, if you create visual effects or color correct then you might use: After Effects, Resolve, Nuke, Autodesk Smoke, Cinema 4D, or even Unity.

As you may know, these programs have very different hardware needs:

  • Da Vinci Resolve relies heavily on the GPU. I recommend at least a GTX 1060 - GB GPU for this app. If budget allows upgrade to a GTX 1070 or if you want to color 4K smoothly, a 1080ti would be best.
  • Compositing programs like After Effects and Nuke benefit from a lot of RAM. I recommend at least 32GB. If you’re heavily using these apps go with 64GB.
  • Transcoding programs like Compressor and Adobe Media Encoder rely heavily on your CPU. You’ll need at least an Intel 8700k or an AMD 1600x processor if you’re expecting to do a decent amount of transcoding.
  • Editing programs like Premiere, Media Composer, and FCPX, in addition to your CPU, and GPU, rely heavily on the speed of your HDDs. You’ll want at least a Samsung 850 Evo SSD for your O.S. and an external raid such as a G-Raid or, if budget allows, a Pegasus 3. If your budget is really tight you might consider a single internal HDD like one of these Barracudas. They are impressively speedy.

Barracudas Motherboard

Question 3: What kind of footage do you work with?

Understanding and predicting your needs when it comes to file formats, codecs and transcoding will help you understand how much CPU processing power, and hard drive storage you really need.

  • Do you mostly edit 30 second promos or two hour documentaries?
  • What camera formats do you mostly edit?
  • What about resolution? Are you expecting to edit in 1080p or 4k?
  • Are you also color correcting, or adding visual effects to your projects?
  • Do you plan on using a proxy workflow, and finishing your project somewhere else?

RAM memory chip

What’s inside a PC?

Let’s define some of the components of a PC that can be specified when building your own machine. Mac people, pay attention! You might not be used to this:

  • CPU (aka Central Processing Unit) - This is the computer's brain. It is responsible for running all the programs and applications on your machine, including your operating system (Windows).
  • CPU Cooler - CPUs get hot! To keep them running safely and efficiently it is important to use a heatsink and fans to keep the temperature low and stable.
  • Motherboard - If the CPU is the brain, then the motherboard is the body of the machine, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2, it holds and connects all your comments and allows them to talk to each other.
  • RAM (aka memory) - Is your computer’s short-term memory (as opposed to your hard drive which is long term memory). It allows the computer to run multiple programs at the same time, and reduces the amount of times you have to access your slower hard drives or long-term memory.
  • Internal hard drives - These are your computer’s long-term memory. They store all of your files and data safely. When the computer is turned off this data is preserved and can be accessed again at a later date. RAM gets cleared out.
  • GPU (video card) - A video card is designed to render graphics and helps alleviate some of the computational stress off of the CPU, especially when it comes to rendering.
  • VRAM - Is the short-term memory of your GPU. The more VRAM your GPU has the more graphics you can run at the same time. Operating System - Windows, Linux, or Mac OS (hackintosh). This guide focuses on windows.
  • Peripherals - These are elements that plug into the outside of your computer like your monitor, speakers, keyboard and mouse.

Hardware Needs For Video Editors

When you look up build guides online they start with the CPU, but we’re going to start a layer deeper than that and look at the motherboard.

Motherboard Needs

When it comes to future proofing your PC, or allowing for upgradability the unsung 8signs Firewall Remote Administration Tool v2.26 crack serial keygen is PCIe. PCIe are slots in your motherboard that allow you to customize your PC with additional hardware such as professional sound cards, additional graphics cards, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2 render cards like the RED Rocket, 10/100Gbe Ethernet cards for NAS/Network solutions, thunderbolt expansion, SAS, NVMe SSDs, raid cards, capture cards and so much more!

What are PCIe lanes? Lanes are electric circuits that determine how much data and power can be transferred between the CPU and the components plugged into the motherboard through the motherboard’s slots (like a GPU for example). Most motherboards on the market (like this one) have fewer PCIe lanes then what I’d recommend for video editing, ranging from a total of 16-20. For video editing I recommend a motherboard and CPU combination that support a total of 40+ (like this one).

Gaming Motherboard

PCIe lanes are shared by slots on your motherboard. A slot is where hardware components are plugged into the motherboard. A motherboard usually has 4-5 slots of varying sizes, ranging from x1 to x16 lanes each (this is the length of the slot). Of course the higher the total amount of PCIe lanes supported by your motherboard and CPU, the more hardware can be installed on your machine.

For a video editor your peripherals, meaning external devices like monitors, keyboards, and editing surfaces, also might dictate what kind of motherboard you purchase for your work station. For example a colorist might want a Resolve control panel and an SDI output card, while an editor might want an audio mixer. These will each require a slightly different connector.

Black Magic Deck Link

Building a computer with a great CPU is useless to many editors if the motherboard can’t support Thunderbolt for example. With that said let’s look at what features an Editor should prioritize.

CPU Needs

Like it or not a lot of software including Adobe Premiere, doesn’t scale well with dual CPUs (not to be confused with a single CPU’s core count). With modern CPUs reaching high core counts (like the 7900x) while keeping respectable clock speeds, dual CPUs aren’t always advantageous for video editing tasks. This is true even for 4K workflows as this article explains.

Intel Xeon CPUs are often marketed to support two things: dual CPUs and ECC Memory. As we’ve mentioned Dual CPUs aren’t necessary, but what about ECC Memory? ECC Memory is short for Error Correcting Code Memory. In appearance and most functions this is the same RAM any computer uses, however ECC Memory is designed to detect and correct data corruption, really cool stuff. It sounds great on paper, but the type of errors we are dealing with only affect programs related to financial computing, or precise instruments for scientific research, not video editing. For this reason, ECC Memory is unnecessary for Video Editing, not to mention expensive. Using Xeon CPU’s severely limits your motherboard options, and consequently RAM choices. 

Intel Processors

RAM Needs

If you’re editing mostly 1080p footage promos with little to no compositing effects work you can easily work with 16GB of RAM. However, if you work on longer videos (feature length films for example), or create a lot of visual effects, I would recommend a minimum of 32GB. If you’re editing and compositing 4K footage then 32GB will be enough most of the time. If you're working exclusively with 4K or even larger frame sizes then I recommend at least 64GB of RAM.

Thunderbolt (Interface for external peripherals)

Thunderbolt is an interface that many video editors are familiar with, and very much value. Thunderbolt technology allows an editor to further increase the flexibility of your PC. Thunderbolt acts as an external PCIe extension, meaning you can plug-in heavy data reliant devices such as GPUs or a DAS system. Thunderbolt can be used for external GPU’s via a PCIe Box, fast raid systems, 5K+ monitors, and daisy chaining hard drives (a video editing friendly feature). Thunderbolt 3 is the latest iteration of the technology and supports up to 40Gbps of transfer speed, that’s a potential of 5,000 MB of data transferred per second! This bandwidth allows you to use some of the fastest external storage solutions available, and consequently smooth playback of high-resolution and high-bitrate files, such as 8K R3D RAW files.

Yet, Thunderbolt compatible motherboards are uncommon because of it’s slow adoption rate and costs. However, Thunderbolt (an Intel technology) is now royalty-free and PC hardware in 2018 and 2019 is showing signs of wide adoption. Frankly if you’re editing mostly 1080p videos then USB 3.1 will be a good enough connection. As soon as you start venturing towards an external raid system that holds terabytes of data, and 4K workflows, Thunderbolt 3 becomes a lot more attractive.

There are alternatives to Thunderbolt on both PC and Mac for connecting to a hard drive or shared storage. Many NAS devices connect via 10GBe or even 100Gbe ethernet cards. Thunderbolt is only compatible with specific Intel CPUs and no AMD CPUs (for now).

If Thunderbolt is a must, I recommend Gigabyte or Asus motherboards, specifically their x299 motherboards which both support PCIe Thunderbolt cards such as the GC-Alpine-Ridge and the Thunderbolt EX3.

Thunderbolt 3

(learn more on PC Mag).  

Hard Drives or Storage Systems Needs

Unlike other types of digital artists, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2, editors are highly dependent on large storage volumes with redundancy, backups, and consistent transfer speeds, fast access times at a large bandwidth. Storage is something you really can’t cut corners on, and if you are, you’re shooting yourself in the foot. Video editors, transfer, copy and transcode terabytes of data, the last project I worked on had 18 Terabytes of data. Luckily now more than ever there are many storage solutions available. Storage is a giant topic, that deserves a whole post of its own but I will list below some common storage solutions.

  • Hard Disk Drives or HDDs, is your most common data storage device. They are slow, cheap and somewhat reliable. They are great for backup, transferring footage from set to post, and shipping.
  • Solid State Drives or SSDs are faster than regular HDDs but prohibitively expensive for large projects. They have significantly faster read and write speeds as such they can playback footage with a significantly higher bit rate.
  • A RAID system (Redundant Array of Independent Disks) is a data storage technology that allows you to combine multiple HDDs into one unit. This is done for both redundancy to minimize the risks of data loss but more importantly to improve read and write speeds.
  • Cloud Storage like Google Drive, and DropBox are useful for backing up project files or presets, but not for storing large files like your footage. If you need more than 1TB of data storage then the cloud might not be right for you.

Peripheral Needs

Building a PC is great Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2 don’t forget to include all the peripherals you’ll need in the budget! Such as monitors, speakers, microphones, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2, a keyboard and a mouse. All of these items have a huge impact on your workflow but unlike the workstation itself, are a much more personal choice.

Here are some of my own peripheral recommendations.

  • Monitor: Dell UltraSharp U2711 (289.99) or Dell UltraSharp 4k UP3216Q ($1,225.00)
  • Speakers: Audioengine A2, 2-way Powered Speaker System ($249.00 )
  • Headphones: Sennheiser HD 380 PRO ($149.95)
  • Mouse: Logitech MX Master Wireless Mouse ($83.99 )
  • Keyboard: Apple Aluminum Wired Keyboard for quite editing ($154.12).

One thing overlooked by too many freelance video editors is backup power solutions. What happens if your building’s power is interrupted? Can you imagine how much data can be lost, or worse yet corrupted? I recommend picking up a UPS.

Back-UPS: APC Back-UPS Pro 1000VA UPS Battery Backup & Surge Protector ($124.99 )

Recommended DaVinci Resolve Studio crack 17 & Keygen Builds For Video Editors

Most programs and applications have recommended minimum specs or hardware recommendations posted on their website. For example Adobe Premiere CC’s are listed here. This is a great place to start building from.

Here are my three top recommendations for building a PC:

Should You Rent A PC Instead of Buying?

Often people forget that they can rent PCs! Renting sounds expensive, but there’s three important advantages to consider:

  • You don’t have to replace obsolete hardware when the PC ages.
  • Should the PC breakdown the rental company will fix or replace it.
  • It costs less than buying it if you’re working on one, short, project.

Let’s say you’re working on a film but the director has asked you to come work on set. You may not want to buy a PC for what could be just a few days or week’s work. Many post-production houses rent PCs. Of course, a rental company probably won’t provide as deep customization as you may want, but they will undoubtedly meet your needs.

Renting a PC can also help you make up your mind about which computer exactly you'd like to build. You can rent a few different machines for a week or so and decide which you prefer. You’ll spend a couple hundred extra dollars, but you’ll be sure you got what you like.

Finally, if you need a PC for a very specific task that is expensive to set up (color correction for example because you may need expensive peripherals) there’s one other option: financing. Many PC building companies now offer financing, meaning small monthly installments over an extended period of time. In the long term you’ll definitely spend more money, however you can also gain access to an $8,000+ machine which can have a significant Download Coreldraw x7 Gratuito ~ Monte Download impact on your business. Other advantages of financing a PC include, customer support, extended warranties, and cheaper upgrade packages. Origin PC has a great explanation for financing its PCs.

The bottom line is if you're planning on using the machine for a long time it will ultimately be cheaper to buy it.

Origin Rent A PC

Wrap Up

The point of this guide is to give you a solid understanding of what to prioritize when building your editing workstation, regardless of if you’re building a workstation now or a year from now. Also if you read this far without scrolling through 90% of the article, congratulations, you now have the tools to make an informed and fiscally responsible decision. If you’d like to continue learning more about PCs and PC building below are links to useful online resources.

Useful Online Resources

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Windows 10 includes Video Editor, a full-featured set of video creation and editing tools that tell your story with music, text, motion, and 3D effects. Video Editor is the successor to Movie Maker on Windows 10, with a focus on easy-to-use creative tools that enable you to tell your story.

Create your video

Create your new video

To create a new video that you can edit from start to finish

  1. Type video editor into the Search bar and Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2 Video Editor to launch the app, or launch from the Start  menu.

  2. Select New video project.

  3. Name your video.

  4. Select the photos and videos you want to add to your Storyboard. You can even use Add from web to find content on Bing.

Once you have organized your Storyboard, you can change the look and feel of each photo or video clip.

  1. Select a button like Trim or Split for editing (video clips only).

  2. Select Duration to change the length of time a photo is displayed, or select multiple photos and then select Duration to change their duration all at once.

Add text

Adding text to a video

You can add Text to photos and video clips with ease. You can also create a Title Card from the Storyboard if you'd like to add text to a plain colored background. 

Simply select Text, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2 a title or phrase, then select a style and layout. You can also time the text to appear exactly when you want within your film.

Add music

Add music to your video

Select Background music to choose from several tracks and sync your video to the beat or select Custom audio to add and time your own music tracks, narration, or sound effects. 

Add effects

Using the power of Windows 10, you can add 3D objects or special effects to your photos and video clips. Use Filters to change your video clip or photo to black & white or other visual treatments. Select Motion to give photos more visual interest. Select Speed to speed up or slow down a video clip. If you want to change the orientation of a photo or video, just select the Rotate icon. If your photo or video is a different aspect ratio than Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2 project, you can select the Remove or show black bars icon to zoom in and remove the letterboxing effect.

Add special effects to your video

To add 3D objects

  1. Select 3D library.

  2. Rotate and size the object and add animations as well. You can also add, move, and size 3D effects. You can also anchor an effect to a point in a video clip and watch the effect move along.

Publish your video

Publishing your video

When Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2 have completed your project, select Finish video to publish your film. You can control video quality if you wish.

Additionally, you can Duplicate project to copy your video, and use Back up project to share Movavi Video Editor 21.3.0 Activation Key with Crack Latest 2021 Version project with or save your progress to share between multiple users and devices. You can use Import backup to open one of your backed-up projects and continue working.

For a more detailed Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2 to Video Editor, you can check out aka.ms/videoeditoredu and let us know how you’re liking Video Editor using Send feedback

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

How to build a custom PC for gaming, editing or coding

Editor’s note: An earlier version of this article included a video guide detailing similar steps on how to build a PC. Unfortunately, that video included a number of errors in the build process, and as a result we have removed it from this article. We have also updated this article to improve the order of the steps in the process.

Building your own Windows desktop has many advantages over buying one pre-built. You can get parts suited exactly to your needs, which can also potentially lead to cost savings. You can get a customized look that’s unique to your PC. You don’t Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2 to deal with things like bloatware or annoying pre-installs. It’s also a learning experience: by building your own computer, you’ll have a better grasp on how it all works.

You don’t need to spend thousands of dollars to build a great desktop, though the more you do spend up front, the longer your PC will still be current. The beauty of building your own Windows desktop is you can price and build exactly for your needs. For example, if you’re a video editor, a lot of your build cost should Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2 going toward extra RAM (more temporary storage and faster edits) and hard drive space to store your projects (an extra SSD, for example).

In our example build, we wanted a PC that would excel at playing high-end games now and for the next few years. For that need, we had to prioritize a great GPU (graphics card) so we could play popular titles at their highest graphical settings. And eventually, to upgrade to an RTX 2080, to support future titles in HD or 4K that use ray tracing. The budget we set for this was $2,000, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2, all-in, including a license for Windows 10Home. That’s not cheap, but it’s Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2 to ensure that this PC will still be Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2 a few years down the road.

To Macrium Reflect 8.0.6161 Full Version this process easier, I used PCPartPicker to organize the list of parts I’d use, ensure there were no compatibility issues between them, and make sure I’m within my budget. It’s a great way to make sure that everything you’re buying works together before you’ve got it all laid out on your workbench.

Precautions

Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge

Before we get started, there are a couple of things you should be wary of. First off, you are handling parts that draw several hundred watts of the power, so don’t ever touch the parts with the system powered on.

It’s smart to wear an anti-static bracelet (or ground yourself by touching a metal object / items bound to the floor) so that you don’t give your PC parts ESD (electrostatic discharge) and damage them in the process.

For your work surface, use a plastic or wooden table for the build process, or any other surface with a working mat that has anti-static properties. Additionally, have plenty of patience and two different sizes of Phillips screwdriver.

If you have to make a quick change — like adjust a graphics card or plug in an extra cable — make sure to first unplug the power cable from the wall outlet and power cycle the desktop by pressing the power button to get any remaining electricity out of the system.

In regards to the parts you’re using, always make sure the socket of the processor and motherboard combo you bought match (in my case, an LGA 1151 processor on an LGA 1151 motherboard). The socket type goes for the CPU cooler you’re using, too. (This is where PCPartsPicker comes in handy — it will tell you if you try to buy a processor that doesn’t fit on your selected motherboard and vice versa.)

The buying process

So what parts do you need for your build? Well, there are the essentials: RAM, a case, graphics, processor, cooler, thermal paste, operating system, motherboard, and finally, the power supply. Which manufacturer you use for each part is entirely up to you, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2. However, there are some things you should keep in mind.

First, determine what your computer will be for. If it’s a gaming desktop, pay close attention to your RAM, CPU, and GPU trio — they’ll need to be the highest-end parts in the system. If you’re a video editor, drop costs on the graphics and spend more on storage and RAM, for example.

If you’re planning to not spend too much on parts now (or don’t know which to prioritize), but want to make easy upgrades in the future, pick a power supply with enough wattage to support higher-end parts (they require more power). An easy way of doing this: use PCPartPicker to estimate the power needed on your behalf, or you can look up the power requirements of each individual part.

In our build, the parts we’ve selected are currently using an estimated 374 watts, but by having an 850 watt PSU, I can add two graphics cards or a single, higher-end card without worrying about if I have enough power, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2. Of course, if you’re on a tighter budget and decide you won’t be using any high-end parts, pick a power supply that’s just enough for the parts you have right now.

Once you’ve decided the “what for,” it’s time to determine what sort of desktop it will be. That means first deciding on a case. Obviously, the case determines the footprint of your completed build, but it also plays a big part in which parts you’ll be able to use inside of it. Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2 are three popular case types: mini-ITX (the smallest, most restrictions), mATX (compact, but easy to work with), and full ATX (typical heavy desktop tower). Each of those has their pros and cons, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2, but most people will probably be fine with an mATX size case. The case size you choose will dictate your motherboard options: the Corsair 280X case I used for this build is an mATX case, which means I have to buy an mATX motherboard to fit inside Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2 it.

My ATX power supply is produced by Corsair as well, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2, so it’s designed to fit in this case, but you Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2 always check your case specification and learn what motherboard and power supply size it can house best.

The rest of the components you’ll need fall into line after the motherboard: processor, cooling, RAM, GPU, and thermal paste. You’ll want to make sure that your motherboard has things like built-in Wi-Fi, Ethernet, sound, and Bluetooth, so you don’t have to worry about adding those components separately. Fortunately, it’s not hard to find a motherboard that has all of those things onboard already.

The build process

The first part of the build should be orderly laying out everything you’ve purchased: the processor, RAM, graphics, all the screws, cable ties, fan screens. everything. This way you won’t stop building midway and go looking for that elusive motherboard screw.

From there, where you start is up to you, but I prefer to start by mounting the power supply. By installing the PSU first, I can single out all the required wires, and make space for them. Generally, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2, it’s a safe step that is difficult to mess up. Also, this is personal preference, but in all of my prior builds, I decided to install every major part in the desktop before I start wiring them to each other and to the power supply.

Next, mount that motherboard. Depending on your socket type (AMD or Intel), you may need to install a back brace for the motherboard, so do that first. Afterward, screwing down a handful of small screws, aligned with motherboard and the case, should keep this integral part of your DIY PC build in place.

The rest of the build is more about plug-and-play. For starters, installing RAM is a piece of cake: just align your gold connectors with the center of the slot, slowly pushing down till you hear a click. It is important to make sure you’re putting the RAM in the correct slots, however. If you have dual-channel RAM, which you most likely do, it needs to be installed in the dual-channels slots on the motherboard.

Installing your GPU is also a straightforward process, except you have to open the expansion bracket at the back of your case (it’s usually held down by screws). From there, align your card’s gold connector with the motherboard’s slot and the back of the case, pressing down firmly until you hear a click.

On the flipside, installing your processor is probably the most intense part of the build. CPUs are very delicate (and expensive), so you should only really place it down in the processor socket once. Open the socket using the latch, then align the arrow that appears on your chip with the corresponding arrow on the motherboard. Gently pull the latch down, ensuring the processorhasn’t moved out of place, at all, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2.

At this point, you should install the radiator and fans that will cool off your desktop PC. I decided to mount the CPU cooler on top of the case, with two fans providing additional cooling on the front of the case. Again, this is all according to your own budget and specifications. However, it’s best in a micro ATX tower like this one to have two fans in your radiator and another two to cool the rest of the case.

Liquid cooling is entirely possible in a DIY build, but it’s more expensive than installing fans and only necessary for overclocking or intensive processing.

With your fans in place, you can finally proceed to applying thermal paste to the top of your processor. You should apply a paper-thin layer of paste spread evenly on top of the CPU. From there, screw in the remaining screws to secure your cooler on top of the processor.

  • Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge

So now that all your PC parts are installed and fit together inside the case, it’s time to wire everything. This is a tedious and tricky process that involves knowing exactly which cables to use (your motherboard manual does a good job of explaining this).

In this build, I’m using numerous connectors for the front panel’s ports, audio inputs, and power button. This also includes power cables to the graphics card, CPU, motherboard, fan controller, individual fans, pump, and Wi-Fi antennae.

The major cables (PCI-E, Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2, 24-pin, CPU, etc.) are usually labeled and not alike at the ends visually, so there shouldn’t be too much cause for confusion there. Where you might run into some hurdles is connecting the tiny three to four pin cables that correspond with your case’s ports and fans. If you can’t tell which pins these cables should go to, your motherboard’s manual usually has a map of every port / connection on the board. From there, it should be simple.

So now you’ve nearly reached the end of your PC build. At this point, you want to make sure all your wires are installed, connections to the motherboard are secure, power supply switch is turned on and plugged into a wall outlet. Next, connect your newly built desktop to a monitor, mouse, and keyboard setup.

Finally, hit the power button. You should see a screen that bears the brand name of your motherboard. This indicates a successful Power-On Self Test (or POST, for short).

Now, plug in a USB stick with Windows 10 installation files (which you can learn about here), restart the PC, and select your boot device as the USB drive you just inserted. Follow the on-screen prompt, enter your Windows license key, and finally reach the desktop.

However, you’re still not done yet! Download and install the relevant motherboard, GPU, cooling, lighting, and networking drivers or apps that will ensure everything is running as intended. This is non-negotiable and required if you actually want your new desktop PC to run at its peak.

Congrats, you’ve just built and configured a Windows desktop.

Future upgrades

Part of the appeal for building your own desktop are the future upgrades. In this PC, there’s an 8GB Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 supplied by PNY, but if you’re sticking with current generation graphics cards and want something with a bit more oomph, buy an 11GB GeForce 1080Ti Turbo card by ASUS; it should get you the extra frames needed on an ultrawide monitor, for example.

Meanwhile, 4K gameplay and ray tracing is out of the question for current Nvidia GeForce graphics cards, but thanks to the headroom afforded to me by the 850 watt power supply, I’ll be able to just swap out these cards for an RTX 2080 once those are available.

The versatility of swapping out current parts for new(er) ones — like a faster SSD, RGB backlit fans, more Corsair RAM — is one of the best aspects of PC building. And honestly, it’s just a lot of fun.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]
Overclocking


2. Choosing a Motherboard

Form Factor

Editor | Pirate PC - Part 2 - theme, interesting

Overclocking


2. Choosing a Motherboard

Form Factor

How to build a custom PC for gaming, editing or coding

Editor’s note: An earlier version of this article included a video guide detailing similar steps on how to build a PC. Unfortunately, that video included a number of errors in the build process, and as a result we have removed it from this article. We have also updated this article to improve the order of the steps in the process.

Building your own Windows desktop has many advantages over buying one pre-built. You can get parts suited exactly to your needs, which can also potentially lead to cost savings. You can get a customized look that’s unique to your PC. You don’t have to deal with things like bloatware or annoying pre-installs. It’s also a learning experience: by building your own computer, you’ll have a better grasp on how it all works.

You don’t need to spend thousands of dollars to build a great desktop, though the more you do spend up front, the longer your PC will still be current. The beauty of building your own Windows desktop is you can price and build exactly for your needs. For example, if you’re a video editor, a lot of your build cost should be going toward extra RAM (more temporary storage and faster edits) and hard drive space to store your projects (an extra SSD, for example).

In our example build, we wanted a PC that would excel at playing high-end games now and for the next few years. For that need, we had to prioritize a great GPU (graphics card) so we could play popular titles at their highest graphical settings. And eventually, to upgrade to an RTX 2080, to support future titles in HD or 4K that use ray tracing. The budget we set for this was $2,000, all-in, including a license for Windows 10Home. That’s not cheap, but it’s enough to ensure that this PC will still be capable a few years down the road.

To make this process easier, I used PCPartPicker to organize the list of parts I’d use, ensure there were no compatibility issues between them, and make sure I’m within my budget. It’s a great way to make sure that everything you’re buying works together before you’ve got it all laid out on your workbench.

Precautions

Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge

Before we get started, there are a couple of things you should be wary of. First off, you are handling parts that draw several hundred watts of the power, so don’t ever touch the parts with the system powered on.

It’s smart to wear an anti-static bracelet (or ground yourself by touching a metal object / items bound to the floor) so that you don’t give your PC parts ESD (electrostatic discharge) and damage them in the process.

For your work surface, use a plastic or wooden table for the build process, or any other surface with a working mat that has anti-static properties. Additionally, have plenty of patience and two different sizes of Phillips screwdriver.

If you have to make a quick change — like adjust a graphics card or plug in an extra cable — make sure to first unplug the power cable from the wall outlet and power cycle the desktop by pressing the power button to get any remaining electricity out of the system.

In regards to the parts you’re using, always make sure the socket of the processor and motherboard combo you bought match (in my case, an LGA 1151 processor on an LGA 1151 motherboard). The socket type goes for the CPU cooler you’re using, too. (This is where PCPartsPicker comes in handy — it will tell you if you try to buy a processor that doesn’t fit on your selected motherboard and vice versa.)

The buying process

So what parts do you need for your build? Well, there are the essentials: RAM, a case, graphics, processor, cooler, thermal paste, operating system, motherboard, and finally, the power supply. Which manufacturer you use for each part is entirely up to you. However, there are some things you should keep in mind.

First, determine what your computer will be for. If it’s a gaming desktop, pay close attention to your RAM, CPU, and GPU trio — they’ll need to be the highest-end parts in the system. If you’re a video editor, drop costs on the graphics and spend more on storage and RAM, for example.

If you’re planning to not spend too much on parts now (or don’t know which to prioritize), but want to make easy upgrades in the future, pick a power supply with enough wattage to support higher-end parts (they require more power). An easy way of doing this: use PCPartPicker to estimate the power needed on your behalf, or you can look up the power requirements of each individual part.

In our build, the parts we’ve selected are currently using an estimated 374 watts, but by having an 850 watt PSU, I can add two graphics cards or a single, higher-end card without worrying about if I have enough power. Of course, if you’re on a tighter budget and decide you won’t be using any high-end parts, pick a power supply that’s just enough for the parts you have right now.

Once you’ve decided the “what for,” it’s time to determine what sort of desktop it will be. That means first deciding on a case. Obviously, the case determines the footprint of your completed build, but it also plays a big part in which parts you’ll be able to use inside of it.

There are three popular case types: mini-ITX (the smallest, most restrictions), mATX (compact, but easy to work with), and full ATX (typical heavy desktop tower). Each of those has their pros and cons, but most people will probably be fine with an mATX size case. The case size you choose will dictate your motherboard options: the Corsair 280X case I used for this build is an mATX case, which means I have to buy an mATX motherboard to fit inside of it.

My ATX power supply is produced by Corsair as well, so it’s designed to fit in this case, but you should always check your case specification and learn what motherboard and power supply size it can house best.

The rest of the components you’ll need fall into line after the motherboard: processor, cooling, RAM, GPU, and thermal paste. You’ll want to make sure that your motherboard has things like built-in Wi-Fi, Ethernet, sound, and Bluetooth, so you don’t have to worry about adding those components separately. Fortunately, it’s not hard to find a motherboard that has all of those things onboard already.

The build process

The first part of the build should be orderly laying out everything you’ve purchased: the processor, RAM, graphics, all the screws, cable ties, fan screens... everything. This way you won’t stop building midway and go looking for that elusive motherboard screw.

From there, where you start is up to you, but I prefer to start by mounting the power supply. By installing the PSU first, I can single out all the required wires, and make space for them. Generally, it’s a safe step that is difficult to mess up. Also, this is personal preference, but in all of my prior builds, I decided to install every major part in the desktop before I start wiring them to each other and to the power supply.

Next, mount that motherboard. Depending on your socket type (AMD or Intel), you may need to install a back brace for the motherboard, so do that first. Afterward, screwing down a handful of small screws, aligned with motherboard and the case, should keep this integral part of your DIY PC build in place.

The rest of the build is more about plug-and-play. For starters, installing RAM is a piece of cake: just align your gold connectors with the center of the slot, slowly pushing down till you hear a click. It is important to make sure you’re putting the RAM in the correct slots, however. If you have dual-channel RAM, which you most likely do, it needs to be installed in the dual-channels slots on the motherboard.

Installing your GPU is also a straightforward process, except you have to open the expansion bracket at the back of your case (it’s usually held down by screws). From there, align your card’s gold connector with the motherboard’s slot and the back of the case, pressing down firmly until you hear a click.

On the flipside, installing your processor is probably the most intense part of the build. CPUs are very delicate (and expensive), so you should only really place it down in the processor socket once. Open the socket using the latch, then align the arrow that appears on your chip with the corresponding arrow on the motherboard. Gently pull the latch down, ensuring the processorhasn’t moved out of place, at all.

At this point, you should install the radiator and fans that will cool off your desktop PC. I decided to mount the CPU cooler on top of the case, with two fans providing additional cooling on the front of the case. Again, this is all according to your own budget and specifications. However, it’s best in a micro ATX tower like this one to have two fans in your radiator and another two to cool the rest of the case.

Liquid cooling is entirely possible in a DIY build, but it’s more expensive than installing fans and only necessary for overclocking or intensive processing.

With your fans in place, you can finally proceed to applying thermal paste to the top of your processor. You should apply a paper-thin layer of paste spread evenly on top of the CPU. From there, screw in the remaining screws to secure your cooler on top of the processor.

  • Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge

So now that all your PC parts are installed and fit together inside the case, it’s time to wire everything. This is a tedious and tricky process that involves knowing exactly which cables to use (your motherboard manual does a good job of explaining this).

In this build, I’m using numerous connectors for the front panel’s ports, audio inputs, and power button. This also includes power cables to the graphics card, CPU, motherboard, fan controller, individual fans, pump, and Wi-Fi antennae.

The major cables (PCI-E, 24-pin, CPU, etc.) are usually labeled and not alike at the ends visually, so there shouldn’t be too much cause for confusion there. Where you might run into some hurdles is connecting the tiny three to four pin cables that correspond with your case’s ports and fans. If you can’t tell which pins these cables should go to, your motherboard’s manual usually has a map of every port / connection on the board. From there, it should be simple.

So now you’ve nearly reached the end of your PC build. At this point, you want to make sure all your wires are installed, connections to the motherboard are secure, power supply switch is turned on and plugged into a wall outlet. Next, connect your newly built desktop to a monitor, mouse, and keyboard setup.

Finally, hit the power button. You should see a screen that bears the brand name of your motherboard. This indicates a successful Power-On Self Test (or POST, for short).

Now, plug in a USB stick with Windows 10 installation files (which you can learn about here), restart the PC, and select your boot device as the USB drive you just inserted. Follow the on-screen prompt, enter your Windows license key, and finally reach the desktop.

However, you’re still not done yet! Download and install the relevant motherboard, GPU, cooling, lighting, and networking drivers or apps that will ensure everything is running as intended. This is non-negotiable and required if you actually want your new desktop PC to run at its peak.

Congrats, you’ve just built and configured a Windows desktop.

Future upgrades

Part of the appeal for building your own desktop are the future upgrades. In this PC, there’s an 8GB Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 supplied by PNY, but if you’re sticking with current generation graphics cards and want something with a bit more oomph, buy an 11GB GeForce 1080Ti Turbo card by ASUS; it should get you the extra frames needed on an ultrawide monitor, for example.

Meanwhile, 4K gameplay and ray tracing is out of the question for current Nvidia GeForce graphics cards, but thanks to the headroom afforded to me by the 850 watt power supply, I’ll be able to just swap out these cards for an RTX 2080 once those are available.

The versatility of swapping out current parts for new(er) ones — like a faster SSD, RGB backlit fans, more Corsair RAM — is one of the best aspects of PC building. And honestly, it’s just a lot of fun.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Windows 10 includes Video Editor, a full-featured set of video creation and editing tools that tell your story with music, text, motion, and 3D effects. Video Editor is the successor to Movie Maker on Windows 10, with a focus on easy-to-use creative tools that enable you to tell your story.

Create your video

Create your new video

To create a new video that you can edit from start to finish

  1. Type video editor into the Search bar and select Video Editor to launch the app, or launch from the Start  menu.

  2. Select New video project.

  3. Name your video.

  4. Select the photos and videos you want to add to your Storyboard. You can even use Add from web to find content on Bing.

Once you have organized your Storyboard, you can change the look and feel of each photo or video clip.

  1. Select a button like Trim or Split for editing (video clips only).

  2. Select Duration to change the length of time a photo is displayed, or select multiple photos and then select Duration to change their duration all at once.

Add text

Adding text to a video

You can add Text to photos and video clips with ease. You can also create a Title Card from the Storyboard if you'd like to add text to a plain colored background. 

Simply select Text, type a title or phrase, then select a style and layout. You can also time the text to appear exactly when you want within your film.

Add music

Add music to your video

Select Background music to choose from several tracks and sync your video to the beat or select Custom audio to add and time your own music tracks, narration, or sound effects. 

Add effects

Using the power of Windows 10, you can add 3D objects or special effects to your photos and video clips. Use Filters to change your video clip or photo to black & white or other visual treatments. Select Motion to give photos more visual interest. Select Speed to speed up or slow down a video clip. If you want to change the orientation of a photo or video, just select the Rotate icon. If your photo or video is a different aspect ratio than your project, you can select the Remove or show black bars icon to zoom in and remove the letterboxing effect.

Add special effects to your video

To add 3D objects

  1. Select 3D library.

  2. Rotate and size the object and add animations as well. You can also add, move, and size 3D effects. You can also anchor an effect to a point in a video clip and watch the effect move along.

Publish your video

Publishing your video

When you have completed your project, select Finish video to publish your film. You can control video quality if you wish.

Additionally, you can Duplicate project to copy your video, and use Back up project to share your project with or save your progress to share between multiple users and devices. You can use Import backup to open one of your backed-up projects and continue working.

For a more detailed guide to Video Editor, you can check out aka.ms/videoeditoredu and let us know how you’re liking Video Editor using Send feedback

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]
Important Features


3. Final Thoughts


Today, we'll tackle the beating heart of a PC build: the motherboard and CPU. With so many choices at such a vast variety of price points, selecting the right CPU and motherboard is probably the most complicated part of any build. It also dictates everything that comes after: the kind of RAM you can use, the number of storage drives you can connect, what sort of cooler you need to invest in, and on and on.

Today, we'll tackle the beating heart of a PC build: the motherboard and CPU.

Thankfully, if you understand just a few basic details about these two components, it's pretty easy to find the right parts for your build without spending an arm and a leg on features you don't need or won't use.

Choosing a CPU

The CPU, or central processing unit, is the literal brain of your computer. Every time you type a letter on your keyboard, open a photo editing application, or slide the contrast slider in Lightroom, the CPU has to interpret that input and decide how it's going to fulfill the request.

How exactly it makes that decision is based on many different aspects of CPU architecture and design that we don't have time to get into. So for our purposes, we'll focus on the three most important questions you should ask yourself as a creator when shopping for a CPU:

  1. What are the most relevant specs?
  2. Should you go with Intel or AMD?
  3. What is overclocking and should you do it?

Classification, Clock Speed, and Cores

Knowing more is (almost) always better when making a buying decision, but you don't need to have a degree in Computer Science to pick a CPU that will meet your needs. There are really three specs that you should focus on: where your CPU fits into the Intel or AMD product line, the maximum clock speeds that it can reach, and the number of cores that it contains.

Let's take these one by one.

Classification: Generation, Family, and Tier

When building a PC, it's important that you pick a processor that was designed for the kind of work you're going to be doing, which means choosing a chip that is part of the right generation, family, and tier.

All of Intel and AMD's consumer CPUs fall into one of three broad processor families:

Intel
AMD
Family
Core
Core X
Xeon
Ryzen
Threadripper
EPYC
Target UserAmateur and EnthusiastEnthusiast to ProfessionalWorkstation and ServerAmateur to EnthusiastEnthusiast to ProfessionalWorkstation and Server

Each processor family is aimed at a different target market, and the vast majority of photo and video editors will be perfectly happy with an Intel Core or AMD Ryzen CPU. If you're a professional video editor working with super high-resolution source footage, then Intel Core X and AMD Threadripper are worth considering – since they contain more cores and PCIe lanes (more on these later), a PC with a Core X or Threadripper CPU is generally more expandable and better at tackling complex tasks like video encoding. Unless you're a professional VFX artist or you're working in 3D CAD design, you can ignore the Intel Xeon and AMD EPYC lineups entirely.

Each family is further split into different price and performance tiers. Intel's Core series is split into Core i3, Core i5, Core i7 and Core i9, while AMD's Ryzen series is split into Ryzen 3, Ryzen 5, Ryzen 7, and Ryzen 9. Similarly, Intel Core X can be had in Core i7 and Core i9 variations, while the Threadripper CPUs are split into three tiers that are embedded in the product number: 3960, 3970, and 3990.

Regardless of processor family, as the number gets higher, the performance gets better and the price increases.

Finally, each year Intel and AMD unveil the latest generation of every processor family. Intel's Core processors are up to 11th Gen (i.e. Intel Core i9-11900K), Core X is still on 10th gen (i.e. Intel Core i9-10900X) the AMD Ryzen family is up its fifth generation (i.e. Ryzen 9 5900X), and AMD's Threadripper CPUs are now on their third generation (i.e. AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X).

If you're doing run-of-the-mill photo and video editing, a mid- to top-tier Intel Core or AMD Ryzen CPU is more than powerful enough.

If you're doing run-of-the-mill photo and video editing, a mid-to-top-tier Intel Core or AMD Ryzen processor is more than powerful enough, and you can probably get away with a slightly older generation if money is tight. Newer generations are pretty much always faster, even if the current gen CPU has the exact same clock speed and core count as last year, but the jump in performance between one generation and the next isn't always huge.

For the sake of simplicity, we recommend purchasing a CPU that is one of the latest two or three generations at the most, and opting for no less than a Core i5 or Ryzen 5. For Intel, that means a 9th, 10th, and 11th Gen Core i5, Core i7, or Core i9 CPU. For AMD, that means going with a Ryzen 3000, Ryzen 4000 or Ryzen 5000 series CPU that's Ryzen 5, Ryzen 7, or Ryzen 9.

If you need the extra processing power that comes with an Intel Core X or AMD Threadripper CPU, we'd recommend sticking with the latest generation: Core X 10th gen and Threadripper 3000.

Pretty much all modern-day CPUs contain multiple "cores" that can carry out tasks in parallel, allowing the processor to multi-task more efficiently.
Source: Intel

Core Count

Most modern CPUs are split into multiple physical "cores," each of which can carry out a single operation at a time. The more cores you have the more operations you can carry out at once, making the CPU better at multitasking during heavy workloads.

Furthermore, both Intel and AMD can split each physical core into two "threads," basically doubling the amount of work the CPU can do by allowing each core to do two things at the same time: one task per thread. On Intel processors, this is called "hyper-threading" while AMD calls this same trick "Simultaneous Multithreading" or SMT.

Whatever you call it, the oversimplified point is that: the more cores and threads a processor has, the more tasks it can carry out concurrently. But there are two catches that are very important.

  1. More cores generally means a lower clock speed per core, so while you can do more at the same time, each individual core is slightly slower
  2. Not every application is tuned to take advantage of multiple cores and/or threads

This is where it pays to do a little bit of research on the applications you use most. Pretty much all photo and video editing applications are now capable of taking advantage of multiple cores and threads, but video editors will generally see the biggest boost in performance as the core count exceeds 6 or 8 cores.

For creative work, we would suggest aiming for 6 cores and above.

Clock Speed

The main spec you'll see plastered at the top of every CPU product page is the clock speed, which comes in two flavors: base clock and boost clock. Clock speed is listed as a frequency in GHz (literally: billions of cycles per second) which is directly correlated to how many "instructions" or tasks a CPU can perform every second.

The base clock speed is the guaranteed number of cycles per second that the CPU can maintain at all times, while the boost clock is a faster speed that can only be maintained for a limited amount of time given enough power and sufficient cooling to keep the CPU from overheating.

Generally speaking, the higher the "clock speed" the faster your CPU and the faster your computer. However, there are a few caveats.

As we mentioned above, more cores usually translates into a lower base clock, sacrificing raw single-core performance for multi-tasking capability. The other main caveat is that newer CPUs are able to carry out more "instructions per clock," squeezing more performance from the same exact clock speed as older generations. That's why we recommend only going back a few generations at the most when buying a CPU: any more than that and the gap in performance, even given the same basic clock speed and core count, may start to be noticeable.

Linus Tech Tips did a great explainer about this exact point recently, showing how two AMD Ryzen processors (an older Ryzen 3000 and a newer Ryzen 5000) with the exact same clock speed and core count nevertheless showed a significant difference in performance on various benchmarks.

AMD or Intel

There are some key differences between AMD and Intel processors that creators should keep in mind when shopping for a CPU.
Photo by Olivier Collet, CC0

The second (and by far more contentious) question is: AMD or Intel? In recent years, AMD has pulled ahead in terms of performance-per-watt, releasing some exceptional Ryzen and Threadripper CPUs that are more efficient and offer noticeably better multi-core performance, while Intel has generally stayed ahead in terms of single-core performance, hitting super-high boost clocks in excess of 5.0GHz on their Core i7 and Core i9 CPUs.

As we said above, this is where it pays to do a little research and find out how well your favorite photo- and video-editing applications can take advantage of multiple cores, and how many cores it can realistically tap into. Once you have an answer to that question, you can compare the price-to-performance ratio of 10th and 11th Gen Intel against equivalent Ryzen 4000 and Ryzen 5000 CPUs, and choose the option that looks like the best deal to you.

In recent years, AMD has pulled ahead in terms of performance-per-watt [...] while Intel has generally stayed ahead in terms of single-core performance.

Another major difference is expandability. Ryzen CPUs feature enough PCIe lanes to directly power a discrete Graphics Processing Unit, or GPU (16 lanes) and an M.2 SSD directly (4 lanes). Older Intel Core CPUs only featured enough PCIe lanes for the GPU, forcing users to route their NVMe SSD through the motherboard chipset, which means your SSD will compete with other peripherals for bandwidth, potentially slowing things down. The latest 11th gen Core i5, Core i7, and Core i9 addressed this by adding another four lanes to the CPU, essentially catching up to AMD.

What are PCIe Lanes?

PCIe (Peripheral Component Interconnect Express) is the type of connection or "bus" used by all modern motherboards to link your CPU to other components in your PC. This connection is split into discrete "lanes" that can each carry a certain amount of data (1GB/s per lane for PCIe 3.0, and 2GB/s per lane for PCIe 4.0), and the more expansion cards and high-speed storage you put into your PC, the more "lanes" you'll need if you want to get the full speed out of every single peripheral all the time.

Every CPU has a discrete number of PCIe lanes available – usually 16 lanes dedicated to the main x16 PCIe slot on your board and (sometimes) 4 lanes that are connected directly to one of the M.2 SSD slots. Once those 20 lanes are used up, any additional PCIe components have to be connected through the motherboard's chipset, which communicates with the CPU through another 4 dedicated lanes.

Finally, the last major consideration is Thunderbolt. If you want Thunderbolt 3 connectivity (which provides transfer speeds high enough to drive monitors and external GPUs in addition to just external storage, for example) you pretty much have to go with Intel. There are a couple of AMD-compatible motherboards with their own Thunderbolt controller built in (literally "a couple", as in two), but unless you're willing to seriously limit your options, Intel is the way to go for anyone who relies on Thunderbolt peripherals.

To overclock or not to overclock

Finally, there's the question of overclocking. Overclocking is pushing more voltage to an "unlocked" CPU to try and push it past its rated clock speed, and it's only possible if both your CPU and your motherboard support it. If you're going to overclock, you'll also need a beefier cooling solution, because pushing more voltage to your CPU means generating more heat.

Generally, we do not recommend overclocking your CPU, especially if you're building your first PC. The process itself isn't too difficult given a compatible CPU and motherboard, but it's not without risks. You risk lowering your CPU's lifespan or even bricking it if something goes horribly wrong, and even if you do everything right, you could lose the so-called "silicon lottery" and end up with a CPU that simply doesn't overclock very well.

Our recommendation? Take the extra $100 you were going to spend on a more powerful cooler and overclocking-compatible motherboard, and spend it on a slightly more powerful processor instead. Buying a more powerful processor and running it at stock is usually the wiser (if less "sexy") choice, especially given the guaranteed 'turbo boost' clock speeds that both AMD and Intel's high-end CPUs are able to reach these days.

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Choosing a motherboard

If the CPU is the brain, the motherboard is the rest of the nervous system: it connects your CPU to every other component in your PC, and it's critical that you pick a motherboard that is a) compatible with your CPU, and b) includes all of the features you need to get the most out of the parts you've purchased.

Before we dive in, here's a helpful graphic that highlights some of the most important components and connections you'll find on a modern-day motherboard:

The layout of the standard motherboard, with common components labeled. Source: Intel

We won't dive into every component, nor are they all listed above, but the most important parts are:

  • The CPU socket – where the CPU plugs into the motherboard and is locked into place
  • The M.2 Connector – where modern, high-speed M.2 NVMe solid-state storage is attached.
  • The PCIe slots – where you will connect expansion cards that need to communicate a lot of data with the CPU. This includes your GPU, high-speed network cards, video capture cards, and more. Full-width slots are known as x16 slots, but there are also x1 slots and (more rare) x4 slots that can be used with cards that don't have to send and receive as much data.
  • The RAM slots – where you will place your RAM sticks, or DIMMs. Most standard motherboards come with four slots, which are split into two channels. Smaller motherboards might only include two slots, each with its own channel.

You don't need to understand how all of the above works in order to find a motherboard that suits your creative workflow. If we boil it down to the basics, there are really three main questions you need to ask yourself:

  1. What size/form factor works best for you?
  2. Are the "socket" and "chipset" compatible with your CPU?
  3. What specs and features should you prioritize?

Choose your form factor

Three standard sizes of motherboard make up the vast majority of your options: ATX, micro-ATX, and mini-ITX. ATX is the largest at 305 x 244mm (12 x 9.6 in), micro-ATX is a little bit smaller at 244 x 244 mm (9.6 x 9.6 in), and mini-ITX is an even smaller form factor at 170 x 170mm (6.7 x 6.7 in):

The three main sizes of motherboard are ATX, Micro-ATX, and Mini-ITX. Larger boards come with more PCIe slots, a larger port selection, and other features, but they make for a bulkier build.
Source: Intel

Mini-ITX builds are all the rage these days because they're so incredibly compact, allowing you to build a powerful PC inside a very small case that can comfortably sit on top of your desk. The trade-off is that you're going to give up some expandability, it's harder to build and cable-manage inside of a compact case, and you're probably going to pay a bit more for fewer features.

You don't need to understand how all of the above works in order to find a motherboard that suits your creative workflow.

Most Mini-ITX cases come with only two RAM slots and a single x16 PCIe slot, which will probably be taken up by your graphics card. Further expansion is out of the question.

For most creatives, and especially first-time PC builders, we would recommend going with either an ATX or Micro-ATX motherboard for your rig. The improved expandability is really nice if you want to add a high-speed network card or more RAM later on, and though it requires using a larger case, it will be easier to build in, and larger motherboards are usually better suited for high-performance workflows.

Match the socket and chipset to the CPU

Once you've picked a form factor, the next thing you have to get right is picking the socket and chipset that fits your CPU. Intel and AMD CPUs use different sockets (the physical platform that your CPU plugs into on the motherboard) and each generation of CPU will only work with certain "chipsets" (the "silicon backbone" that connects your CPU to every other component in your PC).

Both of these parts are critical. There's no way to work around it if you buy a motherboard with the wrong socket or an incompatible chipset: you'll just have to buy a new one and hope that someone on eBay wants yours (or that you bought from somewhere with a great return policy).

We've created the table below to guide you in choosing a motherboard with the right socket:

CPUGenerationCompatible Socket

Intel Core
8th and 9thLGA1151
10th and 11thLGA1200
Intel Core XAll GenerationsLGA2066
AMD RyzenAll GenerationsAM4

AMD Ryzen Threadripper
1000 and 2000TR4
3000sTRX4
The "socket" is where the plugs into the motherboard. If you don't pick a compatible socket, your CPU literally won't "fit" in your PC.
Source: Intel

Picking the right chipset is a bit more complicated. Every CPU is compatible with only one socket, but most CPUs are compatible with multiple chipsets that vary in terms of both features and price. For example, the latest Intel processors are compatible with motherboards that use the Z590, H570, B560, or H510 chipsets, while the latest AMD Ryzen CPUs are compatible with motherboards that use the X570, B550, or A520 chipsets.

Generally speaking, lower letter chipsets like A- B- and H- are more affordable, with fewer features, while the Z- and X-series chipsets are aimed at power users who want the latest features, better components, and overclocking control. This is a wild oversimplification, but it should get you started as you do your research.

If you buy a motherboard with the wrong socket or an incompatible chipset, there's no way to work around it. You'll just have to buy a new one.

Start by exploring the various options on AMD and Intel's websites, pick two compatible chipsets that seem like a good fit for your needs, and then read a few reviews and comparisons online before you pull the trigger. If you want to double-check that compatibility isn't an issue, use a tool like PC Part Picker that will check the compatibility for you. Even if you don't buy from them, it's a good double-check to ensure everything is compatible before you drop $100-300 on a fancy paperweight.

PCIe 4.0, Thunderbolt, and high-speed networking

Once you've narrowed down your choices by finding a compatible socket and chipset, you'll want to take a close look at the specs to make sure that the actual branded motherboard you've landed on includes all of the features you'll need, or enough expandability to support them. This includes everything from Thunderbolt support, to high-speed networking, to sufficient I/O.

Each chipset includes a maximum number of USB ports, SATA connections, etc. that it can support, but that doesn't mean every motherboard that uses a particular chipset will include every single option. For example, the latest-and-greatest Intel Z590 chipset supports up to 37 USB ports of various types, but there isn't a single motherboard that includes all 37. That would be ... interesting.

The most important features for creatives to consider are: PCIe 4.0 support, Thunderbolt support, and high-speed networking.

If you go with an AMD Ryzen 3000 or newer or an Intel 11th generation CPU, your processor supports PCIe 4.0, which is twice as fast as the previous PCIe 3.0 standard, but you need a motherboard/chipset that supports it as well. You probably won't see a huge benefit right now, but it acts as a buffer, giving you more options in the future as more and more high-speed devices take advantage of this new standard.

Next up is Thunderbolt support. Many high-end photo and video editing peripherals are Thunderbolt only, making this a must-have for many creative pros. For now, Thunderbolt support is still limited to more expensive, high-end boards. It's also limited (almost) exclusively to Intel boards. But we're keeping our fingers crossed that the merging of Thunderbolt 4 into the USB 4.0 spec means TB4 support for a wider variety of motherboards at a wider variety of price points in the very near future.

The most important features for creatives to consider are: PCIe 4.0 support, Thunderbolt support, and high-speed networking.

Finally, high-speed networking isn't super important for the everyday user, but 2.5Gbps, 5Gbps, or even 10Gbps networking can be a huge benefit if you're a photo or video professional who wants to work directly off of network attached storage. The more common 1Gbps ports built into many modern motherboards are great if you're just backing up your work, but if you're merging massive panoramas, putting together time-lapse films, or editing high-resolution video, you'll very quickly run into a bottleneck.

If you choose the right combination of CPU and motherboard, you'll end up with a PC that's blazing fast, highly expandable and future proof.
Photo by Rafael Pol, CC0

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Final thoughts

Of all the components inside your PC, the CPU and motherboard are probably the most important and the most complicated. Believe it or not, we've only covered the bare bones minimum in this article: offering just enough information so that the first-time builder who wants a PC for photo and video editing can purchase their first CPU and motherboard with confidence.

That said, there's always more to know and learn. If you like geeking out about this stuff and want to dive deeper before you start building, check out some popular YouTube channels like Linus Tech Tips, Gamer's Nexus, and JayZTwoCents, or visit some of the great PC hardware sites out there like Tom's Hardware and PC World.

Finally, if you enjoyed this simple guide to picking a CPU and motherboard for your creator PC build, stay tuned! In part 2, we'll talk about navigating the confusing world of GPUs, RAM, and storage solutions, and how to pick a good combination of the above for creative work.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Guide to Building A PC For Video Editing

Building A PC For Video Editing

Guest Post by Denis Ogorodov

Building a PC for video editing can mean faster rendering, smoother video playback, and a more reliable workflow, but it can easily turn into an expensive over or underpowered headache if you don’t do your research. This guide is intended to help freelance editors who are interested in building their own PC workstation but might not know exactly where to begin. This guide will shed light on what each PC component does, and what hardware you should prioritize for editing.

Read about the system Denis ultimately built

Question 1: What’s Your Budget?

Start by asking yourself, “what’s my budget?” Think of your new PC as a business investment. In other words don’t ask, “how much should I spend?” instead ask “will I get a good return on this investment?” Having set up this mindset, you will have a much better idea of what you are willing to spend. A good thousand dollar monitor might sound like a luxury if you’re editing part-time, but if you are spending 12+ hours a day staring at monitors, and this monitor helps alleviate eye-strain or back pain, then $1,000 dollars for 3+ years of work doesn’t sound so unreasonable.

My advice for full time, professional editors is to consider spending around $2,500-$3,000 on a workstation. Newer editors who are working part-time, or are still in school, should aim around $1,500. You can build a very beefy PC for $1,500. If PC building is too overwhelming, or you’re on the move and don’t mind spending closer to $2,000 consider a MacBook Pro, they are some of the best laptops when it comes to video editing, no joke.

That said, if you want something that can rip through 4K R3D and Arri RAW, playback realtime while color grading footage, render and transcode footage within minutes instead of hours, things are going to get expensive, fast. Especially when it comes to dependable and fast storage solutions. Be prepared to spend $6,000-8,000 for your build, and this is not including proper reference monitors for color grading (like these) which start at around $3,000.

Flanders Scientific

Question 2: What Editing Programs Do You Use?

Next, ask yourself “What editing apps do I use?” If you are a video editor you’re probably using one of three programs: Avid, Premiere, or Final Cut Pro X. In addition, if you create visual effects or color correct then you might use: After Effects, Resolve, Nuke, Autodesk Smoke, Cinema 4D, or even Unity.

As you may know, these programs have very different hardware needs:

  • Da Vinci Resolve relies heavily on the GPU. I recommend at least a GTX 1060 - GB GPU for this app. If budget allows upgrade to a GTX 1070 or if you want to color 4K smoothly, a 1080ti would be best.
  • Compositing programs like After Effects and Nuke benefit from a lot of RAM. I recommend at least 32GB. If you’re heavily using these apps go with 64GB.
  • Transcoding programs like Compressor and Adobe Media Encoder rely heavily on your CPU. You’ll need at least an Intel 8700k or an AMD 1600x processor if you’re expecting to do a decent amount of transcoding.
  • Editing programs like Premiere, Media Composer, and FCPX, in addition to your CPU, and GPU, rely heavily on the speed of your HDDs. You’ll want at least a Samsung 850 Evo SSD for your O.S. and an external raid such as a G-Raid or, if budget allows, a Pegasus 3. If your budget is really tight you might consider a single internal HDD like one of these Barracudas. They are impressively speedy.

Barracudas Motherboard

Question 3: What kind of footage do you work with?

Understanding and predicting your needs when it comes to file formats, codecs and transcoding will help you understand how much CPU processing power, and hard drive storage you really need.

  • Do you mostly edit 30 second promos or two hour documentaries?
  • What camera formats do you mostly edit?
  • What about resolution? Are you expecting to edit in 1080p or 4k?
  • Are you also color correcting, or adding visual effects to your projects?
  • Do you plan on using a proxy workflow, and finishing your project somewhere else?

RAM memory chip

What’s inside a PC?

Let’s define some of the components of a PC that can be specified when building your own machine. Mac people, pay attention! You might not be used to this:

  • CPU (aka Central Processing Unit) - This is the computer's brain. It is responsible for running all the programs and applications on your machine, including your operating system (Windows).
  • CPU Cooler - CPUs get hot! To keep them running safely and efficiently it is important to use a heatsink and fans to keep the temperature low and stable.
  • Motherboard - If the CPU is the brain, then the motherboard is the body of the machine, it holds and connects all your comments and allows them to talk to each other.
  • RAM (aka memory) - Is your computer’s short-term memory (as opposed to your hard drive which is long term memory). It allows the computer to run multiple programs at the same time, and reduces the amount of times you have to access your slower hard drives or long-term memory.
  • Internal hard drives - These are your computer’s long-term memory. They store all of your files and data safely. When the computer is turned off this data is preserved and can be accessed again at a later date. RAM gets cleared out.
  • GPU (video card) - A video card is designed to render graphics and helps alleviate some of the computational stress off of the CPU, especially when it comes to rendering.
  • VRAM - Is the short-term memory of your GPU. The more VRAM your GPU has the more graphics you can run at the same time. Operating System - Windows, Linux, or Mac OS (hackintosh). This guide focuses on windows.
  • Peripherals - These are elements that plug into the outside of your computer like your monitor, speakers, keyboard and mouse.

Hardware Needs For Video Editors

When you look up build guides online they start with the CPU, but we’re going to start a layer deeper than that and look at the motherboard.

Motherboard Needs

When it comes to future proofing your PC, or allowing for upgradability the unsung hero is PCIe. PCIe are slots in your motherboard that allow you to customize your PC with additional hardware such as professional sound cards, additional graphics cards, MPEG render cards like the RED Rocket, 10/100Gbe Ethernet cards for NAS/Network solutions, thunderbolt expansion, SAS, NVMe SSDs, raid cards, capture cards and so much more!

What are PCIe lanes? Lanes are electric circuits that determine how much data and power can be transferred between the CPU and the components plugged into the motherboard through the motherboard’s slots (like a GPU for example). Most motherboards on the market (like this one) have fewer PCIe lanes then what I’d recommend for video editing, ranging from a total of 16-20. For video editing I recommend a motherboard and CPU combination that support a total of 40+ (like this one).

Gaming Motherboard

PCIe lanes are shared by slots on your motherboard. A slot is where hardware components are plugged into the motherboard. A motherboard usually has 4-5 slots of varying sizes, ranging from x1 to x16 lanes each (this is the length of the slot). Of course the higher the total amount of PCIe lanes supported by your motherboard and CPU, the more hardware can be installed on your machine.

For a video editor your peripherals, meaning external devices like monitors, keyboards, and editing surfaces, also might dictate what kind of motherboard you purchase for your work station. For example a colorist might want a Resolve control panel and an SDI output card, while an editor might want an audio mixer. These will each require a slightly different connector.

Black Magic Deck Link

Building a computer with a great CPU is useless to many editors if the motherboard can’t support Thunderbolt for example. With that said let’s look at what features an Editor should prioritize.

CPU Needs

Like it or not a lot of software including Adobe Premiere, doesn’t scale well with dual CPUs (not to be confused with a single CPU’s core count). With modern CPUs reaching high core counts (like the 7900x) while keeping respectable clock speeds, dual CPUs aren’t always advantageous for video editing tasks. This is true even for 4K workflows as this article explains.

Intel Xeon CPUs are often marketed to support two things: dual CPUs and ECC Memory. As we’ve mentioned Dual CPUs aren’t necessary, but what about ECC Memory? ECC Memory is short for Error Correcting Code Memory. In appearance and most functions this is the same RAM any computer uses, however ECC Memory is designed to detect and correct data corruption, really cool stuff. It sounds great on paper, but the type of errors we are dealing with only affect programs related to financial computing, or precise instruments for scientific research, not video editing. For this reason, ECC Memory is unnecessary for Video Editing, not to mention expensive. Using Xeon CPU’s severely limits your motherboard options, and consequently RAM choices. 

Intel Processors

RAM Needs

If you’re editing mostly 1080p footage promos with little to no compositing effects work you can easily work with 16GB of RAM. However, if you work on longer videos (feature length films for example), or create a lot of visual effects, I would recommend a minimum of 32GB. If you’re editing and compositing 4K footage then 32GB will be enough most of the time. If you're working exclusively with 4K or even larger frame sizes then I recommend at least 64GB of RAM.

Thunderbolt (Interface for external peripherals)

Thunderbolt is an interface that many video editors are familiar with, and very much value. Thunderbolt technology allows an editor to further increase the flexibility of your PC. Thunderbolt acts as an external PCIe extension, meaning you can plug-in heavy data reliant devices such as GPUs or a DAS system. Thunderbolt can be used for external GPU’s via a PCIe Box, fast raid systems, 5K+ monitors, and daisy chaining hard drives (a video editing friendly feature). Thunderbolt 3 is the latest iteration of the technology and supports up to 40Gbps of transfer speed, that’s a potential of 5,000 MB of data transferred per second! This bandwidth allows you to use some of the fastest external storage solutions available, and consequently smooth playback of high-resolution and high-bitrate files, such as 8K R3D RAW files.

Yet, Thunderbolt compatible motherboards are uncommon because of it’s slow adoption rate and costs. However, Thunderbolt (an Intel technology) is now royalty-free and PC hardware in 2018 and 2019 is showing signs of wide adoption. Frankly if you’re editing mostly 1080p videos then USB 3.1 will be a good enough connection. As soon as you start venturing towards an external raid system that holds terabytes of data, and 4K workflows, Thunderbolt 3 becomes a lot more attractive.

There are alternatives to Thunderbolt on both PC and Mac for connecting to a hard drive or shared storage. Many NAS devices connect via 10GBe or even 100Gbe ethernet cards. Thunderbolt is only compatible with specific Intel CPUs and no AMD CPUs (for now).

If Thunderbolt is a must, I recommend Gigabyte or Asus motherboards, specifically their x299 motherboards which both support PCIe Thunderbolt cards such as the GC-Alpine-Ridge and the Thunderbolt EX3.

Thunderbolt 3

(learn more on PC Mag).  

Hard Drives or Storage Systems Needs

Unlike other types of digital artists, editors are highly dependent on large storage volumes with redundancy, backups, and consistent transfer speeds, fast access times at a large bandwidth. Storage is something you really can’t cut corners on, and if you are, you’re shooting yourself in the foot. Video editors, transfer, copy and transcode terabytes of data, the last project I worked on had 18 Terabytes of data. Luckily now more than ever there are many storage solutions available. Storage is a giant topic, that deserves a whole post of its own but I will list below some common storage solutions.

  • Hard Disk Drives or HDDs, is your most common data storage device. They are slow, cheap and somewhat reliable. They are great for backup, transferring footage from set to post, and shipping.
  • Solid State Drives or SSDs are faster than regular HDDs but prohibitively expensive for large projects. They have significantly faster read and write speeds as such they can playback footage with a significantly higher bit rate.
  • A RAID system (Redundant Array of Independent Disks) is a data storage technology that allows you to combine multiple HDDs into one unit. This is done for both redundancy to minimize the risks of data loss but more importantly to improve read and write speeds.
  • Cloud Storage like Google Drive, and DropBox are useful for backing up project files or presets, but not for storing large files like your footage. If you need more than 1TB of data storage then the cloud might not be right for you.

Peripheral Needs

Building a PC is great but don’t forget to include all the peripherals you’ll need in the budget! Such as monitors, speakers, microphones, a keyboard and a mouse. All of these items have a huge impact on your workflow but unlike the workstation itself, are a much more personal choice.

Here are some of my own peripheral recommendations.

  • Monitor: Dell UltraSharp U2711 (289.99) or Dell UltraSharp 4k UP3216Q ($1,225.00)
  • Speakers: Audioengine A2, 2-way Powered Speaker System ($249.00 )
  • Headphones: Sennheiser HD 380 PRO ($149.95)
  • Mouse: Logitech MX Master Wireless Mouse ($83.99 )
  • Keyboard: Apple Aluminum Wired Keyboard for quite editing ($154.12).

One thing overlooked by too many freelance video editors is backup power solutions. What happens if your building’s power is interrupted? Can you imagine how much data can be lost, or worse yet corrupted? I recommend picking up a UPS.

Back-UPS: APC Back-UPS Pro 1000VA UPS Battery Backup & Surge Protector ($124.99 )

Recommended PC Builds For Video Editors

Most programs and applications have recommended minimum specs or hardware recommendations posted on their website. For example Adobe Premiere CC’s are listed here. This is a great place to start building from.

Here are my three top recommendations for building a PC:

Should You Rent A PC Instead of Buying?

Often people forget that they can rent PCs! Renting sounds expensive, but there’s three important advantages to consider:

  • You don’t have to replace obsolete hardware when the PC ages.
  • Should the PC breakdown the rental company will fix or replace it.
  • It costs less than buying it if you’re working on one, short, project.

Let’s say you’re working on a film but the director has asked you to come work on set. You may not want to buy a PC for what could be just a few days or week’s work. Many post-production houses rent PCs. Of course, a rental company probably won’t provide as deep customization as you may want, but they will undoubtedly meet your needs.

Renting a PC can also help you make up your mind about which computer exactly you'd like to build. You can rent a few different machines for a week or so and decide which you prefer. You’ll spend a couple hundred extra dollars, but you’ll be sure you got what you like.

Finally, if you need a PC for a very specific task that is expensive to set up (color correction for example because you may need expensive peripherals) there’s one other option: financing. Many PC building companies now offer financing, meaning small monthly installments over an extended period of time. In the long term you’ll definitely spend more money, however you can also gain access to an $8,000+ machine which can have a significant positive impact on your business. Other advantages of financing a PC include, customer support, extended warranties, and cheaper upgrade packages. Origin PC has a great explanation for financing its PCs.

The bottom line is if you're planning on using the machine for a long time it will ultimately be cheaper to buy it.

Origin Rent A PC

Wrap Up

The point of this guide is to give you a solid understanding of what to prioritize when building your editing workstation, regardless of if you’re building a workstation now or a year from now. Also if you read this far without scrolling through 90% of the article, congratulations, you now have the tools to make an informed and fiscally responsible decision. If you’d like to continue learning more about PCs and PC building below are links to useful online resources.

Useful Online Resources

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