Automation of binaural headphone audio calibration on an artificial head

Headphone calibration Archives

headphone calibration Archives

modificate them, delete them or create new ones. 3. Calibration. The program has a calibration files for the headphones and for the bone vibrator. Individually Calibrated Headphones Sonarworks. 7 hours ago For the ultimate accuracy, Sonarworks individual calibration is the way to go! The hardware required for the calibration of binaural headphone stimuli represented as.wav files to arbitrarily specified L e q values. headphone calibration Archives

Headphone calibration Archives - consider

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Review: Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio Edition

Article Content

Last July I posted an article called How to Improve Acoustics in Your Home Studio. In it, I described the need for a combination of absorption, diffusion, optimum speaker placement and listening position, DIY alternatives and other concerns. This is a subject every audio engineer with a home studio grapples with.

One of the main problems with home project studios is that they are rarely ideal architectural designs in terms of acoustics. So we spend time and money installing bass traps, acoustic panels and diffusers to ameliorate the interior structural flaws. Symmetry in control room design is essential to insure balanced reflections on the left and right and achieve a true stereo image. But rooms designed for living (as opposed to mixing) are never symmetrical and typically have windows, doors or closets that interfere. Then there is the problem of parallel walls and the standing waves that result.

The truth is you can only achieve so much with absorption, diffusion and speaker/listening position adjustments. When things still aren’t right, what do you do next? I suggest giving Reference 4 by Sonarworks a try.

This software has several components designed to remove the effects of your listening environment or particular headphones by applying a “Systemwide” adjustment that equalizes the output and aims for a flat response across the spectrum. It can also be used as a plugin and is available in AU, AAX Native, RTAS and VST formats.

Calibration

The set up for Systemwide headphone calibration is absurdly easy. Once installed the application is accessible from a control panel on the top menu bar (for Mac that is).

Review: Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio Edition

From there you can choose your particular headphone profile from an exhaustive list and easily A/B the effects of the software. Below are the profile and correction curves for my Sennheiser HD 280 headphones as seen in the plug-in version inserted in a Pro Tools master track.

Review: Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio Edition

Play back a professionally mastered mix through your phones, toggle the calibration and I guarantee you will be pleasantly amazed. The Systemwide and Plugin GUIs allow you to view your headphone profile as well as simulate what other listening scenarios might sound like. Without mentioning specific manufacturers, Sonarworks offers simulations such as “Japanese white cone Studio monitors” and “Popular consumer headphones” from a company founded by “a famous Dr. Rap Artist.” I assume the vague labeling is necessary because the simulations are not officially sanctioned by the manufacturers. The red curve below represents the frequency response expected from Yamaha NS-10 monitors and the green curve is the correction applied to achieve that sound through my HD 280’s.

Review: Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio Edition

You can also adjust the reference curve for Bass Boost or Tilt or add custom profiles to hear what things would sound like on consumer grade equipment. The red curve below shows a Tilt adjustment and the green is the correction curve.

Review: Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio Edition

Plugin Version vs. Systemwide

All of these operations are accessible from the plugin version as well as the standalone Systemwide application. However, the plugin has zero latency and should be inserted as the very last thing in your signal chain after the final limiter or any metering plugs. It should be bypassed before bouncing or rendering. Think of it as part of your headphones or speaker system, not the mix itself. The developers also recommend you “listen to a few reference tracks created outside your studio to get your ears used to the new sound of your headphones or speakers.”

The software adjusts for preamp level and mono monitoring settings to ensure a true A/B comparison. It defaults to a zero latency setting but can be changed to Optimum or Linear phase settings to reduce phase shift and increase precision correction at the expense of higher CPU loads.

Below are latency specifications for Systemwide vs. the Plugin Version:

Review: Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio Edition

Systemwide Latency

 

Review: Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio Edition

Plugin Latency

Tweaking Your Room

You can measure the effects of your room, speakers and listening position using the Reference 4 Measure application included with the Studio Edition and Premium Bundle (which also comes with a pair of pre-calibrated Sennheiser HD650 headphones). For this, you will need an RTA (real time analysis) omnidirectional microphone. Sonarworks sells their own version (XREF 20) which is individually calibrated for $70.

Review: Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio Edition

If you use a different mic, you could find a calibration file online (which will be model — not mic specific) or use the generic reference grade setting in the software. When testing the application I used a dbx RTA-M mic and was able to find a calibration file online to load into the software as well as view the curve.

Review: Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio Edition

Review: Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio Edition

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The software seems idiot-proof and leads you through the process with checklists and step-by-step instructions complete with diagrams and additional help screens. Through a triangulation process, the software can determine the physical dimensions of the speaker locations and listening position, which is displayed before the final measurements are taken, giving the user the opportunity to adjust the dimensions manually if needed.

Review: Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio Edition

Once things are set up, you’ll be directed to place the RTA mic in various locations as test sounds are played back and measurements are recorded. The whole process took me about 20 minutes. When completed, you simply save the correction profile in the same folder where the headphone profiles live, giving you quick access to various listening scenarios.

Review: Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio Edition

Review: Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio Edition

After measuring my system and applying the calibration to the output (which includes a set of Mackie HR824’s I’ve had for about 20 years), I played back a variety of professionally mastered tracks from different genres. The results were immediately obvious. The center became more focussed and low end was noticeably tighter.

Sonarworks offer a variety of bundles and individually calibrated headphones from Sennheiser, Focal, Sony, Beyerdynamic and Audio Technica. They even offer a calibration service where for $99, you can send them your headphones and they will return with a custom calibration curve file and a signed spec sheet detailing frequency response and harmonic distortion measurements.

There’s also a consumer version of the app, so if you’re at a coffee shop with Apple Earbuds and want to enjoy the same level of improved listening experience as Reference 4, check out True-Fi.

Conclusion

If you are at all concerned about how the sound you hear in your studio translates to other environments (and who isn’t) or if you just want a better headphone listening experience, I highly recommend giving Sonarworks Reference 4 a spin with the Free Trial. It’s well-designed software that is now an indispensable part of my work flow.

===========

Check out my other articles, reviews, interviews and my video tutorial series, Synthesis 101 — available exclusively on The Pro Audio Files.

Philip Mantione

Philip Mantione is a composer, synthesist, guitarist, educator and sound artist active in the LA experimental music scene. His music has been presented in festivals, museums and galleries worldwide. His current project is TriAngular Bent, an electroacoustic trio featuring Don Preston (founding member of Frank Zappa’s Mothers of Invention) and circuit bending virtuoso, Jeff Boynton. Details at philipmantione.com


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jaakkopasanen / AutoEq Public

TL;DR If you are here just looking to make your headphones sound better, find your headphone model in results folder's recommended headphones list and follow instructions in Usage section.

About This Project

AutoEQ is a project for equalizing headphone frequency responses automatically and it achieves this by parsing frequency response measurements and producing equalization settings which correct the headphone to a neutral sound. This project currently has over 2500 headphones covered in the results folder. See Usage for instructions how to use the results with different equalizer softwares and Results section for details about parameters and how the results were obtained.

AutoEQ is not just a collection of automatically produced headphone equalization settings but also a tool for equalizing headphones for yourself. provides methods for reading data, equalizing it to a given target response and saving the results for usage with equalizers. It's possible to use different compensation (target) curves, apply tilt for making the headphones brighter/darker and adding a bass boost. It's even possible to make one headphone sound (roughly) like another headphone. For more info about equalizing see Equalizing. If you're looking for something light weight to install as a dependency for your own project, you'll find autoeq-pkg much more suited for your needs.

Third major contribution of this project is the measurement data and compensation curves all in a numerical format except for Crinacle's raw data. Everything is stored as CSV files so they are easy to process with any programming language or even Microsoft Excel.

Sennheiser HD 800

Sennheiser HD 800 equalization results plotted

Usage

AutoEQ produces settings for basically all types of equalizer apps.

Convolution Equalizers

Convolution equalizer is the most powerful type of equalizer software. These equalizers allow extremly precise control over the frequency response and the results are the same on all devices and platforms when using the same FIR filter. Convolution equalizer is the preferred way to use AutoEq results.

AutoEq supports convolution equalizers with FIR filters as WAV files and with EqualizerAPO's GraphicEQ filter type. The default results contain FIR filters for both 44.1 kHz and 48 kHz sampling rates. Other sampling rates are supported but not given in the default results. EqualizerAPO's GraphicEQ works with any sampling rate.

To use the FIR filters, download the appropriate WAV file and import it to the EQ software of your choice. Please keep in mind that not all EQ softwares support convolution. Some equalizers can load multiple FIR filters at the same time. Download both WAV files, create a Zip file containing both and load the Zip file to for example Roon.

See EqualizerApo for instructions on how to use the GraphicEQ.

Parametric Equalizers

Parametric equalizers have filters (bands) with user adjustable gain, center frequency and quality Q. Keep in mind that parametric eq accuracy depends on the number of filters available. Usually 10 filters produce very good results but as little as 5 can be good enough. Keep in mind that different parametric equalizers will produce different outcomes with the same parameter values. Parameters produced by AutoEq are equal with EqualizerAPO using 48 kHz sampling rate. When using other equalizers or sampling rates, it's always highly recommended to check that the frequency response of the equalizer matches the parametric eq curve in the graphs.

All parametric equalizer except Peace require you to configure the filter parameters manually with the software user interface. Some parametric equalizer use filter width (band width) instead of Q. Filter width can be calculated as: where is the band width in Herts, is center frequency and is quality. Filter width in octaves can be calculated as: where is the natural logarithm. See http://www.sengpielaudio.com/calculator-bandwidth.htm for an online calculator.

It's very important to set preamp according to the value given in the result README.md document. Parametric eq filters will produce positive gains and to avoid clipping a preamp with negative gain is required.

Parametric eq settings can be used with Peace or any other parametric eq which has at least 5 bands available. Even fewer bands is possible but pre-computed results require to use minimum five first of the filters. Parametric equalizer filter parameters look like this:

TypeFcQGain
Peaking28 Hz0.466.3 dB
Peaking162 Hz0.91-2.3 dB
Peaking2237 Hz1.94-4.6 dB
Peaking6093 Hz2.26-4.7 dB
Peaking8251 Hz3.71-2.9 dB

Fixed Band Equalizers

Fixed band eq is more commonly known as graphic equalizer but in order not to confuse with EqualizerAPO GraphicEQ it is called like that in this project. Fixed band equalizer is like parametric equalizer with several peaking filters but don't have adjustable frequency information, only gain. All other types are preferred over fixed band equalizers but on some devices these are the only available ones.

Fixed band equalizers have trouble compensating for narrow notches and peaks that fall between two bands. Good example is Sennheiser HD 800 with it's 6 kHz peak that is right in between 4 kHz and 8 kHz bands of standard 10-band equalizer. When using 10-band equalizer check if the fixed band equalization curve is very different than the desired equalization curve at some frequency and adjust the nearby filters by ear for best results.

Fixed band equalizer settings look like this:

TypeFcQGain
Peaking31 Hz1.416.1 dB
Peaking62 Hz1.413.0 dB
Peaking125 Hz1.41-1.1 dB
Peaking250 Hz1.41-2.2 dB
Peaking500 Hz1.41-0.9 dB
Peaking1000 Hz1.410.1 dB
Peaking2000 Hz1.413.6 dB
Peaking4000 Hz1.41-1.0 dB
Peaking8000 Hz1.41-4.1 dB
Peaking16000 Hz1.41-7.5 dB

Windows

has EqualizerAPO, Peace and many media players with parametric equalizers such as Neutron, Roon and Foobar2000.

EqualizerAPO

It's possible to use plain EqualizerAPO and edit configuration file in . Replace contents of the file with the GraphicEQ.txt file found in results. Preamp is not needed because it is incorporated into the GraphicEQ line. Using Sennheiser HD 650 would make config file look like this:

EqualizerAPO has a graphical user interface for adjusting configurations. Launch the editor from .

equalizerapo-editor

EqualizerAPO Editor GUI

Peace

Peace is a GUI for manipulating parametric eq filters with EqualizerAPO. Peace also has visualization for the end result equalization frequency response, profile manager for multiple different eq settings and a switch for disabling everything among other features. Load eq settings into Peace by clicking Import button and select the ParametricEQ.txt file. Set the preamp to value mentioned in the results.

peace

Peace with full GUI for EqualizerAPO

Android

Android has several different equalizer options but not too many powerful apps which work with all apps. Wavelet is the best option for newer Androids (version 9 and up) but older devices have a built-in fixed band equalizer which works system wide but the center frequencies and Q values vary so might need to produce your own results.

Wavelet

Wavelet is an Android app which comes with all the AutoEq eq profiles built in. The app works with all music apps so is closest to system-wide equalizer one can have on Android without rooting. The equalizer built into this app is very powerful and can represent the AutoEq profiles very accurately. There is also an option to tune the sound with graphic equalizer. Wavelet has the best Bluetooth device compatibility of all the tested eq apps on Android.

The main functionalities of Wavelet are free (including AutoEq profiles and graphic eq) but some extra features can be unlocked with an in-app purchase.

Wavelet

Neutron

Neutron is a music player with parametric equalizer and comes with all of the AutoEq profiles built in but is not free.

USB Audio Player PRO

USB Audio Player PRO is an Android app with improved USB audio drivers for usage with USB DACs. USB Audio Player PRO is not system-wide but works with local files and many streaming services though not with Spotify. USB Audio Player has Toneboosters Morphit plugin which has parametric equalizer. This app and the plugin are not free.

Music EQ Equalizer

The best app for system wide equalization on older Android phones (without rooting) is Music Equalizer EQ which is a 10-band standard equalizer. Gains for each band can be adjusted with only 1 dB resolution but this isn't a problem because the average error is then only 0.25 dB, hardly noticeable. Bigger problem is the potential narrow peaks and notches between the bands' center frequencies since there isn't really anything that can be done for those. See notes about fixed band equalizers.

The app starts in the presets view so you need to click the left arrow in the top left corner to get to the manual view. Here you can adjust the bands. Set each band level to the closest value to what the equalization settings ask. Pre-computed results only support standard 10-band equalizers which have band center frequencies at 31, 63, 125, 250, 500, 1000, 2000, 4000, 8000 and 16000 Hz. Q values are not adjustable so you don't have to worry about those even though they are given in the result settings.

Viper4Android

Viper4Android is a system-wide convolution based equalizer (and much more) on Android but it requires rooting of the device. Viper4Android is supported with impulse response (WAV) files. For rooted users this is the best option.

JamesDSP

JamesDSP is an alternative to Viper4Android. It provides a system wide solution, has a convolution engine but requires rooting.

Linux

PulseEffects / EasyEffects

PulseEffects / EasyEffects is a Linux module with wide variety of signal processing tools including convolution and parametric equalizers.

From version 4.7.2 onwards PulseEffects added support for convolution FIR filters. This is the recommended way to apply AutoEq presets. Click the waveform button above the stereo width controls, click "Import impulse" and select the AutoEq generated WAV file. PulseEffects' convolver requires you to set the input gain to prevent clipping. The gain required by parametric eq should be sufficient, maybe 0.5 dB of negative gain more.

To use parametric eq, from version 6.0.0 onwards, first select the tab at the bottom of the screen, add the equalizer plugin, and load APO settings by clicking "Load APO Preset" and selecting the ParametricEQ.txt file. For EasyEffects <= 6.1.3, Pre-amp can be adjusted with the input slider. Later versions support reading this from ParametricEQ.txt.

From version 5.0.0 onwards, PulseEffects was renamed to EasyEffects and uses PipeWire instead of PulseAudio as backend. Load eq settings by clicking the top center cog & clicking Import ACO Presets button and select the ParametricEQ.txt file. Pre-amp can be adjusted with the input slider.

For versions prior to v4.8.0, adjust filter parameters by clicking the cog button on each filter and set type to "Bell", mode to "APO" and adjust the gain with the slider. Number of filters can be changed by clicking the screwdriver and wrench button.

pulseeffects

OSX / MacOS

System wide parametric EQ solutions on OSX typically rely on separate plugin hosting software and the actual plugin which does the actual equalization.

Pardon the lack of documentation for these. I have not tested any of the methods myself but they have been suggested by helpful AutoEQ users.

SoundSource is the easiest way to use AutoEq on Mac since it comes with all of the profiles built in. The software is however not free.

Audio plugin hosts include:

EQ plugins include:

  • Voxengo PrimeEQ is a parametric EQ plugin but is not free.
  • Fabfilter Pro Q3 is another parametric EQ plugin, more expensive than Voxengo but might be easier to install and use.
  • LAConvolver plugin is a free convolver EQ which works with impulse response WAV files.
  • AUNBandEq comes built in with Mac OSX. Works at least with HostingAU + BlackHole

hostingau+blackhole

Tutorials:

eqMac

eqMac is a Free & Open Source System Wide equalizer for macOS. eqMac has a Free 10 Band EQ and an Unlimited Band EQ (paid) with built-in AutoEQ Integration! (Expert EQ)

iOS

iOS unfortunately doesn't allow system-wide equalizers, so the only options are either music players with built-in equalizer or hardware solutions.

Neutron

Neutron is a music player with parametric equalizer and comes with all of the AutoEq profiles built in but is not free.

EQE

EQE is a system wide parametric equalizer on iOS but requires jailbreaking. Here are instructions on how to set it up: https://www.reddit.com/r/headphones/comments/dqbt81/psa_if_you_have_a_jailbroken_iphone_you_can/

Hardware

Some devices have built-in equalizers and since they do the processing in the device, they work with any source which can connect to the device.

Qudelix 5K is a portable DAC and amplifier with wired and Bluetooth connectivity and 10 band parametric equalizer.

Radsone EasStudio ES100 is a Bluetooth DAC and amp with built-in 10 band equalizer. Since this is a hardware solution it will work with practically any source.

Equalizing

is the tool used to produce the equalization results from measurement data. There is no fancy graphical user interface but instead it is used from command line.

Installing

  • Download and install Git: https://git-scm.com/downloads. When installing Git on Windows, use Windows SSL verification instead of Open SSL or you might run into problems when installing project dependencies.
  • Download and install 64-bit Python 3.8. Make sure to check Add Python 3.8 to PATH.
  • You may need to install libsndfile if you're having problems with when installing .
  • On Linux you may need to install Python dev packages
sudo apt install python3-dev python3-pip python3-venv
git clone https://github.com/jaakkopasanen/AutoEq.git
  • Create a python virtual environment
# On Windows venv\Scripts\activate.bat # On Linux and Mac. venv/bin/activate
python -m pip install -U pip
  • Install required packages
python -m pip install -U -r requirements.txt
  • Verify installation. If everything went well, you'll see the list of command line parameters AutoEq accepts.

When coming back at a later time you'll only need to activate virtual environment again

# On Windowscd AutoEq venv\Scripts\activate.bat # On Linux and Maccd AutoEq . venv/bin/activate

To learn more about virtual environments, read Python' venv documentation.

Updating

AutoEq is in active development and gets new measurements, results and features all the time. You can get the latest version from git

Dependencies may change from time to time, you can update to the latest with

python -m pip install -U -r requirements.txt

Command Line Arguments

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Cockos Incorporated Forums > REAPER Forums > REAPER Q&A, Tips, Tricks and Howto > Is Sonarworks really accurate?


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View Full Version : Is Sonarworks really accurate?


Mr. PC

01-04-2018, 12:03 PM

So I've been thinking of "EQing my headphones" to get a flat output.

Looking at a couple curves of other peoples measurements (InnerFiedlity the Headphone Guru and Sonarworks the pro headphones calibrators; people who can definitely do this better than me.)

https://medias.audiofanzine.com/images/normal/1572472.png

https://www.innerfidelity.com/images/Oppo_PM3_Graph_PM3HarmanCompensation.jpg

But there seems to be such a big discrepancy between the curves. Sonarworks claims to be accurate to 3dB with their general calibration curves; meaning that the headphones shouldn't vary more than 3dB from model to model.


Photoshoping the 2 pics to the same scale,

http://oi68.tinypic.com/29fxjy1.jpg

They look a little better, but looking at the similarities, only a little boost from 100Hz-200Hz, and a little dip from 300Hz-400Hz

Above 2k the charts seem to be more different than similar, so either

1 - Sonarworks is not very useful
2 - Innerfidelity has bad measurements.

Am I missing something?


Dannii

01-04-2018, 02:38 PM

I was initially skeptical of Sonarworks but I decided to bite the bullet and try the demo of the full suite last month during their sale.

I'm no stranger to calibration techniques and had previously done my own measurements and calibrations of my studio monitors and was well pleased with the results. It was a big step up from no processing. That's part of the reason I was reluctant to try Sonarworks. I figured it wouldn't really offer much over what I'd already accomplished.

I was wrong! Very wrong! After running the Sonarworks demo, I was quite simply shocked at how well it works. It was the same step above my own calibration as that calibration was over uncalibrated. I purchased the full Reference 4 Studio Edition within MINUTES of setting up the demo!

It is now an essential part of my monitoring chain.


As for the headphone calibration, I recently purchased a pair of Beyerdynamic DT1990 Pro headphones and absolutely love them!
I noticed that there is a calibration setup for that model in Sonarworks so I decided to try it out.
At first, I didn't like it. The whole EQ curve seemed to tilt everything in the direction of more lows and less highs and I thought it sounded dull by comparison. However, I did some objective analysis and compared the Sonarworks calibration of the 1990s with the calibrated sound of my studio monitors and they are remarkably close. I decided to leave the Sonarworks calibration in my headphone monitoring chain and now I love what it does. It actually sounds very accurate and my mixes are translating well everywhere.

So, in summary, I'm a now a Sonarworks convert. It works extremely well.


vanhaze

01-04-2018, 02:54 PM

Hi ReaDave, many thx for this valuable info !

I never heard of Sonarworks, now i am interested ..!

I checked out their website for this product:
https://store.sonarworks.com/collections/frontpage/products/reference-4-headphone-edition.

I use my Sennheiser HD650 headphones alot at home, to mix in Reaper.
Do you know how i can find out if this headphone is supported by Reference4 - Headphone Edition ?

Warm Regards !


JHughes

01-04-2018, 03:24 PM

The Sonarworks Headphone EQ for my HD600s sounded phasey to me, I couldn't take it. I don't want my monitoring chain to blur focus.


vanhaze

01-04-2018, 03:25 PM

Mmmm.. that sounds not good.. thx for the info !


JHughes

01-04-2018, 03:27 PM

NP, something to pay attention to during the demo period anyway. What I heard doesn't seem to bother many.


vanhaze

01-04-2018, 03:34 PM

- Good to know i can run first a demo version, so i can try it out.
- Ahum, but i consider myself as a good longstanding soundengineer with excellent hearing for detail, so i am assuming i would hear the same phasey/washy issue as you describe.

Let's find out. :)


JHughes

01-04-2018, 03:37 PM

I'm curious to read your results. :)


vanhaze

01-04-2018, 03:37 PM

I'll keep ya posted, for sure !


vanhaze

01-04-2018, 04:05 PM

Ok, so installed the demo.
Put Reference 4 Headphones plugin in Reaper's Monitor Chain.
A volume drop of about 6db so i had to compensate that with a gain plugin to level match it as good as possible when doing AB test.

Honestly i did AB for a minute or so and can't hear that much of a difference ..
I don't really experience a phasey/washy sound when Reference 4 is enabled.
With the plugin enabled, the sound seems abit less "busy" , as if details come alittle bit more to the front.
Hard to tell really, maybe my Sennheiser headphone is quite natural/accurate by itself already ..


JHughes

01-04-2018, 05:42 PM

Thanks for your report.

I must clarify though, when I say phasey, I don't mean phasing, so it's not like I heard any movement in the sound LOL. I just mean that the placement of instruments in the stereo field seemed a little less solid.

I forget if the software lets you choose between different EQ types, I seem to remember linear phase was used. I'll try again some day though.


Mr. PC

01-05-2018, 10:14 PM

The Senn 600s and 650s are supposed to be pretty accurate, so that could be it.


Also, there should be no phase issues places on the master track. Linear phase could add some pre-ring, but using it at minimum phase really shouldn't make any difference; it's just an EQ curve, right?


Dannii

01-06-2018, 03:46 AM

It is possible that if the response at the mix position is not compensated correctly for each channel that the image could end up smeared.
In my case though, Sonarworks fixed some minor imaging problems I had. My room is reasonably symmetrical but the roof is slightly lower on the right hand side. I also have different objects on each side of my mix position that slightly affect the response due to the very minor reflections they present.
One of the improvements Sonarworks made here was to compensate correctly for those differences. The resultant EQ curves are actually slightly different between channels which is exactly what I'd expect.


JHughes

01-06-2018, 07:29 AM

The Senn 600s and 650s are supposed to be pretty accurate, so that could be it.


Also, there should be no phase issues places on the master track. Linear phase could add some pre-ring, but using it at minimum phase really shouldn't make any difference; it's just an EQ curve, right?Well, any EQ will change phase somehow, that's why you might use say a Baxendall in one place and a linear phase somewhere else.

If I had used the app on speakers rather than headphones maybe I wouldn't be able to hear the diff.

Also the most important thing is mix translation and that I did not test, whereas I'm sure Dave has.


Mr. PC

01-06-2018, 09:02 AM

It is possible that if the response at the mix position is not compensated correctly for each channel that the image could end up smeared.
In my case though, Sonarworks fixed some minor imaging problems I had. My room is reasonably symmetrical but the roof is slightly lower on the right hand side. I also have different objects on each side of my mix position that slightly affect the response due to the very minor reflections they present.
One of the improvements Sonarworks made here was to compensate correctly for those differences. The resultant EQ curves are actually slightly different between channels which is exactly what I'd expect.

Oh, I didn't realize Sonarworks processed each channel separate. Is that true of the headphone plugin as well?

In this case linear phase I guess would be the best option. I would do a 'with' and 'without' Sonarworks monitor.


RedStone

01-06-2018, 09:44 AM

I've been using reference 3 (and now 4) for about a year now. I did notice what I think is a bit of crossfeed, which is where I think the reduction in width is coming from. This would be normal for listening on speakers, so I don't view it as a bad thing.

Listening in Mono is where you can really hear the difference. My Beyerdynamic cans have a horrible boost at 10khz. I can't listen to them for very long now without calibration enabled since I've noticed that boost.

The calibration for headphones won't be 100% accurate, as each set of headphones (Even of the same make) can be slightly different due to slight manufacturing inconsistencies. Plus there seems to be a breaking-in period for speakers and headphones, so response curves will change somewhat over time. I'm not sure if any of that is enough to worry about or not. I find the stock curves "good enough" when combined with some good cans as well as a calibrated speaker system in a calibrated room for reference.

I use reference in linear phase mode to avoid any phase problems, and I also use the 'avoid clipping' option since the plugin may be boosting some frequency ranges quite a bit in order to achieve a flat response (or a flatter response as the case may be). When A/Bing, I just turn off calibration from within the plugin, and the signal is allowed to pass through uncalibrated.

If you want to do a truer bypass, try using something like AB_LM so the before and after are precisely the same volume.


RedStone

01-06-2018, 09:51 AM

To split the hairs a little more, to achieve a truly "flat" response you would also need to know the response curve of your ears. So ... imho there are no attainable absolutes here except for:


take care of your ears by not listening for long periods at decibels SPL above 85. This includes on speakers or cans.
Find the sweet spot between what you've got now and significantly improved.
Chasing perfection is a fool's errand. Keep building on what you've got, and keep moving forward. Eventually you'll look back and realize you've come a really long way!
Physics always wins. Lack of knowledge about the physics of sound is a barrier to progress.


Most headphones at max volume have an SPL rating of over 110dB. This will begin to kill your ears ... in minutes! I did some testing on my macbook and found that at max volume, my sony headphones pump out 117DbSPL. That gives me about 30 seconds before damage occurs to my hearing. Keeping my Macbook volume at 1 'tick' below half way is the sweet spot for longer term listening (even then, it only gives me 2 hours max per day before damage sets in).

Continuous exposures at and above 85dB SPL are considered hazardous by the CDC. And for every 3db SPL of change, that time gets either cut in half or doubled. So at 88dB, you get 4hours. At 91dB, you get 2 hours. at 94dB, 1 hr etc before damage can occur. Running most headphones even at 3/4 max volume will damage your hearing in less than 1 hour. Then that really screws up the search for "flat monitoring"


Dannii

01-06-2018, 01:39 PM

I should add that I'm also using Sonarworks in linear phase mode except for when playing VST instruments (when I need the lowest latency).

Oh, I didn't realize Sonarworks processed each channel separate. Is that true of the headphone plugin as well?

In this case linear phase I guess would be the best option. I would do a 'with' and 'without' Sonarworks monitor.

Headphones should have the same EQ on both channels because they are not affected by the room. Speaker calibration does each speaker individually to improve channel balance and imaging due to room influence.


Dannii

01-06-2018, 01:45 PM

Also the most important thing is mix translation and that I did not test, whereas I'm sure Dave has.

Absolutely. This is a game changer in that regard too for me. I'm actually listening to my DT1990s through Sonarworks right now as I type this.
I've been A/Bing monitors vs headphones with Sonarworks on both and they are VERY close here which is a very good thing.

I've also set up an Ambisonic headphone decode chain using Blue Ripple, ATK and Sonarworks and I can get a reasonable 3D sound field happening with headphones which I'm quite happy about.


ericzang

01-09-2018, 05:55 AM

I've also set up an Ambisonic headphone decode chain using Blue Ripple, ATK and Sonarworks and I can get a reasonable 3D sound field happening with headphones which I'm quite happy about.

Are you referring to what you describe in your thread (in your signature)? ReaDave Headphone Monitoring FX Chain and Track Template

Or something in addition to that? Sounds interesting!


metal_priest

01-09-2018, 06:18 AM

i'm trying the demo in these days too (as I just moved to a new house and i'm setting up my studio..building some bass trap and schroeder diffusor...take about this in another future topic if i will remember to take pics, it might be helpful for other people).

I'm impressed too about this software, and i'm wondering to buy it when the demo will be espired.

I make a very extreme test on my un-treated room, just the desk, some shells full of books nothing else...really extreme.
And, what the f**k?
I couldn't believe to my ears..of course nothing good to work with because the acoustic is too much bad right now, but i could work on a couple of minor jobs without that annoying boomy sound...if it was way better with this extreme situation, I really guess that once i'll be done with the treatment work it will be part of my monitoring chain for sure.

I didn't try with my MDR7506, i will let you know


Dannii

01-14-2018, 12:35 PM

Are you referring to what you describe in your thread (in your signature)? ReaDave Headphone Monitoring FX Chain and Track Template

Or something in addition to that? Sounds interesting!

The version I am using which includes Sonarworks and Blue Ripple is a variation on the templates in that topic.


So I see some of you have used the demo to check your speakers and room out. Certainly they don't include a an acoustic measuring microphone with the demo, so how did you folks do this, with your own mics.

I've already got a good mic and don't want to purchase another. :)


Dannii

01-14-2018, 01:14 PM

So I see some of you have used the demo to check your speakers and room out. Certainly they don't include a an acoustic measuring microphone with the demo, so how did you folks do this, with your own mics.

I've already got a good mic and don't want to purchase another. :)

I purchased this without the measurement mic. You can use any decent measurement mic with it and it allows you to import calibration files for your existing mic.
I used my Behri ECM8000 with its calibration file and it worked really well.


Stella645

01-14-2018, 01:21 PM

I bought a cheap used ECM8000 to demo it, then bought the Sonarworks mic with individual calibration after being impressed by the demo and sold the EMC for the same price I paid for it losing just a few quid on postage.

only an omnidirectional measurment mic will work.


I purchased this without the measurement mic. You can use any decent measurement mic with it and it allows you to import calibration files for your existing mic.
I used my Behri ECM8000 with its calibration file and it worked really well.

Thanks Dave and Yeah, I've got the same mic. May I ask what you paid for Sonarworks?


Dannii

01-14-2018, 01:37 PM

Thanks Dave and Yeah, I've got the same mic. May I ask what you paid for Sonarworks?

I got it at the end of last year during their half price sale.
Regarding the ECM8000, that is one of Behringer's early successes. I've had mine for around fifteen years and it has proven itself to be a great reference mic many times over in that period. Honestly, that mic is just as good as many others costing significantly more, especially when used with its calibration file.


Dannii

01-14-2018, 01:41 PM

Thanks Dave and Yeah, I've got the same mic. May I ask what you paid for Sonarworks?

I forgot to mention that there are two reasons I didn't purchase their reference mic. One is that I doubt the results would be much different to the ECM and two is that if I purchased Sonarworks with the mic, I had no option to pay in US$. I could only pay in Euros and that made the overall price much higher. The Aussie to US dollar is MUCH better than Aussie dollar to Euros. I don't like the Euro very much!


Okay thanks Dave, I think I've seen the price for Sonarworks at about $250, maybe if I could get it for half I would be interested. :)

Yeah, I've had my ECM8000 for a little over a year, I've only used it twice, once to calibrate my control room and once just playing around experimenting with Reaper's monitor FX.

I checked all the various acoustic mics out there at the time I bought it and decided that regardless of the price it was plenty good enough. :)


Stella645

01-14-2018, 02:49 PM

They rejigged the way they sell it.
Now if you want speaker calibration you have to buy the complete bundle with headphones and systemwide.

Currently $211 once in your cart at AudioDeluxe.

If you hold out for a sale maybe it will be less but I suspect no more half price sales as the bundle is already cheaper than the individual software would have been.....always check a third party site as they usually honour the sale price and add their own extra discounts on top.


They rejigged the way they sell it.
Now if you want speaker calibration you have to buy the complete bundle with headphones and systemwide.

Currently $211 once in your cart at AudioDeluxe.

If you hold out for a sale maybe it will be less but I suspect no more half price sales as the bundle is already cheaper than the individual software would have been.....always check a third party site as they usually honour the sale price and add their own extra discounts on top.

Okay, thanks Stella, whats the deal with the demo, do they give you a certain amount of time, or is there another way they apply it.

I'm thinking I wouldn't want to demo it with out having enough time to do it in one shot. Or do they have a way of dealing with is so that you have plenty of time to see if it works?


Dannii

01-15-2018, 12:53 AM

Okay, thanks Stella, whats the deal with the demo, do they give you a certain amount of time, or is there another way they apply it.

I'm thinking I wouldn't want to demo it with out having enough time to do it in one shot. Or do they have a way of dealing with is so that you have plenty of time to see if it works?

Demo is 21 days. It took me about 21 minutes to decide to make the purchase though!!!
https://www.sonarworks.com/reference/downloads


Geoff Waddington

01-15-2018, 02:53 AM

Yup, love the ECM8000, had one for about 10 ears, might be the best thing Behringer makes :)

As far as using linear phase EQ for compensation in order to avoid phase problems, be careful.

You could actually be CAUSING phase problems by using a linear phase EQ.

A single loudspeaker, a single diaphragm headphone earpiece for instance, is a "minimum phase" device.

This has a rigorous engineering definition.

But what's really important is that as you correct a minimum phase device amplitude response, you ALSO correct the phase response, they are mathematically and sonically linked.

Minimum phase device has an evil twin called "excessive phase".

Excessive phase is commonly found in things like 2 way (or more) loudspeakers, rooms, etc.

Excessve phase has an electronic equivalent, an all pass filter.

Correcting the excessive phase component response is trickier.

As a VERY rough rule of thumb, in room acoustics the peaks tend to be minimum phase, the dips tend to be excessive phase.


Demo is 21 days. It took me about 21 minutes to decide to make the purchase though!!!
https://www.sonarworks.com/reference/downloads

Okay, thanks again Dave, how did you get the profile for your ECM8000, my mic doesn't have a profile code, at least not one I can see? :)


Stella645

01-15-2018, 11:07 AM

The ECM don't come with a calibration but there is some generic calibration data available from various sources online and you can make your own file by pasting this into a text file and removing one of the columns.

https://sonarworks.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/articles/207211709-Can-I-use-my-own-microphone-calibration-file-

Note I have seen someone who had their mic professionally calibrated say that the generic data was nothing like their data, so it may or may not be an improvement over using it without.


The ECM don't come with a calibration but there is some generic calibration data available from various sources online and you can make your own file by pasting this into a text file and removing one of the columns.

https://sonarworks.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/articles/207211709-Can-I-use-my-own-microphone-calibration-file-

Note I have seen someone who had their mic professionally calibrated say that the generic data was nothing like their data, so it may or may not be an improvement over using it without.

Thanks again Stella, but I'm a little confused. They say this:

Open up this file with any text editor and remove anything that is not the values for Frequency Response and Magnitude.

But there is no file? Heh heh, oh well, as you indicate, it might not matter.


cyrano

01-15-2018, 11:36 AM

The .cal file Behringer offers is for a first generation ECM8000. That's the one with the Panasonic WM61a clone capsule produced in the Philippines. There are at least four other OEM's who have produced this mic for Behringer.


Stella645

01-15-2018, 12:33 PM

Thanks again Stella, but I'm a little confused. They say this:

But there is no file? Heh heh, oh well, as you indicate, it might not matter.

The file is at Behringer site...but yeah, I don't think you can necessarily assume it will make things any better. this uncertainty was why I ended up just buying the Sonarowrks mic which has been individually calibrated by them.

https://music-group.force.com/musickb/view/article/behringer/Microphone-Where-Can-I-Download-The-ECM8000-Calibration-Data


The file is at Behringer site...but yeah, I don't think you can necessarily assume it will make things any better. this uncertainty was why I ended up just buying the Sonarowrks mic which has been individually calibrated by them.

https://music-group.force.com/musickb/view/article/behringer/Microphone-Where-Can-I-Download-The-ECM8000-Calibration-Data

Okay thanks Stella, I created a text file that should work, it's based on the link you provided. If anybody else wants it you can DL it here.

https://stash.reaper.fm/32700/ECM%208000%20Calibration.txt


Dannii

01-16-2018, 08:04 PM

The .cal file Behringer offers is for a first generation ECM8000. That's the one with the Panasonic WM61a clone capsule produced in the Philippines. There are at least four other OEM's who have produced this mic for Behringer.

I didn't know they used capsules with the same specs as the WM61a. My ECM is one of the early production runs that the cal file was written for.
I have a bunch of WM61a capsules here which I'm using to build custom PZM's. Their response isn't the same as the ECM8000 file suggests. Perhaps the clones Behri used have a different response to the Panasonic capsules.


Triode

02-21-2019, 05:52 PM

Hi Folks

I'm just trying Sonarworks out with my monitors.
When the Sonarworks plugin is used in the monitor FX chain in reaper it doesn't function (there's no level showing in the plugin metering). When I put it on the master bus it works. Have any of you got it working in the monitor FX chain and was there a trick to that?

Cheers


Hi Folks

I'm just trying Sonarworks out with my monitors.
When the Sonarworks plugin is used in the monitor FX chain in reaper it doesn't function (there's no level showing in the plugin metering). When I put it on the master bus it works. Have any of you got it working in the monitor FX chain and was there a trick to that?

Cheers

Hi Triode, yes I do have it in my "Monitor" FX, it's working very nicely. I've also got it working well outside of Reaper using "Systemwide", another Sonarworks plugin.

It's been a while so I don't recall the exact procedures.


Triode

02-22-2019, 02:20 AM

Thanks Tod.

It was the pin thing. My interface outs are number 17 and 18. I needed to open the pin dialog and click on the plus sign and add the relevant pins. Stumped me before and I forgot it was necessary for every plugin there.

I set Sonarworks up last night using a U87 and even though I imported a general calibration file I'm not sold yet listening to various frequencies on an oscillator. I think the mic that comes with the software might be necessary. Hmmn...


RedStone

02-22-2019, 03:53 PM

Yes you need to use a proper calibration microphone with a calibration file to set up sonarworks for using it for monitoring with speakers.


I set Sonarworks up last night using a U87 and even though I imported a general calibration file I'm not sold yet listening to various frequencies on an oscillator. I think the mic that comes with the software might be necessary. Hmmn...

I've got a Behringer ECM8000 acoustic measurement microphone. I got it at Sweetwater, I see they're about $60 right now. I've noticed quite a few other people have it and I think it's okay for this.

I also see the Sonarworks microphone is about $70 right now.

I think there's a calibration file out there for the ECM5000, but I measured without it and got reasonable results.


Stella645

02-23-2019, 11:47 AM

I think there's a calibration file out there for the ECM5000, but I measured without it and got reasonable results.

Well it's not so much out there as right here ....you posted yours last year after being pointed at the data! It's just a bit further up the thread.
The problems with it are also discussed.


Well it's not so much out there as right here ....you posted yours last year after being pointed at the data! It's just a bit further up the thread.
The problems with it are also discussed.

Thanks Stella, yeah but I wonder if there isn't something more recent?


Dannii

02-24-2019, 04:24 AM

The cal file I used for my ECM800 is the one linked to earlier in this thread. It works perfectly here.


Stella645

02-24-2019, 05:46 AM

Thanks Stella, yeah but I wonder if there isn't something more recent?

The data you created it from has not been updated since 2016 so I guess still considered current by Behringer.

https://kb.musictribe.com/musickb/view/article/behringer/en_US/Microphone-Where-Can-I-Download-The-ECM8000-Calibration-Data

However....this statement pretty much sums up my own concerns and the reason I went for the xref20 in the end.

http://www.cross-spectrum.com/measurement/calibrated_behringer.html


However....this statement pretty much sums up my own concerns and the reason I went for the xref20 in the end.

http://www.cross-spectrum.com/measurement/calibrated_behringer.html

Aah, I hadn't seen that before, it looks like that was published in 2013.

When I got mine I went over it pretty thoroughly with Sweetwater regarding how well they worked. I'm sure they were tempted to sell me a more expensive mic, but when I pressed them, they assured me the ECM5000 would do the job.

The only problem I've had is the mic clip broke, but I've got a lot of assorted mic clips, so it's no problem.


dub3000

02-24-2019, 01:01 PM

Just a note to say that I also use Sonarworks in a room with a fair bit of treatment (full-height traps, diffusers) and it made a great, measurable difference.

Only complaint is something I have already requested as a feature - the tray icon needs to indicate if it is in speaker or headphone mode. A few times I've been wondering why everything sounds awful before realising I have headphone correction mode on while monitoring through speakers. But otherwise, it's great.


Dannii

02-24-2019, 05:28 PM

However....this statement pretty much sums up my own concerns and the reason I went for the xref20 in the end.

http://www.cross-spectrum.com/measurement/calibrated_behringer.html

Hmm.. Very interesting. It seems the ECM8000 is somewhat of an anomaly for Behringer. As a general rule, their quality has improved by leaps and bounds of recent years. However, the early ECM8000 mics have proven to be very reliable. If the new ones are not up to par, that goes against the grain for Behringer.
As far as I can tell, my ECM8000 still works as good as the day I got it back at the start of the 2000s.


cyrano

02-25-2019, 05:12 AM

I'm afraid it's true, Dave.

The first generation ECM8000 had WM61a capsules and a transformer.

The second generation ECM8000 had WM61a capsules and no transformer.

The third generation ECM8000 had clone capsules, made in the Philippines.

The fourth generation ECM8000 had clone capsules, made in the Philippines and an SMD board.

Apparently, there's a fifth generation now. And problems with consistent electret quality.

Besides, there's a design error in all of them. It's not a balanced mic, because of a wiring error. Correcting that yields a 6 dB higher signal output.

Atm, look at the Mini-DSP UMIK-1:

https://www.minidsp.com/products/acoustic-measurement/umik-1

And, yes, it's a USB mic. BUT it's individually calibrated! and it's only 75$.


Dannii

02-25-2019, 05:20 AM

Thanks Cyrano. You learn something every day so they say.
I'll have to open mine up and check out which version it is. I'm going to guess it is a WM61a model without transformer. It came with the Ultracurve 8024 which I mostly use as a spectrum analyzer these days.


cyrano

02-25-2019, 05:13 PM

Seems like a good guess, Dave. I never could lay my greasy hands on one of the transformer ones. Seems these are rare. I do have one of all the other generations. Only one used for acoustic measurement. The others are noise pickups, used for testing cabling and shielding. Gostbusters... :D


karbomusic

02-25-2019, 06:10 PM

I'm going to guess it is a WM61a model without transformer.

I just cracked one of mine open (I have 2), they are circa 2002 and no transformer so I wonder when they had transformers. Reg panasonic capsules, it looks like WM6x but not exactly so not sure if they ever actually had these. I may take the capsule out to look closer but it is glued in; I'd be tempted to say its a WM6x knockoff. Nice enclosures though, I really should take a couple of those WM61a's we bought in 2014, build new preamps and just rebuild both of them and rebrand as "the karbo". :D


cyrano

02-25-2019, 06:57 PM

Getting the capsule out unharmed is next to impossible...

And here's a pic of the transformer one:

http://goedgeluid.be/IMG/jpg/ECM8000_board_old_trafo.jpg


Getting the capsule out unharmed is next to impossible...

And here's a pic of the transformer one:

http://goedgeluid.be/IMG/jpg/ECM8000_board_old_trafo.jpg

That's got a totally different looking case, were they that different back then?

I'm totally stuck with mine unless I want to buy another one, but I'm happy with what I ended up with for my room using Sonarworks.

I only shot the room once with Sonarworks, so when I have some time I'm going to do it again to see what happens. :)


karbomusic

02-25-2019, 07:36 PM

Getting the capsule out unharmed is next to impossible...

And here's a pic of the transformer one:



Thanks for the pic. I got it out without much issue. It's bigger than the WM61a. ECM800 on the right...

https://imgur.com/RjLWDW5.png

The pre...

https://imgur.com/Tame8Lr.png


cyrano

02-25-2019, 07:39 PM

That's got a totally different looking case, were they that different back then?

I'm totally stuck with mine unless I want to buy another one, but I'm happy with what I ended up with for my room using Sonarworks.

I only shot the room once with Sonarworks, so when I have some time I'm going to do it again to see what happens. :)

I only can see a different screw...

Mine aren't all the same either. But the differences are minor. Different grille, different screws, XLR's.

Behringer used different OEM's over time for these. The only one I'm sure of, is Phonic, in Taiwan. One of my broken ECM8000's states "Made in the Phillipines".

The latest one (since 2015) seems to use the same OEM as the Dayton measurement mic. It's 200 Ohms, the older ones all are 600 Ohms.


cyrano

02-25-2019, 07:52 PM

Thanks for the pic. I got it out without much issue. It's bigger than the WM61a. ECM800 on the right...

Well, congrats! I never managed to get one out without heating it.

Since yours still has through-hole components, it's one of the earlier. 3rd generation in my list?

And even WM61's aren't too sure. They're still available from reputed sources, but a lot of "fake" ones are around. Maybe even Panasonic made several revisions?

But my list is based on what I've seen. Probably there have been other ECM8000 versions in other markets, or at other moments. These four are the ones I've seen over the years and by dissecting the defective ones I've been given.

The info about the latest one (2015) comes from a GS thread:

https://www.gearslutz.com/board/so-much-gear-so-little-time/1023066-behringer-ecm8000-specs-changed-why.html


karbomusic

02-25-2019, 08:03 PM

Well, congrats! I never managed to get one out without heating it.


Very judicious use of acetone on a Q-Tip.


cyrano

02-26-2019, 04:17 AM

Very judicious use of acetone on a Q-Tip.

Never tried that. Doesn't acetone damage the capsule?

I mean, acetone vapor is enough to make 3D prints shiny, isn't it?


karbomusic

02-26-2019, 04:21 AM

Never tried that. Doesn't acetone damage the capsule?

I mean, acetone vapor is enough to make 3D prints shiny, isn't it?

It should be OK unless made of something like ABS but I was careful not to soak the element side. I'll test when I put it back in to make sure it still works.


akademie

02-26-2019, 05:46 AM

Any way to determine "version" of Behringer ECM8000 microphone without disassembling/breaking it...?
For which of them will the supplied calibration data work?

I have two ECM-8000 that I want to use to measure my room. They were bought second hand at different times. One of them has CHINA inside the XLR connector, the another one does not :)


cyrano

02-26-2019, 09:05 AM

Any way to determine "version" of Behringer ECM8000 microphone without disassembling/breaking it...?

Nope. AFAIK there's no way. Too many different versions.

For which of them will the supplied calibration data work?

The .cal file is generic. It doesn't apply much calibration, except in the low end.

As these are electret capsules, getting older will probably yield more difference than the individual versions. All the capsules in these are omni and reasonably flat.

And as long as your measurements are relative to other measurements you make with the same mic, it doesn't matter that much.

I have two ECM-8000 that I want to use to measure my room. They were bought second hand at different times. One of them has CHINA inside the XLR connector, the another one does not :)

If you start hearing a lot of hiss, they are ripe for replacement.


akademie

02-26-2019, 09:28 AM

Thanks cyrano,
will do some measurement in spare time and compare those two mics to see what's up.


I ran into this problem of latency and I couldn't figure out why.

I had a client in for the last few days, and every time he tried to play his guitar or sing, there was way to much
latency so I had to use direct monitoring. I just didn't have time to stop and figure out what the problem was.

Then today I got to thinking maybe it's the Sonarworks plugin in the monitor FX, and sure enough, when I turned it
off today the latency went away. Ha ha, I can't believe I didn't figure that out sooner. So I decided to see if
I could set up ReaEQ to mimic Sonarworks.

I set up the tracks and FX like this.

Trk-1: JS White Noise generator (White Noise has less distortion then Pink Noise)
Trk-2: Sonarworks
Trk-3: 2 ReaEQ plugins
Trk-4: Span

Trk-1 is routed to both Trk-2 & Trk-3 while Trk-2 & Trk-3 are rounted to Trk-4.
Trk-2 is sending both left & right to Trk-4.
Trk-3 one ReaEQ goes out left using Pin-1, while the other ReaEQ goes out right using Pin-2.

Span is setup for both Trk-2 & Trk-3, with (Range Lo = -40)(Range Hi = -26)(Slope = 0) and a Smoothing of 1/6 Oct.

First I panned Trk-1 full left and setup the left ReaEQ, then panned Trk-1 full right and setup the right ReaEQ.

When I got done, I grouped the "Mutes" on both Trk2 & Trk3, loaded a reference song and routed it to both Trk-2 & Trk3.

While playing the reference I flipped back and forth between Sonarworks and ReaEQ. They sounded very very similar, ReaEQ
had slightly more in the mid range and Sonarworks had slightly more in the low end.

However, Sonarworks sounded somewhat tight in a way that I could both feel it and hear it. After testing for quite awhile
using other reference songs, I decided I definitely like ReaEQ better. Also I added another stereo ReaEQ and added about
0.8dB of Low Shelving at 116hz to make up for the lower bottom end.

So I added my ReaEQs to the monitor mix and bypassed Sonarworks. I'm really liking it and the latency is gone. :)


Triode

03-02-2019, 01:34 PM

Sonarworks does have a zero latency mode. Did you try that too?


Sonarworks does have a zero latency mode. Did you try that too?

Yeah I know, but somewhere I read that Linear Phase was better so that's where I set it and forgot about it.

So to be honest, I did forget about that, so thanks Triode. But I still think I like the ReaEQ better. Ha ha, maybe there was a reason I forgot about the Zero Latency thingy. :)


acintya

06-07-2019, 07:22 AM

I was initially skeptical of Sonarworks but I decided to bite the bullet and try the demo of the full suite last month during their sale.

I'm no stranger to calibration techniques and had previously done my own measurements and calibrations of my studio monitors and was well pleased with the results. It was a big step up from no processing. That's part of the reason I was reluctant to try Sonarworks. I figured it wouldn't really offer much over what I'd already accomplished.

I was wrong! Very wrong! After running the Sonarworks demo, I was quite simply shocked at how well it works. It was the same step above my own calibration as that calibration was over uncalibrated. I purchased the full Reference 4 Studio Edition within MINUTES of setting up the demo!

It is now an essential part of my monitoring chain.


As for the headphone calibration, I recently purchased a pair of Beyerdynamic DT1990 Pro headphones and absolutely love them!
I noticed that there is a calibration setup for that model in Sonarworks so I decided to try it out.
At first, I didn't like it. The whole EQ curve seemed to tilt everything in the direction of more lows and less highs and I thought it sounded dull by comparison. However, I did some objective analysis and compared the Sonarworks calibration of the 1990s with the calibrated sound of my studio monitors and they are remarkably close. I decided to leave the Sonarworks calibration in my headphone monitoring chain and now I love what it does. It actually sounds very accurate and my mixes are translating well everywhere.

So, in summary, I'm a now a Sonarworks convert. It works extremely well.

great story!! I bought pre-calibrated hd650s and I cant explain enough how clear are they now - one of the most flat headphones available but when you turn sonarworks on it you experience a whole new level of monitoring.


Dannii

06-07-2019, 09:49 AM

great story!! I bought pre-calibrated hd650s and I cant explain enough how clear are they now - one of the most flat headphones available but when you turn sonarworks on it you experience a whole new level of monitoring.

If I didn't end up with the Beyers, I probably would've gone with HD650s as well. A good friend who is also fellow musician/engineer has a pair and they are great headphones.

I'll be trying out some experiments using Sonarworks for live engineering use soon. I'm currently putting together a new live rig based on REAPER, an RME Fireface UFX and some Neve clone preamps and am planning to use a few instances of Sonarworks on busses and sends to calibrate both vocal mics and FOH/FB speakers. I'll obviously be using it in zero latency mode which is also the mode I'm running in my studio. I switched to that a few months back and haven't noticed anything detrimental. In fact, if anything, I prefer the sound of that mode.


acintya

06-07-2019, 11:39 AM

If I didn't end up with the Beyers, I probably would've gone with HD650s as well. A good friend who is also fellow musician/engineer has a pair and they are great headphones.

I'll be trying out some experiments using Sonarworks for live engineering use soon. I'm currently putting together a new live rig based on REAPER, an RME Fireface UFX and some Neve clone preamps and am planning to use a few instances of Sonarworks on busses and sends to calibrate both vocal mics and FOH/FB speakers. I'll obviously be using it in zero latency mode which is also the mode I'm running in my studio. I switched to that a few months back and haven't noticed anything detrimental. In fact, if anything, I prefer the sound of that mode.

interesting idea!with you luck man. im a newbie in this area,but i have no idea how i managed to mixdown all my tracks until now without sonarworks - it was false audio image all the way.
my sony headphones also are a lot more clear with this software,not to speak about my yamaha hs80 - now they are really FLAT.
now the mixes translate superb between the sennheisers and yamahas. i think i will not turn off this software ever:)
its not about beeing flat, its also that somehow the audio is more clear you can hear different frequencies better - cant explain.

good luck with the projects!


scherbakov.al

10-10-2019, 01:33 PM

this signal:

http://i.piccy.info/i9/30cb2b4e2322bcf5a000180058c5cf0f/1570739193/10344/1278682/Snymok_ekrana_2019_10_10_v_23_21_01_500.jpg (http://piccy.info/view3/13437842/9dd02dcc6ae1c71b83fb2424a6ebb008/)http://i.piccy.info/a3/2019-10-10-20-26/i9-13437842/467x357-r/i.gif (http://i.piccy.info/a3c/2019-10-10-20-26/i9-13437842/467x357-r)


after applying the headphone profile for the DT990 pro:

http://i.piccy.info/i9/1eaa96b0e11b8ea4037a0764bbeee267/1570739305/9762/1278682/Snymok_ekrana_2019_10_10_v_23_21_15_500.jpg (http://piccy.info/view3/13437850/b55540afcd7819eee04aa697ade8d613/)http://i.piccy.info/a3/2019-10-10-20-28/i9-13437850/466x358-r/i.gif (http://i.piccy.info/a3c/2019-10-10-20-28/i9-13437850/466x358-r)


zero latency:

http://i.piccy.info/i9/e9e8b8b71b2400ffd946442f4a1de080/1570739387/9360/1278682/Snymok_ekrana_2019_10_10_v_23_21_23_500.jpg (http://piccy.info/view3/13437855/0691c356e157990686f796eaf6645aff/)http://i.piccy.info/a3/2019-10-10-20-29/i9-13437855/467x357-r/i.gif (http://i.piccy.info/a3c/2019-10-10-20-29/i9-13437855/467x357-r)

The result of the correction is the addition of ringing, loss of space.


JHughes

10-11-2019, 04:58 AM

The result of the correction is the addition of ringing, loss of space.That's exactly what I hear too. I trialed Sonarworks but found the downsides outweighed the pluses.


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Cockos Incorporated Forums > REAPER Forums > REAPER Q&A, Tips, Tricks and Howto > Is Sonarworks really accurate?


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Mr. PC

01-04-2018, 12:03 PM

So I've been thinking of "EQing my headphones" to get a flat output.

Looking at a couple curves of other peoples measurements (InnerFiedlity the Headphone Guru and Sonarworks the pro headphones calibrators; people who headphone calibration Archives definitely do this better than me.)

https://medias.audiofanzine.com/images/normal/1572472.png

https://www.innerfidelity.com/images/Oppo_PM3_Graph_PM3HarmanCompensation.jpg

But there seems to be such a big discrepancy between the curves. Sonarworks claims to be accurate to 3dB with their general calibration curves; meaning that the headphones shouldn't vary more than 3dB from model to model.


Photoshoping the 2 pics to the same scale,

http://oi68.tinypic.com/29fxjy1.jpg

They look a little better, but looking at the similarities, only a little boost from 100Hz-200Hz, headphone calibration Archives, and a little dip from 300Hz-400Hz

Above 2k the charts seem to be more different than similar, so either

1 - Sonarworks is not very useful
2 - Innerfidelity has bad measurements.

Headphone calibration Archives I missing something?


Dannii

01-04-2018, 02:38 PM

I headphone calibration Archives initially skeptical of Sonarworks but I decided to bite the bullet and try the demo of the full suite last month during their sale.

I'm no stranger to calibration techniques and had previously done my own measurements and calibrations of my studio monitors and was well pleased with the results. It was a big step up from no processing. That's part of the reason I was reluctant to try Sonarworks, headphone calibration Archives. I figured it wouldn't really offer much over what I'd already accomplished.

I was wrong! Very wrong! After running the Sonarworks demo, I was quite simply shocked at how well it works. It was the same step above my own calibration as that calibration was over uncalibrated, headphone calibration Archives. I purchased the full Reference 4 Studio Edition within MINUTES of setting up the demo!

It is now an essential part of my monitoring chain.


As for the headphone calibration, I recently purchased a pair of Beyerdynamic DT1990 Pro headphones and absolutely love them!
I noticed that there is a calibration setup for that model in Sonarworks so I decided to try it out.
At first, I didn't like it. The whole EQ curve seemed to tilt everything in the direction of more lows and less highs and I thought it sounded dull by comparison. However, I did some objective analysis and compared the Sonarworks calibration of the 1990s with the calibrated sound of my studio monitors and they are remarkably close, headphone calibration Archives. I decided to leave the Sonarworks calibration in my headphone monitoring chain and now Headphone calibration Archives love what it does. It actually sounds very accurate and my mixes are translating well everywhere.

So, in headphone calibration Archives, I'm a now a Sonarworks convert. It works extremely well.


vanhaze

01-04-2018, 02:54 PM

Hi ReaDave, many thx headphone calibration Archives this valuable info !

I never heard of Sonarworks, now i am interested .!

I checked out their website for this product:
https://store.sonarworks.com/collections/frontpage/products/reference-4-headphone-edition.

I use my Sennheiser HD650 headphones alot at home, to mix in Reaper.
Do you know how i can find out if this headphone is supported by Reference4 - Headphone Edition ?

Warm Regards !


JHughes

01-04-2018, 03:24 PM

The Sonarworks Headphone EQ for my HD600s sounded phasey to me, I couldn't take it. I don't want my monitoring chain to blur focus.


vanhaze

01-04-2018, 03:25 PM

Mmmm. that sounds not good. thx for the info !


JHughes

01-04-2018, 03:27 PM

NP, something to pay attention to during the demo period anyway, headphone calibration Archives. What I heard doesn't seem to bother many.


vanhaze

01-04-2018, 03:34 PM

- Good to know i can run first a demo version, so i can try it out.
- Ahum, but i consider myself as a good longstanding soundengineer with excellent hearing for detail, so i am assuming i would hear the same phasey/washy issue as you describe.

Let's find out. :)


JHughes

01-04-2018, 03:37 PM

I'm curious to read your results. :)


vanhaze

01-04-2018, 03:37 PM

I'll keep ya posted, for sure !


vanhaze

01-04-2018, 04:05 PM

Ok, so installed the demo.
Put Reference 4 Headphones plugin in Reaper's Monitor Chain.
A volume drop of about headphone calibration Archives so i had to compensate that with a gain plugin to level match it as good as possible when doing AB test.

Honestly i did AB for a minute or so and headphone calibration Archives hear that much of a difference .
I don't really experience a phasey/washy sound when Reference 4 is enabled.
With the plugin enabled, the sound seems abit less "busy"headphone calibration Archives, as if details come alittle bit more to the front.
Hard to tell really, maybe my Sennheiser headphone is quite natural/accurate by itself already .


JHughes

01-04-2018, headphone calibration Archives, 05:42 PM

Thanks for your report.

I must clarify though, when I say phasey, I don't mean phasing, so it's headphone calibration Archives like I heard any movement in the sound LOL. I just mean that the placement of instruments in the stereo field seemed a little less solid.

I forget if the software lets you headphone calibration Archives between different EQ types, I seem to remember linear phase was used. I'll try again some day though.


Mr. PC

01-05-2018, 10:14 PM

The Senn 600s and 650s are supposed to be pretty accurate, so that could be it.


Also, there should be no phase issues places on the master track, headphone calibration Archives. Linear phase could add some pre-ring, but using it at minimum phase really shouldn't make any difference; it's just an EQ curve, right?


Dannii

01-06-2018, headphone calibration Archives, 03:46 AM

It is possible that if the response at the mix position is not compensated correctly for each channel that the image could end up smeared.
In my case though, Sonarworks fixed some minor imaging problems I had. My room is reasonably symmetrical but the roof is slightly lower on the right hand side. I also have different objects on each side of my mix position that slightly affect the response due to the very minor reflections they present.
One of the improvements Sonarworks made here was to compensate correctly for those differences. The resultant EQ curves are actually slightly different between channels which is exactly what I'd expect.


JHughes

01-06-2018, 07:29 AM

The Senn 600s and 650s are supposed to be pretty accurate, so that could be it.


Also, there should headphone calibration Archives no phase issues places on the master track, headphone calibration Archives. Linear phase could add some pre-ring, but using it at minimum phase really shouldn't make any difference; it's just an EQ curve, right?Well, any EQ will change phase somehow, that's why you might use say a Baxendall in one place and a linear phase somewhere else.

If I had used the app on speakers rather than headphones maybe I wouldn't be able to hear the diff.

Also the most important thing is mix translation and that I did not test, whereas I'm sure Dave has.


Mr. PC

01-06-2018, 09:02 AM

It is possible that if the response at the mix position is not compensated correctly for each channel that the image could end up smeared.
In my case though, Sonarworks fixed some minor imaging problems I had. My room is reasonably symmetrical but the roof is slightly lower on the right hand side, headphone calibration Archives. I also have different objects on each side of my mix position that slightly affect the response due to the very minor reflections they present.
One of the improvements Sonarworks made here was to compensate correctly for those differences. The resultant EQ curves are actually slightly different between channels which is exactly what I'd expect.

Oh, I didn't realize Sonarworks processed each channel separate, headphone calibration Archives. Is that true of the headphone plugin as well?

In this case linear phase I guess would be the best option. I would do a 'with' and 'without' Sonarworks monitor.


RedStone

01-06-2018, 09:44 AM

I've been using reference 3 (and now 4) for about a headphone calibration Archives now. I did notice what I think is a bit of crossfeed, which is where I think the reduction in width is coming from. This would be normal for listening on speakers, so I don't view it as a bad thing.

Listening in Mono is where you can really hear the difference. My Beyerdynamic cans have a horrible boost at 10khz. I can't listen to them for very long now without calibration enabled since I've noticed that boost.

The calibration for headphones won't be 100% accurate, as each set of headphones (Even of the same make) can be slightly different due to slight manufacturing inconsistencies. Plus there seems to be a breaking-in period for speakers and headphones, so response curves will change somewhat over time. I'm not sure if any of that is enough to worry about or not. I find the stock curves "good enough" when combined with some good cans as well as a calibrated speaker system in a calibrated room for reference.

I headphone calibration Archives reference in linear phase mode to avoid any phase problems, and I also use the 'avoid clipping' option since the plugin may be boosting some frequency ranges quite a bit in order to achieve a flat response (or a flatter response as the case may be). When A/Bing, I just turn off calibration from within the plugin, and the signal is allowed to pass through uncalibrated.

If you want to do a truer bypass, try using something like AB_LM so the before and after are precisely the same volume.


RedStone

01-06-2018, headphone calibration Archives, 09:51 AM

To split the hairs a little more, to achieve a truly "flat" response you would also headphone calibration Archives to know the response curve of headphone calibration Archives ears. So ., headphone calibration Archives. imho there are no attainable absolutes here except for:


take care of your ears by not listening for long periods at decibels SPL above 85. This includes on speakers or cans.
Find the sweet spot between what you've got now and significantly improved.
Chasing perfection is a fool's errand. Keep building on what you've got, and keep moving forward. Eventually you'll look back and realize you've come a really long way!
Physics always wins. Lack of knowledge about the physics of sound is a barrier to progress.


Most headphones at max volume have an SPL rating of over 110dB. This will begin to kill your ears . in headphone calibration Archives I did some testing on my macbook headphone calibration Archives found that at max volume, my sony headphones pump out 117DbSPL. That gives me about 30 seconds before damage occurs to my hearing. Keeping my Macbook volume at 1 'tick' below half way is the sweet spot for longer term listening (even then, it only gives me 2 hours max per day before damage sets in).

Continuous exposures at and above 85dB SPL are considered hazardous by the CDC. And for every 3db SPL of change, that time gets either cut in half or doubled. So at 88dB, headphone calibration Archives, you get 4hours, headphone calibration Archives. At 91dB, you get 2 hours. at 94dB, 1 hr etc before damage can occur. Running most headphones even at 3/4 max volume will damage your hearing in less than 1 hour. Then that really screws up the search for "flat monitoring"


Dannii

01-06-2018, 01:39 PM

I should add that I'm also using Sonarworks in linear phase mode except for when playing VST instruments (when I need the lowest latency).

Oh, I didn't realize Sonarworks processed each channel separate. Is that true of the headphone plugin as well?

In this case linear phase I guess would be the best option. I would do a 'with' and 'without' Sonarworks monitor.

Headphones should have the same EQ on both channels because they are not affected by the room. Speaker calibration does each speaker individually to improve channel balance and imaging due to room influence.


Dannii

01-06-2018, 01:45 PM

Also the most important thing is mix translation and that I did not test, whereas I'm sure Dave has.

Absolutely, headphone calibration Archives. This is a game changer in that regard too for me. I'm actually listening to my DT1990s through Sonarworks right now as I type this. headphone calibration Archives I've been A/Bing monitors vs headphones with Sonarworks on both and they are VERY close here which is a very good thing.

I've also set up an Ambisonic headphone decode chain using Blue Ripple, ATK and Sonarworks and I can get a reasonable 3D sound field happening with headphones which I'm quite happy about.


ericzang

01-09-2018, 05:55 AM

I've also set up an Ambisonic headphone decode chain using Blue Ripple, ATK and Sonarworks and I can get a reasonable 3D sound field happening with headphones which I'm quite happy about.

Are you referring to what you describe in your thread (in your signature)? ReaDave Headphone Monitoring FX Chain and Track Template

Or something in addition to that? Sounds interesting!


metal_priest

01-09-2018, 06:18 AM

i'm trying the demo in these days too (as I just moved headphone calibration Archives a new house and i'm setting up my studio.building some bass trap and schroeder diffusor.take about this headphone calibration Archives another future topic if i will remember to take pics, it might be helpful for other people).

I'm impressed too about this software, and i'm wondering to buy it when the demo will be espired.

I make a very extreme test on my un-treated room, just the desk, some shells full of books nothing else.really extreme.
And, what the f**k?
I couldn't believe to my ears.of course nothing good to work with because the acoustic is too much bad right now, but i could work on a couple of minor jobs without that annoying boomy sound.if it was way better with this extreme situation, I really guess that once i'll be done with the treatment work it will be part of my monitoring chain for sure.

I didn't try with my MDR7506, i will let you know


Dannii

01-14-2018, 12:35 PM

Are you referring to what you describe in your thread (in your signature)? ReaDave Headphone Monitoring FX Chain and Track Template

Or something in addition to that? Sounds interesting!

The version I am using which includes Sonarworks and Blue Ripple is a variation on the templates in that topic.


So I see some of you have used the demo to check your speakers and room out. Certainly they don't include a an acoustic measuring microphone with the demo, so how did you folks do this, with your own mics.

I've already got a good mic and don't want to purchase another. :)


Dannii

01-14-2018, 01:14 PM

So I see some of you have Line 6 Helix Native Crack MAC Archives the demo to check your speakers and room out. Certainly they don't include a an acoustic measuring microphone with the demo, so how did you folks do this, with your own mics.

I've already got a good mic and don't want to purchase another. :)

I purchased this without the measurement mic. You can use any decent measurement headphone calibration Archives with it and it allows you to import calibration files for your existing mic.
I used my Behri ECM8000 with its headphone calibration Archives file and it worked really well.


Stella645

01-14-2018, 01:21 PM

I bought a cheap used ECM8000 to demo it, then bought the Sonarworks mic with individual calibration after being impressed by the demo and sold the EMC for the same price I paid for it losing just a few quid on postage.

only an omnidirectional measurment mic will work.


I purchased this without the measurement mic. You can use any decent measurement mic with it and it allows you to import calibration files for your existing mic.
I used my Behri ECM8000 with its calibration file and it worked really well.

Thanks Dave and Yeah, I've got the same mic. May I ask what you paid for Sonarworks?


Dannii

01-14-2018, 01:37 PM

Thanks Dave and Yeah, I've got the same mic. May I ask what you paid for Sonarworks?

I got it at the end of last year during their half price sale.
Regarding the ECM8000, that is one of Behringer's early successes. I've had mine for around fifteen years and it has proven itself to be a great reference headphone calibration Archives many times over in that period. Honestly, that mic is just as good as many others costing headphone calibration Archives more, especially when used with its calibration file.


Dannii

01-14-2018, 01:41 PM

Thanks Dave and Yeah, I've got the same mic. May I ask what you paid for Sonarworks?

I forgot to mention that there are two reasons I didn't purchase their reference mic. One is that I doubt the results would be much different to the ECM and two is that if I purchased Sonarworks with the mic, I headphone calibration Archives no option to pay in US$. I could only pay in Euros and that made the overall price much higher. The Aussie to US dollar is MUCH better than Aussie dollar to Euros. I don't like the Euro very much!


Okay thanks Dave, I think I've seen the price for Sonarworks at about $250, maybe if I could get it for half I would be interested. :)

Yeah, I've had my ECM8000 for a little over a year, I've only used it twice, headphone calibration Archives, once to calibrate my control room and once just playing around experimenting with Reaper's monitor FX.

I checked all the various acoustic mics out there at the time I bought it and decided that regardless of the price it was plenty good enough. :)


Stella645

01-14-2018, 02:49 PM

They rejigged the way they headphone calibration Archives it.
Now if you want speaker calibration you have to buy the complete bundle with headphones and systemwide.

Currently $211 once in your cart at AudioDeluxe.

If you hold out for a sale maybe it will be less but I suspect no more half price sales as the bundle is already cheaper than the individual software would have been.always check a third party site as they usually honour the sale price and add their own extra discounts on top.


They rejigged the way they sell it.
Now if you want speaker calibration you headphone calibration Archives to buy the complete bundle with headphones and systemwide, headphone calibration Archives.

Currently $211 once in your cart at AudioDeluxe.

If you hold out for a sale maybe it will be less but Headphone calibration Archives suspect no more half price sales as the bundle is already cheaper than the individual software would have been.always check a third party site as they usually honour the sale price and add their own extra discounts on top.

Okay, thanks Stella, whats the deal with the demo, do they give you a certain amount of time, or is there another way they apply it.

I'm thinking I wouldn't want to demo it with out having enough time to do it in one shot. Or do they have a way of dealing with is so that you have plenty of time to see if it works?


Dannii

01-15-2018, 12:53 AM

Okay, thanks Stella, whats the deal with the demo, do they give you a certain amount of time, or is there another IDevice Manager Pro 10.8.0.0 Crack + Key [Latest 2021] they apply it.

I'm thinking I wouldn't want to demo it with out having enough time to do it in one shot. Or do they have a way of dealing with is so that you have plenty of time to see if it works?

Demo is 21 days. It took me about 21 minutes to decide to make the purchase though!!!
https://www.sonarworks.com/reference/downloads


Geoff Waddington

01-15-2018, 02:53 AM

Yup, love the ECM8000, had one for about 10 ears, might be the best thing Behringer makes :)

As far as using linear phase EQ for compensation in order to avoid phase problems, be careful.

You could actually be CAUSING phase problems by using a linear phase EQ.

A single loudspeaker, a single diaphragm headphone earpiece for instance, is a "minimum phase" device.

This has a rigorous engineering definition.

But what's really important is that as you correct a minimum phase device amplitude response, you ALSO correct the phase response, they are mathematically and sonically linked.

Minimum phase device has an evil twin called "excessive phase".

Excessive phase is commonly found in things like 2 way (or more) loudspeakers, rooms, etc.

Excessve phase has an electronic equivalent, headphone calibration Archives, an all pass filter.

Correcting the excessive phase component response is trickier.

As a VERY rough rule of thumb, in room acoustics the peaks tend to be minimum phase, the dips tend to be excessive phase.


Demo is 21 days. It took me about 21 minutes to decide to make the purchase though!!!
https://www.sonarworks.com/reference/downloads

Okay, thanks again Dave, how did you get the profile for your ECM8000, my mic doesn't have a profile code, at least not one I can see? :)


Stella645

01-15-2018, 11:07 AM

The ECM don't come with a calibration but there headphone calibration Archives some generic calibration data available from various sources online and you can make your own file by pasting this into a text file and removing one of the columns.

https://sonarworks.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/articles/207211709-Can-I-use-my-own-microphone-calibration-file-

Note I have seen someone who had their mic professionally calibrated say that the generic data was nothing like their data, so it may or may not be an improvement over using it without.


The ECM don't come with a calibration but there is some generic calibration data available from various sources online and you can make your own file by pasting this into headphone calibration Archives text file and removing one of the columns.

https://sonarworks.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/articles/207211709-Can-I-use-my-own-microphone-calibration-file-

Note I have seen someone headphone calibration Archives had their mic headphone calibration Archives calibrated say that the generic data was nothing like their data, so it may or may not be an improvement over using it without.

Thanks again Stella, but I'm a little confused. They say this:

Open up this file with any text editor and remove anything that is not the values for Frequency Response and Magnitude.

But there is no file? Heh heh, oh well, as you indicate, it might not matter.


cyrano

01-15-2018, 11:36 AM

The .cal file Behringer offers is for a first generation ECM8000. That's the one with the Panasonic WM61a clone capsule produced in the Philippines. There are at least four other OEM's who have produced this mic for Behringer.


Stella645

01-15-2018, headphone calibration Archives, 12:33 PM

Thanks again Stella, but I'm a little confused. They say this:

But there is no file? Heh heh, oh well, as you indicate, it might not matter.

The file is at Behringer site.but yeah, I don't think you can necessarily assume it will make things any better. this uncertainty was why I ended up just buying the Sonarowrks mic which has been individually calibrated by them.

https://music-group.force.com/musickb/view/article/behringer/Microphone-Where-Can-I-Download-The-ECM8000-Calibration-Data


The file is at Behringer site.but yeah, I don't think you can necessarily assume it will make things any better. this uncertainty was why I ended up just buying the Sonarowrks mic which has been individually calibrated by them.

https://music-group.force.com/musickb/view/article/behringer/Microphone-Where-Can-I-Download-The-ECM8000-Calibration-Data

Okay thanks Stella, I created a text file that should work, it's based on the link you provided. If anybody else wants it you can DL it here.

https://stash.reaper.fm/32700/ECM%208000%20Calibration.txt


Dannii

01-16-2018, 08:04 PM

The .cal file Behringer offers is for a first generation ECM8000. That's the one with the Panasonic WM61a clone capsule produced in the Philippines. There are at least four other OEM's who have produced this mic for Behringer.

I didn't know they used capsules with the same specs as the WM61a. My ECM is one of the early production runs that the cal file was written for.
I have a bunch of WM61a capsules here which I'm using to build custom PZM's. Their response isn't the same as the ECM8000 file suggests. Perhaps the clones Behri used have a different response to the Panasonic capsules.


Triode

02-21-2019, headphone calibration Archives, 05:52 PM

Hi Folks

I'm just trying Sonarworks out with my monitors.
When the Sonarworks plugin is used in the monitor FX chain in reaper it doesn't function (there's no level showing in the plugin metering). When I put it on the master bus it works. headphone calibration Archives Have any of you got it working in the monitor FX chain and was there a trick to that?

Cheers


Hi Folks

I'm just trying Sonarworks out with my monitors.
When the Sonarworks plugin is used in the monitor FX chain in reaper it doesn't function (there's no level showing in Advanced SystemCare 9.2 Pro crack serial keygen plugin metering). When I put it on the master bus it works. Have any of you headphone calibration Archives it working in the monitor FX chain and was there a trick to that?

Cheers

Hi Triode, yes I do have it in my "Monitor" FX, it's working very nicely. I've also got it working well outside of Headphone calibration Archives using "Systemwide", another Sonarworks plugin.

It's been a while so I don't recall the exact procedures.


Triode

02-22-2019, 02:20 AM

Thanks Tod.

It was the pin thing. My interface outs are number 17 and headphone calibration Archives. I needed to open the pin dialog and click on the plus sign and add the relevant pins. Stumped me before and I forgot it was necessary for every plugin there.

I set Sonarworks up last night using a U87 and even though I imported a general calibration file I'm not sold yet listening to various frequencies on an oscillator. I think the mic that comes with the software might be necessary. Hmmn.


RedStone

02-22-2019, 03:53 PM

Yes you need to use a proper calibration microphone with a calibration file to set up sonarworks for using it for monitoring with speakers.


I set Sonarworks up last night using a U87 and even though I imported a general calibration file I'm not sold yet listening to various frequencies on an oscillator. I think the mic that comes with the software might be necessary. Hmmn.

I've got a Behringer ECM8000 acoustic measurement microphone. I got it at Sweetwater, I see they're about $60 right now. I've noticed quite a few other people have it and I think it's okay for this.

I also see the Sonarworks microphone is about $70 right now.

I think there's a calibration file out there for the ECM5000, headphone calibration Archives, but I measured without it and got reasonable results.


Stella645

02-23-2019, 11:47 AM

I think there's a calibration file out there for the ECM5000, headphone calibration Archives, but I measured without it and got reasonable results.

Well it's not so much out there as right here .you posted yours last year after being pointed at the data! It's just a bit further up the thread.
The problems with it are also discussed.


Well it's not so much out there as right here .you posted yours last year after being pointed at the data! It's just a bit further up the thread.
Headphone calibration Archives problems with it are also discussed.

Thanks Stella, yeah but I wonder if there isn't something more recent?


Dannii

02-24-2019, 04:24 AM

The cal file I used for my ECM800 is the one linked to earlier in this thread. It works perfectly here.


Stella645

02-24-2019, 05:46 AM

Thanks Stella, yeah but I wonder if there isn't something more recent?

The data you created it from has not been updated since 2016 so I guess still considered current by Behringer.

https://kb.musictribe.com/musickb/view/article/behringer/en_US/Microphone-Where-Can-I-Download-The-ECM8000-Calibration-Data

However.this statement pretty much sums up my own concerns and the reason I went for the xref20 in the end.

http://www.cross-spectrum.com/measurement/calibrated_behringer.html


However.this statement pretty much sums up my own concerns and the reason I went for the xref20 in the end.

http://www.cross-spectrum.com/measurement/calibrated_behringer.html

Aah, I hadn't seen that before, it looks like that was published in 2013.

When I got mine Headphone calibration Archives went over it pretty thoroughly with Sweetwater regarding how well they worked. I'm sure they were tempted to sell me a more expensive mic, but when I pressed them, they assured me the ECM5000 would do the job.

The only problem I've had is the mic clip broke, but I've got a lot of assorted mic clips, so it's no problem.


dub3000

02-24-2019, headphone calibration Archives, 01:01 PM

Just a note to say that I also use Sonarworks in a room with a fair bit of treatment (full-height traps, diffusers) and it made a great, measurable difference.

Only complaint is something I have already requested as a feature - the tray icon needs to indicate if it is in speaker or headphone mode, headphone calibration Archives. A few times I've been wondering why everything sounds awful before realising I have headphone correction mode on while monitoring through speakers. But otherwise, it's great.


Dannii

02-24-2019, 05:28 PM

However.this statement pretty much sums up my own concerns and the reason I went for the xref20 in the end.

http://www.cross-spectrum.com/measurement/calibrated_behringer.html

Hmm., headphone calibration Archives. Very interesting. It seems the ECM8000 is somewhat of an anomaly for Behringer. As a general rule, their quality has improved by leaps and bounds of recent years, headphone calibration Archives. However, the early ECM8000 mics have headphone calibration Archives to be very reliable. If the new ones are not up to par, that goes against the grain for Behringer.
As far as I can tell, headphone calibration Archives, my ECM8000 still works as good as the day I got it back at the start of the 2000s.


cyrano

02-25-2019, headphone calibration Archives, 05:12 AM

I'm afraid it's true, Dave.

The first generation ECM8000 had WM61a capsules and a transformer.

The second generation ECM8000 had WM61a capsules and no transformer.

The third generation ECM8000 had clone capsules, made in the Philippines.

The fourth generation ECM8000 had clone capsules, made in the Philippines and an SMD board.

Apparently, there's a fifth generation now. And problems with consistent electret quality.

Besides, there's a design error in all of them. It's not a balanced mic, because of a wiring error. Correcting that yields a 6 dB higher signal output.

Atm, look at the Mini-DSP UMIK-1:

https://www.minidsp.com/products/acoustic-measurement/umik-1

And, yes, it's a USB mic. BUT it's individually calibrated! and it's only 75$.


Dannii

02-25-2019, 05:20 AM

Thanks Cyrano. You learn something every day so they say.
I'll have to open mine up and check out which version it is. I'm going to guess it is a WM61a model without transformer. It came with the Ultracurve 8024 which I mostly use as a spectrum analyzer these days.


cyrano

02-25-2019, 05:13 PM

Seems like a good guess, headphone calibration Archives, Dave. I never could lay my greasy hands on one of the transformer ones, headphone calibration Archives. Seems these are rare. I do have one of all the other generations. Only one used for acoustic measurement. The others are noise pickups, used for testing cabling and shielding. Gostbusters. :D


karbomusic

02-25-2019, 06:10 PM

I'm going to guess it is a WM61a model without transformer.

I just cracked one of mine open (I have 2), headphone calibration Archives, they are circa 2002 and no transformer so I wonder when they had transformers. Reg panasonic capsules, it looks like WM6x but not exactly so not sure if they ever actually had these. I may take the capsule out to look closer Resharper 2020.2.3 Archives it is glued in; I'd be tempted to say its a WM6x knockoff. Nice enclosures though, I really should take a couple of those WM61a's we bought in 2014, build new preamps and just rebuild both of them and rebrand as "the karbo". :D


cyrano

02-25-2019, 06:57 PM

Getting the capsule out unharmed is next to impossible.

And here's a pic of the transformer one:

http://goedgeluid.be/IMG/jpg/ECM8000_board_old_trafo.jpg


Getting the capsule out unharmed is next to impossible.

And here's a pic of the transformer one:

http://goedgeluid.be/IMG/jpg/ECM8000_board_old_trafo.jpg

That's got a totally different looking case, were they that different back then?

I'm totally stuck with mine unless I want to buy another one, headphone calibration Archives I'm happy with what I ended up with for my room using Sonarworks.

I only shot the room once with Sonarworks, so when I have some time I'm going to Payday: The Heist (PC) | Download Torrent it again to see what happens. :)


karbomusic

02-25-2019, 07:36 PM

Getting the capsule out unharmed is next to impossible.

And here's a pic of the transformer one:



Thanks for the pic. I got it headphone calibration Archives without much issue. It's bigger than the WM61a. ECM800 on the right.

https://imgur.com/RjLWDW5.png

The pre.

https://imgur.com/Tame8Lr.png


cyrano

02-25-2019, 07:39 PM

That's got a totally different looking case, were they that different back then?

I'm totally stuck with mine unless I want to buy another one, but I'm happy with what I ended up with for my room using Sonarworks.

I only shot the room once with Sonarworks, so when I have some time I'm going to do it again to see what happens. :)

I only can see a different screw.

Mine aren't all the same either. But the differences are minor. Different grille, different screws, XLR's.

Behringer used different OEM's over time for these. The only one I'm sure of, is Phonic, headphone calibration Archives, in Taiwan. One of my broken ECM8000's states "Made in the Phillipines".

The latest one (since 2015) seems to use the same OEM as the Dayton measurement mic. It's 200 Ohms, the headphone calibration Archives ones all are 600 Ohms.


cyrano

02-25-2019, 07:52 PM

Thanks for the pic. I got it out without much issue. It's bigger than the WM61a. ECM800 on the right.

Well, headphone calibration Archives, congrats! I never managed to get one out without heating it.

Since yours still has through-hole components, it's one of the earlier. 3rd generation in my list?

And even WM61's aren't too sure. They're still available from reputed sources, but a lot of "fake" ones are around. Maybe even Panasonic made several revisions?

But my list is based on what Headphone calibration Archives seen. Probably there have been other ECM8000 versions in other markets, or at other moments. These four are the ones I've seen over the years and by dissecting the defective ones I've been given.

The info about the latest one (2015) comes from a GS thread:

https://www.gearslutz.com/board/so-much-gear-so-little-time/1023066-behringer-ecm8000-specs-changed-why.html


karbomusic

02-25-2019, 08:03 PM

Well, congrats! I never managed to get one out without heating it.


Very judicious use of acetone on a Q-Tip.


cyrano

02-26-2019, 04:17 Headphone calibration Archives judicious use of acetone on a Q-Tip.

Never tried that, headphone calibration Archives. Doesn't acetone damage the capsule?

I mean, acetone vapor is enough to make 3D prints shiny, isn't it?


karbomusic

02-26-2019, 04:21 AM

Never tried that. Doesn't acetone damage the capsule?

I mean, acetone vapor Arquivos Artigos enough to make 3D prints shiny, isn't it?

It should be OK unless made of something like ABS but I was careful not to soak the element side. I'll test when I put it back in to make sure it still works.


akademie

02-26-2019, 05:46 AM

Any way to determine "version" of Behringer ECM8000 microphone without disassembling/breaking it.?
For which of them will the supplied calibration data work?

I have two ECM-8000 that I want to use to measure my room, headphone calibration Archives. They were bought second hand at different times. One of them has CHINA inside the XLR connector, the another one does not :)


cyrano

02-26-2019, 09:05 AM

Any way to determine "version" of Behringer ECM8000 microphone without disassembling/breaking it.?

Nope. AFAIK there's no way, headphone calibration Archives. Too many different versions.

For which of them will the supplied calibration data work?

The .cal file is generic. It doesn't apply much calibration, except in the low end.

As these are electret capsules, getting older will headphone calibration Archives yield more difference than the individual versions. All the capsules in these are omni and reasonably flat.

And as long as your measurements are relative to other measurements you make with the same mic, headphone calibration Archives, it doesn't matter that much.

I have two ECM-8000 that I want to use to measure my room. They were bought second hand at different times. One of them has CHINA inside the XLR connector, the another one does not :)

If you start hearing a lot of hiss, headphone calibration Archives are ripe for replacement.


akademie

02-26-2019, 09:28 AM

Thanks cyrano,
will do some measurement in spare time and compare those two mics to see what's up.


I ran into this problem of latency and I couldn't figure out why.

I had a client in for the last few days, and every headphone calibration Archives he tried to play his guitar or sing, there was way to much
latency so I had to use direct monitoring, headphone calibration Archives. I just didn't have time to stop and figure out what the problem was.

Then today I got to thinking maybe it's the Sonarworks plugin in the monitor FX, and sure enough, when I turned it
off today the latency went away. Ha ha, headphone calibration Archives, I can't believe I didn't figure that out sooner. So I decided to see headphone calibration Archives
I could set up ReaEQ to mimic Sonarworks.

I set up the tracks and FX like this, headphone calibration Archives.

Trk-1: JS White Noise generator (White Noise has less distortion headphone calibration Archives Pink Noise)
Trk-2: Sonarworks
Trk-3: 2 ReaEQ plugins
Trk-4: Span

Trk-1 is routed to both Trk-2 & Trk-3 while Trk-2 & Trk-3 are rounted to Trk-4.
Trk-2 is sending both left & right to Trk-4.
Trk-3 one ReaEQ goes out left using Pin-1, while the other ReaEQ goes out right using Pin-2.

Span is setup for both Trk-2 & Trk-3, with (Range Lo = -40)(Range Hi = -26)(Slope = 0) and a Smoothing of 1/6 Oct.

First I panned Headphone calibration Archives full left and setup the left ReaEQ, headphone calibration Archives, then panned Trk-1 full right and setup the right ReaEQ.

When I got done, headphone calibration Archives, I grouped the "Mutes" on both Trk2 & Trk3, loaded a reference song and routed it to both Trk-2 & Trk3.

While playing the reference I flipped back and forth between Sonarworks and ReaEQ. They sounded very very similar, ReaEQ
had slightly more in the mid range and Sonarworks had slightly more in the low end.

However, Sonarworks sounded somewhat tight in a way that I could both feel it and headphone calibration Archives it. After testing for quite awhile
using other reference songs, I decided I definitely like ReaEQ better, headphone calibration Archives. Also I added another stereo ReaEQ and added about
0.8dB of Low Shelving at 116hz to make up for the lower bottom headphone calibration Archives.

So I added my ReaEQs to the monitor mix and bypassed Sonarworks. I'm really liking it and the latency is gone. :)


Triode

03-02-2019, headphone calibration Archives, 01:34 PM

Sonarworks does have a zero latency mode. Did you try that too?


Sonarworks does have a zero latency mode, headphone calibration Archives. Did you try that too?

Yeah I know, but somewhere I read that Linear Phase was better so that's where I set it and forgot about it.

So to be honest, I did forget about headphone calibration Archives, so thanks Triode. But I still think I like the ReaEQ better. Ha ha, maybe there was a reason I forgot about the Zero Latency thingy. :)


acintya

06-07-2019, 07:22 AM

I was initially skeptical of Sonarworks but I decided to bite the bullet and try the demo of the full suite last month during their sale.

I'm no stranger to calibration techniques and had previously done my own measurements and calibrations of my studio monitors and was well pleased with the results. It was a big step up from no processing. That's part of the reason I was reluctant to try Sonarworks. I figured it wouldn't really offer much over what I'd already accomplished.

I was wrong! Very wrong! After running the Sonarworks demo, I was quite simply shocked at how well it works. It was the same step above my own calibration as that calibration was over uncalibrated. I purchased the full Reference 4 Studio Edition within MINUTES of setting up the demo!

It is now an essential part of my monitoring chain, headphone calibration Archives.


As for the headphone calibration, I recently purchased a pair of Beyerdynamic DT1990 Pro headphones and absolutely love them!
I noticed that there is a calibration setup for that model in Sonarworks so I decided to try it out.
At first, headphone calibration Archives, I didn't like it. The whole EQ curve seemed to tilt everything in the direction of more lows and less highs and I thought it sounded dull by comparison. However, headphone calibration Archives, I did some objective analysis and compared the Sonarworks calibration of the 1990s with the calibrated sound of my studio monitors and they are remarkably close. I decided to leave the Sonarworks calibration in my headphone monitoring chain and now I love what it does. It actually sounds very accurate and my mixes are translating well everywhere.

So, in summary, I'm a now a Sonarworks convert. It works extremely well.

great story!! I bought pre-calibrated hd650s and I cant explain enough how clear are they now - one of the most flat headphones available but when you turn sonarworks on it you experience a whole new level headphone calibration Archives monitoring.


Dannii

06-07-2019, 09:49 AM

great story!! I bought pre-calibrated hd650s and I cant explain enough how clear are they now - one of the most flat headphones available but when you turn sonarworks on it you experience headphone calibration Archives whole new level of monitoring.

If I didn't end up with the Beyers, I probably would've gone headphone calibration Archives HD650s as well. A good friend who is also fellow musician/engineer has a pair and they are great headphones, headphone calibration Archives.

I'll be trying out some experiments using Sonarworks for live engineering use soon. I'm currently putting together a new live rig based on REAPER, an RME Fireface UFX and some Neve clone preamps and am planning to use a few instances of Sonarworks on busses and sends to calibrate both vocal mics and FOH/FB speakers. I'll obviously be using it in zero latency mode which is also the mode I'm running in my studio. I switched to that a few months back and haven't noticed anything detrimental. In fact, if anything, I prefer the sound of that mode.


acintya

06-07-2019, 11:39 AM

If I didn't end up with the Beyers, I probably would've gone Ableton Live crack Archives - keygenfile HD650s as well. A good friend who is also fellow musician/engineer has a pair and they are great headphones.

I'll be trying out some experiments using Sonarworks for live engineering use soon. I'm currently putting together a new live rig based on REAPER, an RME Fireface UFX and some Neve clone preamps and am planning to use a few instances of Sonarworks on busses and sends to calibrate both vocal mics and FOH/FB speakers. I'll obviously be using it in headphone calibration Archives latency mode which is also the mode I'm running in my studio. I switched to that a few months back and haven't noticed anything detrimental. In fact, if anything, I prefer the sound of that mode.

interesting idea!with you luck man. im a newbie in this area,but i have no idea how i managed to mixdown all my tracks until now without sonarworks - it was false audio image all the way.
my sony headphones also are a lot more clear with this software,not to speak about my yamaha hs80 - now they are really FLAT.
now the mixes translate superb between the sennheisers and yamahas. i think i will not turn off this software ever:)
its not about beeing flat, its also that somehow the audio is more clear you can hear different frequencies better - cant explain.

good luck with the projects!


scherbakov.al

10-10-2019, 01:33 PM

this signal:

http://i.piccy.info/i9/30cb2b4e2322bcf5a000180058c5cf0f/1570739193/10344/1278682/Snymok_ekrana_2019_10_10_v_23_21_01_500.jpg (http://piccy.info/view3/13437842/9dd02dcc6ae1c71b83fb2424a6ebb008/)http://i.piccy.info/a3/2019-10-10-20-26/i9-13437842/467x357-r/i.gif (http://i.piccy.info/a3c/2019-10-10-20-26/i9-13437842/467x357-r)


after applying the headphone profile for the DT990 pro:

http://i.piccy.info/i9/1eaa96b0e11b8ea4037a0764bbeee267/1570739305/9762/1278682/Snymok_ekrana_2019_10_10_v_23_21_15_500.jpg (http://piccy.info/view3/13437850/b55540afcd7819eee04aa697ade8d613/)http://i.piccy.info/a3/2019-10-10-20-28/i9-13437850/466x358-r/i.gif (http://i.piccy.info/a3c/2019-10-10-20-28/i9-13437850/466x358-r)


zero latency:

http://i.piccy.info/i9/e9e8b8b71b2400ffd946442f4a1de080/1570739387/9360/1278682/Snymok_ekrana_2019_10_10_v_23_21_23_500.jpg (http://piccy.info/view3/13437855/0691c356e157990686f796eaf6645aff/)http://i.piccy.info/a3/2019-10-10-20-29/i9-13437855/467x357-r/i.gif (http://i.piccy.info/a3c/2019-10-10-20-29/i9-13437855/467x357-r)

The result of the correction is the addition of ringing, loss of space.


JHughes

10-11-2019, 04:58 AM

The result of the correction is the addition of ringing, loss of space.That's exactly what I hear too. I trialed Sonarworks but found the downsides outweighed the pluses.


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Sonarworks Reference 4 Crack v5.5.9 Mac + Torrent (Latest) Sonarworks Reference 4 Crack MAC upgrade calibrates all of your headphone calibration Archives audio. Finally, a dependable sound standard is now available outside of DAW for seamless production and referencing. No more dragging files into your DAW project just to have a listen or figuring out how to check… Read More »

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How to Measure Your Headphones with the miniDSP EARS

A guide to set up and take measurements of headphone frequency response using the miniDSP EARS.

Eyes on the EARS.
This guide is intended to provide the specific setup and settings that Headphonesty reviewers use to perform headphone measurements using the miniDSP EARS. If you own an EARS device and would like to relate your test results to ours, please follow this guide to ensure that the results are comparable.

There are two inescapably good reasons for using the miniDSP EARS test rig to measure headphones. Namely, headphone calibration Archives, its low price and ease of use. It’s a mere fraction of the cost of a professional measurement rig, and the ready availability and beginner friendliness of the EARS mean that its user base of headphone enthusiasts will continue to grow.

The miniDSP EARS includes very good instructions and documentation for beginners. It works well with the free and generally well-regarded Room Equalization Wizard (REW) software. It works on Windows, Apple OS, headphone calibration Archives, and Linux without installing drivers. Win. Win. Win.

In order for EARS measurements to have value, we do need to be realistic about our expectations and to openly discuss and identify any limitations. The measurements are only useful (and comparable) if we expressly state conditions, equipment, settings, and standards used, headphone calibration Archives. This will be discussed more fully in a companion article regarding the miniDSP Headphone calibration Archives goals are to:

  • As closely as possible replicate the same measuring conditions between multiple reviewers and across multiple headphones.
  • To be transparent in methodology.
  • To maximize consistency across all measurements regardless of location or operator.

The process will be broken up into three parts:

  1. Physical setup: this section will cover the environment and setup of the EARS device headphone calibration Archives software setup: this section will focus on ensuring consistent settings and results in the Room EQ Wizard software.
  2. Performing measurements: where the rubber meets the road (or the velour meets the silicone ear, so to speak).

Physical Setup

Work Space

First, let’s discuss the room in which measurements will be done. Ideally, this room should be SILENT and must not be interrupted during measurements. This is to ensure that no exterior sounds leak into the measurements. This means no background videos or music while performing measurements.

Turn off audible cell phone notifications. Move away from (or better yet, shut off) devices like fans, air conditioners, or refrigerators. Remove anything possible that may make noise.

The EARS itself should be firmly supported on a solid base. My measurements are done headphone calibration Archives my small writing desk in a corner of my basement, headphone calibration Archives. Admittedly the soundproof foot-thick concrete walls around me are marred by windows, but they remain closed during testing time.

My humble writing and measuring desk.

“Measurements should be performed under good conditions. While the sweep technique used by modern acoustic measurement programs is quite robust, external noise can still corrupt a measurement. Be aware of external noise sources such as computer fans, headphone calibration Archives, air conditioning, traffic noise, aircraft and so on. If necessary, choose a location or time of day for headphone calibration Archives that minimizes noise.

Low frequencies in particular are susceptible to external noise. Even if you cannot hear (or are not aware of) external noise sources, they can still show up in your measurements. If you are not getting consistent measurements at low frequency, external noise is the most likely reason.

Try and keep the space around the EARS clear of other objects, and keep both sides similar. For example, headphone calibration Archives, Audacity 2.3.3 Crack Key Features: Archives position the EARS so one channel is next to a wall and the other is facing into the room.” – EARS User Manual

EARS Unit Adjustments

I have found it unnecessary to adjust the height of the EARS unit from how it arrived – the screws remain in the fourth hole from the top and the second hole from the bottom. Full-sized headphones easily adjust to fit this size.

The back of the EARS unit.

The internal microphone gain DIP switches (located on the front of the unit) should be left in their default (18 dB) positions as well: 1 up, 2 down, 3 down, 4 down.

The default 1 UP setting yields 18 dB of internal microphone gain. And yes, it does say H.E.A.R.S. rather than EARS.
I use the included USB cable for the connection between my computer and the EARS device.

DAC and Amplifier Requirements

In order to make a measurement, you must use a stand-alone, high-quality DAC and amplifier to generate tones and to calibrate the miniDSP EARS. I’m using an iFi iDSD Nano connected via USB to an older 2012 MacBook Pro. The Nano is a basic, but clean and reasonably competent device that will power most headphones properly.

My trusty, old, well-loved, and much used iFi iDSD Nano, now serving as the DAC and headphone amplifier for EARS measurements.
The DAC and amplifier are not included with the miniDSP EARS (nor is a computer) and the user must provide their own to complete measurements. Users must use the same device for all their measurements and ideally a similar device to other users to compare measurements. Do not use the typically noisy and underpowered headphone jack in the computer itself.

I would suggest using an amplifier with a hardware volume control. The process requires calibrating the output for every pair of headphones measured. This must be done by adjusting the volume to a set output level, headphone calibration Archives, which requires more or less amplification depending on the sensitivity and impedance of the headphones being measured. An external knob simplifies the process and allows for some fine-tuning.

Computer Setup

Two things must be set on your computer before proceeding with measurements. Firstly, the sample rate of the DAC must be set to 48 kHz. This is the rate that the EARS is expecting, headphone calibration Archives. Headphone calibration Archives, the input gain of the EARS must be set to 0 dB.

Set the Format: to 48,000 Hz in the Midi Audio Setup app in Apple OS.

Both the Sample Rate and input gain are modified in the MIDI Audio Setup app in Apple OS and in the Sound Control Panel Properties – Levels tab in Windows.

Adjust the EARS to 0dB gain in the Midi Audio Setup app in Apple OS.

REW Software Setup

Room EQ Wizard Software

The fantastic headphone calibration Archives free Room EQ Wizard (REW) software is the heart of the measurement process. I selected version 5.15 of REW to best match the current EARS documentation. The 5.15 version is available for download from here.

In general, follow the recommended settings for REW in the miniDSP EARS instructions. This document isn’t intended as a replacement for the included instructions, rather as a summary companion.

Determine SPL Calibration Target

The top of all the calibration files shows the Sens Factor and Sensitive Side for your particular EARS.

Write down the Sensitivity Factor (Sens Factor)and Sensitive Channel (sensitive side) of your specific Headphone calibration Archives device. This information is found at the top of the calibration files. For example, headphone calibration Archives, my EARS sensitivity factor and sensitive channel are:

All the calibration files must be downloaded and saved from the miniDSP EARS website (Unique Calibration File Download section) by entering the serial number for your EARS.

Use the sensitivity factor to determine the SPL Calibration Targets for headphones and IEMs. For headphones, this is -40 + sensitivity factor. For IEMs, this is -30 + sensitivity factor. For example, the SPL Calibration Targets for my ears are:

  • Headphones: (-40 + -1.1 =) headphone calibration Archives -31.1

These values will be used on the REW SPL Meter window.

REW Preferences

Press the Preferences button on the REW toolbar.

The Soundcard tab in REW Preferences.

In the Soundcard tab in REW Preferences, set the following:

  • Sample Rate: 48 kHz
  • Output Device: Your DAC/Amp
  • Input Device: E.A.R.S Gain 18 dB
  • Output: Default Output – Choose your Sensitive Channel (for my EARS this is RIGHT)
  • Input: Default Input – Choose your Sensitive Channel (for my EARS this is RIGHT)
  • Sweep Level: -20 dBFS

Mic/Meter Tab

The Mic/Meter tab in REW Preferences.
  • Mic or Z weighted SPL meter: selected
  • Calibration File: Select the downloaded calibration file for your EARS. Select L or R (left or right) depending on the channel being measured.
  • IEMs: IDF (for my EARS this is: R_IDF_8602316.txt)
  • Headphones: HPN (for my EARS this is: R_HPN_8602316.txt)

To keep things organized, I saved the calibration files in the folder format:

  • miniDSP EARS Files/Calibration Files – 860-2316/HPN Headphone Measurement Compensation/
  • miniDSP EARS Files/Calibration Files – 860-2316/IDF IEM Diffuse-Field Compensation/

Calibration Files

miniDSP provides 4 different types headphone calibration Archives calibration files for the EARS. One is RAW (minimal compensation), one is for IEM measurement (IDF), and there are two for headphones (HEC and HPN).

For simplicity’s sake, we will perform measurements using the IDF files for IEMs and the HPN files for headphones. The appropriate file must be loaded into REW before running a measurement.

There are Left (L) and Right (R) files for each compensation.
The HPN and IDF calibration files.

The calibration files serve three purposes:

1. Correct the frequency response between the individual (left and right) microphone capsules.

2. Correct for any SPL sensitivity difference between the left and right capsules.

3. To apply a compensation so that the produced measurement is more easily and usefully interpreted.

The calibration files provide compensation for the particular characteristics of the measurement rig, and there are ongoing debates and discussions as to what is the ‘right’ compensation to use. All measurement devices typically use some type of compensation.

“The EARS is not an IEEE-standard ear simulator (those are very expensive). So, its compensations need to be different from those used with expensive measurement rigs (or published in research papers).” – EARS User Manual

The four different calibration files types are:

1. IDF headphone calibration Archives IEM Diffuse Field Compensation headphone calibration Archives Based on the Etymotic ER4SR.

2. HPH – Headphone Measurement Compensation – Intended as a basis for headphone measurements.

3. HEQ – Headphone EQ Compensation – Intended as a basis for subsequent headphone EQ changes.

4. RAW – The raw measured response calibrated for the microphone capsules.

Although miniDSP suggests using the HEC compensation rather than the HPN, I find the HPN results to be more comparable to other respected publications such as Inner Fidelity.

View Tab

  • Full scale sine rms is 0 dBFS: headphone calibration Archives (off).

SPL Calibration

Each time a new pair of headphones (or IEMs) are being measured, the sound pressure level (SPL) must be calibrated.

The REW Generator and SPL Meter windows. Calibration is being done for a pair of headphones to match <b>headphone calibration Archives</b> target of -41.1.

REW Generator Window

  1. Press windows 10 lite activation key Archives - Windows Activator Generator button on the REW toolbar.
    • Output: Sine Wave
    • RMS Level dBFS: -20.0
    • Frequency: 300 Hz
  2. Press the green PLAY button to start.

REW SPL Meter Window

  1. Press the SPL button on the REW toolbar.
  2. Press the lower right red button to power on the meter. Slowly increase the volume on your headphone amplifier until the dBFS meter in the center reads the SPL Calibration Target you determined in the first step. The SPL Calibration Targets for my WinISO 6.4.1 Registration Code + Serial Key Crack Download 2021 are:
    • Headphones: -41.1
    • IEMs: -31.1
. It headphone calibration Archives not be possible to get the dBFS meter to stop exactly on your SPL Calibration Target, so just get it as close as you can.
Set Headphones to 84 and IEMs to 94 on the SPL Calibration window.
  1. Press the Calibrate button. Adjust the SPL figure in the box to:
  2. Press the Finished button.
The SPL calibration has been completed. Ready to take some measurements!

Performing Measurements

  1. Press the Measurement button in the REW toolbar.
    • Start Freq: 20
    • End Freq: 20,000
    • Level: -20.0
    • Output: Default Output: Right
  2. Press the Start Measuring button.

The measurement process only takes a few seconds to complete. The first frequency response graph will be displayed.

Making a measurement.

Repositioning the headphones and running a headphone calibration Archives of 5 measurements per channel is necessary to identify and remove abnormal or outlier measurements. 5 valid measurements can then be averaged for a relatively accurate side measurement (left or right graph).

These 10 valid measurements can be averaged for a relatively accurate L+R graph.

Measuring the Other Channel

Preferences Window

Soundcard Tab
  • Output: Default Output: SELECT THE OTHER CHANNEL
  • Input: Default Input: SELECT THE OTHER CHANNEL
Mic/Meter Tab
  • File: SELECT APPROPRIATE CALIBRATION FILE FOR THE OTHER CHANNEL

Frequency Response Graph

This is where the measurement results are displayed. It’s the most common and useful graph we have to compare how the headphones sound. Start by setting several adobe cs3 master collection for all measurements:

  • Use the Limits button to set the graph to display 20-20,000 Hz on the x-axis and 50-100 dB on the y-axis.
  • Select the All SPL tab headphone calibration Archives the graph.
  • After each measurement, from the Graph dropdown menu select: Apply 1/12 smoothing. This smooths the line using 1/12 octave smoothing.

After smoothing, save each measurement in the format:

  • HEADPHONE NAME – SIDE MEASUREMENT NUMBER. For example: “HD650 L1.mdat
The SPL graph is displayed after <b>headphone calibration Archives</b> a measurement. Set the appropriate axis values and 1/12 octave smoothing.

Physically reposition the headphone on the EARS measurement rig. This may be done by entirely removing the headphones and placing them on again, or by rotating or sliding the headphones around on the EARS. Try to position them naturally over the silicone ears while maintaining a good seal with the ear pads.

Perform another measurement as outlined above, headphone calibration Archives. Discard any erroneous measurement that is clearly headphone calibration Archives. Repeat until you have created 5 valid measurements for each side.

The impact of a bad seal between the headphone earpads and the EARS is seen in the pink line. Bass and treble response are significantly curtailed and out of line with the better (green and blue) headphone position measurements.
The most obvious measurement issue is created when there is a lack of seal between the earpads headphone calibration Archives IEMear tips) and the EARS. The bass response will be severely curtailed and will drop off headphone calibration Archives the Average the Responses button at the bottom of the graph to create an average of all the measurements currently displayed in the All SPL tab. You can Open or Close measurements as appropriate to finally save a file as:

  • HEADPHONE NAME – Avg – SIDE. For example: “HD650 Avg L.mdat

The Capture button at the top is used to create a picture of the graph that can be used to post online.

  • Image Width: 2000
  • Include Title: checked
  • Include Legend: checked
  • JPEG image: checked
  • Type any additional text here: Title of Graph. For example: “HD650 – Headphonesty”

Summary of Settings and Best Practices

  • Measurements must be completed in a silent room.
  • The user must provide a headphone calibration Archives DAC and headphone amplifier able to properly power the headphones being measured. This device should be the same for all headphones being measured.
  • Use a single version of REW software, headphone calibration Archives. I use v5.15 so that it matches the version in the miniDSP instructions.
  • Use the sensitivity factor in a calibration file to determine the specific SPL Calibration Target for your EARS and the Sensitive Channel. Headphones: -40 + sensitivity factor. IEMs: -30 + sensitivity factor. Write these down.
  • Use the SPL Calibration Target to configure REW using the Generator window and SPL Meter for each pair of headphones or IEMs measured. Calibrate to 84 for headphones and 94 for IEMs.
  • Sample Rate: 48 kHz
  • Sweep Level: -20 dBFS
  • Gain Setting: 18 dB
  • Measurement Start: 20 Hz End: 20000 Hz
  • Use the Calibrated HPN (L or R) files provided by miniDSP for the particular EARS rig (based on serial number) for measuring Headphones.
  • Use the Calibrated IDF (L or R) files provided by miniDSP for the particular EARS rig (based on serial number) for measuring IEMs.
  • Default graph settings: Frequency: 20 Hz – 20 kHz. SPL Range: 50-100 dB. Octave Smoothing: 1/12
  • Repositioning the headphones and running a minimum of 5 measurements per channel is necessary to identify and remove abnormal or outlier measurements, headphone calibration Archives. 5 valid measurements can then be averaged for a relatively accurate side measurement (left or right side graph).

Conclusion

As an additional resource, I have posted a couple of videos of the above process to YouTube.

Videos:

  1. Part 1: I confirm headphone calibration Archives the necessary settings and measure the right channel of the Sennheiser HD518. Five measurements are completed and averaged.
  2. Part 2: I measure the left channel and average all the results.

While not perfect, the miniDSP can be a useful tool in comparing the relative performance of headphones and IEMs. The crucial step is to ensure that these measurements are being done as consistently as possible across all headphones being measured and across all miniDSP EARS users.

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