How to Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio - HomeStudioToday

Sonarworks calibration Archives

sonarworks calibration Archives

If the manufacturer of your measurement mic doesn't provide calibration files, you can still build a monitor calibration profile with Reference 4 Measure, but. To do so, you will need to convert your calibration file so our measurement software can import it. Calibration files are usually supplied in formats like. However, I did some objective analysis and compared the Sonarworks calibration of the s with the calibrated sound of my studio monitors.

Sonarworks calibration Archives - phrase

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If you&#;re like most home producers, you bought studio monitors to get a quality sound out of your DAW to help with mixing and mastering your tracks. Monitors inevitably have a flatter frequency response than headphones and give a far better perspective as to what your published tracks will sound like in the real world. Monitors, however, are just one piece in the puzzle when putting together a good master. In addition to quality monitors, you&#;ll also need acoustic treatment and calibration to get a perfectly balanced and flat frequency response in any studio environment. That&#;s where calibration software like Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio comes in.

(For this tutorial, you&#;ll need Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio and either the Sonarworks XREF 20 mic or another room measurement mic like the Dayton EMM-6 or the EarthWorks M If you don&#;t already own Reference 4, check out my complete review of Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio here.)

Why Do I Need Calibration?

When you play your tracks through your studio monitors, the sound waves don&#;t just come out to your ears and stop &#; they keep going past your head and hit the walls, floors, and objects in the room. When those sound waves hit those surfaces, some of them reflect back to your ears and inevitably color the sound that you hear. Left uncalibrated, your room will trick you into setting EQ curves in your mixes to compensate, which throws off the balance of your master. If you&#;ve ever mastered a track that you&#;re really proud of only to play it back elsewhere and hear a harsh, muddy, or tinny mess, you&#;re probably a victim of poor calibration.

There is no such thing as an acoustically perfect space. You can add acoustic treatment, bass traps, soundproofing, and everything else under the sun, but your listening environment will always have some frequencies that ring or echo too loudly and others that cancel out or are &#;trapped&#; by the empty space in your room. When you mix and master your tracks, those peaks and valleys in the perceived sound will inevitably color your tracks. That&#;s why when you play a track that you created somewhere else it sounds so differently &#; it&#;s not just the difference in the speakers, it&#;s the variation in room acoustics. The goal with calibration is to compensate for those variations and make the sound coming out of your monitors as close to flat as possible, giving you true monitoring of your tracks while you mix and master and ultimately translating into better balance in your published tracks.

Let&#;s go through the process of calibrating your studio monitors step by step:

Step 1 &#; Install Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio and open Reference 4 Measure

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference install

After downloading the Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio installer, run it, and choose Studio edition. This installs everything you need for measuring and applying calibration to both your studio monitors and your headphones, including:

  1. Reference 4 Systemwide &#; An application that runs in the background on your computer and applies calibration to all of the sounds coming out of your monitors and headphones. This can be left running all the time, or you can turn it off when you&#;re not making music to save on CPU usage.
  2. Reference 4 DAW Plugin &#; A VST, AAX, RTAS, or AU plugin that is inserted at the end of your effects chain &#; typically as the last effect on your master buss &#; that is enabled during mixing and mastering to apply calibration to the sound coming out of your DAW. The DAW plugin is then disabled before exporting/bouncing the track for distribution. (If you&#;re running Reference 4 Systemwide, you don&#;t need to also run the DAW Plugin, and vice versa.)
  3. Reference 4 Measure &#; The monitor measurement and calibration software, which walks you step-by-step through building a calibration profile for your studio monitors to use in Reference 4 Systemwide or DAW Plugin.

After the installation is complete, it&#;s time to open Reference 4 Measure and start building your profile:

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 1

Click &#;Measure Your Speakers&#; to start the process. You&#;ll need about 20 minutes and your calibration microphone.

Step 2 &#; Follow the Setup Checklist

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 2

The setup checklist walks you through setting up your calibration mic and audio interface to complete the calibration profile. The steps are:

  1. Plug in the measurement mic and turn on phantom power. For the sake of simplicity in the next step, I recommend plugging it into the first input on your interface. You&#;ll also want to make sure you have it set to mic/line and not instrument, and disable any pad.
  2. Turn the direct monitoring on your interface OFF. This prevents the mic from feeding back through your monitors, which will taint the calibration profile and can possibly damage the mic, monitors, or both. For most interfaces, the direct monitoring knob is turned all the way to the right to enable only output and no direct monitoring. You can tell it&#;s done correctly if you talk into the mic and don&#;t hear anything through your monitors but see the signal/clip lights flash as you talk.
  3. Make sure that you&#;re using the same interface for the mic input and monitor output. For most people, this is not an issue, but if you have more than one interface you should make sure you&#;re using a single interface for your monitor calibration profile, as using multiple interfaces won&#;t always work correctly.
  4. Set your audio interface&#;s sample rate to exactly kHz. Some audio interfaces will automatically adjust to the sample rate of the software, while others will require adjustment in the interface&#;s control panel. Consult the manual for your interface if you&#;re not sure how to set the sample rate.

Step 3 &#; Select Your Measurement Mic and Measurement Profile

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 3

If you bought a Sonarworks XREF 20 Measurement Mic, select that option and enter the microphone&#;s ID found on the body of the mic. This will load a calibration profile for the mic automatically, and you&#;re ready to head to step 4. If you are using a different measurement miclike the Dayton EMM-6 or the EarthWorks M23, you&#;ll want to select &#;Different measurement microphone&#; and proceed to the next screen. Locate the mic calibration profile for your mic on your computer&#;s hard drive and load it into Reference 4.

If you don&#;t have the calibration file for your mic, you can typically download it from the manufacturer&#;s website. If the manufacturer of your measurement mic doesn&#;t provide calibration files, you can still build a monitor calibration profile with Reference 4 Measure, but understand that your final calibration will be off.

How far off depends on the mic. Without a calibration profile, Reference 4 Measure will assume a perfectly flat response, which will never be the case due to the tiny variations in frequency response for even the most expensive calibration mics. If at all possible, you should purchase a mic that has a calibration file, as going without can possibly skew your results, but any calibration will certainly be better than no calibration at all.

Step 4 &#; Select Your Input and Output Device

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 4

Next you&#;ll need to select the correct input and output from your interface. In the drop-downs, locate your interface, then the correct input you plugged the mic into on the list on the left. Then, find the correct output for your interface on the right. Once you&#;ve located both, tap on the mic to make sure that the meter on the screen moves, but that you don&#;t hear it through the speakers. (If you do hear the mic, stop and make sure that your direct monitoring is completely disabled before you proceed. Consult your interface&#;s manual for instructions on how to adjust or disable direct monitoring if you&#;re not sure how.)

Finally, playback the test track and adjust your monitor volume until it comes out at a normal conversation level. (Yes, a normal conversation level. Not loud-mouthed like you. Just kidding.)

Step 5 &#; Adjust Microphone Gain

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 5

Before we can actually calibrate, we need to make sure the mic is receiving a good, strong signal, but isn&#;t clipping. To do that, we&#;ll set the mic&#;s input gain. Reference 4 Measure will play a series of chirpy frequency sweeps through your monitors to gauge how much sound is captured by the mic. Reference 4 Measure will walk you through positioning the mic correctly to get an accurate measurement.

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 5b

You&#;ll want to place the microphone exactly where your head usually is when sitting at your desk. For most, that means moving their chair out of the way and standing up between the speakers. You&#;ll want to ensure that both the distance between and away from the speakers are correct, as well as the height. If you have a wireless keyboard and mouse, now is the time to break those out, as you&#;ll want to hold the mic as steady as possible for all of the measurement steps.

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 5d

Once you&#;re in position, hit &#;Start Measuring.&#; A 5-second timer will count down, then the chirps will start playing. Adjust the mic input until the green bar gets to and stays in the thumbs-up butter zone. Once Reference 4 Measure detects that your gain is set properly, it will play several full sweeps to make sure your mic&#;s gain isn&#;t too high. If it is, it will have you increase your monitor&#;s output level and repeat the test. Continue this process until Reference 4 Measure gives you the big thumbs up of success.

Step 6 &#; Set Monitor Distance

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 6a

With our gain properly adjusted, we can set distance between the monitors in the software for proper trigonometric calculation. (Sound complicated? Well, it is if you&#;re not a student of physics. Thankfully the software does it for you.) To do that, you&#;ll first measure the volume of each monitor directly at the source by placing the mic less than an inch from the midrange driver. Step out from in between your monitors so the sounds don&#;t reflect off your body, then hit &#;Start Measuring.&#; It will play a series of sweeps, then tell you to go to the other speaker and repeat. Finally, it will have you place the mic at your listening position again and do one more short test, then show you a screen where you can adjust the dimensions that the software calculated.

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 6c

It was honestly a little eerie that the software could tell exactly how far apart my monitors are using nothing but math and physics. (Cue Thomas Dolby shouting &#;SCIENCE!&#;) I went and got a tape measure to double-check, and it was off by less than an inch. Now, one more dimensional measurement and we&#;re ready for calibration.

Step 7 &#; Locate Your Listening Spot

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 7

Reference 4 Measure will now tell you once again to place the mic in the listening position and play a series of sweeps. Afterward, it will bring up the screen above, where you can adjust the distance from your ears to your monitors. Again, after measuring mine was off by less than an inch. After the software was able to tell exactly where I was in space-time, I felt confident moving on to the actual calibration measurements.

Step 8 &#; Listening Area Measurements

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 8

Every step through now has been preparing Sonarworks Reference 4 Measure to do some pretty nifty Jedi mind tricks. Now the actual calibration measurement phase begins, and it&#;s mind-blowingly cool if you&#;re a science nerd like me.

Reference 4 Measure will show a blue circle in a drawing that represents your speakers and carefully measured listening position, then play a series of chirps. Take the microphone, and using the drawing as a map, put it in the place in your room represented by the circle. Once Reference 4 Measure detects that you&#;ve put the mic in the right place, the circle will start to fill, letting you know to stop moving. After the circle fills, Reference 4 Measure starts to play frequency sweeps through your speakers.

See the number in the bottom right corner? That&#;s how many individual calibration points that you have left to find &#; mine started at It sounds like a lot, but measuring all of the points individually allows Reference 4 Measure to find all of the peaks and valleys in frequency that constitute your room&#;s acoustic signature.

Once this has completed, you&#;ll be taken to a screen where you can see the results and save the profile for use.

Step 9 &#; Save Profile and Add Preset in Systemwide and/or DAW Plugin

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 8a

Having successfully completed all of the measurements, you have created a calibration profile that can be used to correct the variations in your listening environment. Name the profile, then hit save and finish.

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 9

Now we&#;ll enable the profile. Click &#;Launch Reference Systemwide&#; to save the preset, which can also be used in the DAW plugin.

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 9a

In the Add Preset dialog, select the profile you just saved, then select your output device. Click &#;Add Preset&#; and you&#;re ready to do some quick A/B testing.

Step 10 &#; A/B Test and Enjoy the Results!

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 10

When you save your preset, Sonarworks Reference 4 Systemwide will enable it automatically. You&#;ll probably want to hear the results and the difference! Find a piece of music that you know well and play it. While it&#;s playing back, hit the big blue power button to turn it on and off a few times and listen for the difference.

Depending on how well your room is acoustically treated, it may be a slight difference, or it may be huge! For me personally, I noticed right away the change in the low frequencies as well as the lower-midrange. Upon review of some of my recent mixes, I found that I was overcompensating for my room by boosting some frequencies while cutting others. With Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio running, I can trust my ears more and know that the masters I produce should translate well to other, less perfect listening environments.

Источник: [arenaqq.us]

Cockos Incorporated Forums > REAPER Forums > REAPER Q&A, Tips, Tricks and Howto > Is Sonarworks really accurate?


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Mr. PC

, PM

So I've been thinking of "EQing my headphones" to get a flat output.

Looking at a couple curves of other peoples measurements (InnerFiedlity the Headphone Guru and Sonarworks the pro headphones calibrators; people who can definitely do this better than me.)

arenaqq.us

arenaqq.us

But there seems to be such a big discrepancy between the curves. Sonarworks claims to be accurate to 3dB with their general calibration curves; meaning that the headphones shouldn't vary more than 3dB from model to model.


Photoshoping the 2 pics to the same scale,

arenaqq.us

They look a little better, but looking at the similarities, only a little boost from HzHz, and a little dip from HzHz

Above 2k the charts seem to be more different than similar, so either

1 - Sonarworks is not very useful
2 - Innerfidelity has bad measurements.

Am I missing something?


Dannii

, PM

I was initially skeptical of Sonarworks but I decided to bite the bullet and try the demo of the full suite last month during their sale.

I'm no stranger to calibration techniques and had previously done my own measurements and calibrations of my studio monitors and was well pleased with the results. It was a big step up from no processing. That's part of the reason I was reluctant to try Sonarworks. I figured it wouldn't really offer much over what I'd already accomplished.

I was wrong! Very wrong! After running the Sonarworks demo, I was quite simply shocked at how well it works. It was the same step above my own calibration as that calibration was over uncalibrated. I purchased the full Reference 4 Studio Edition within MINUTES of setting up the demo!

It is now an essential part of my monitoring chain.


As for the headphone calibration, I recently purchased a pair of Beyerdynamic DT Pro headphones and absolutely love them!
I noticed that there is a calibration setup for that model in Sonarworks so I decided to try it out.
At first, I didn't like it. The whole EQ curve seemed to tilt everything in the direction of more lows and less highs and I thought it sounded dull by comparison. However, I did some objective analysis and compared the Sonarworks calibration of the s with the calibrated sound of my studio monitors and they are remarkably close. I decided to leave the Sonarworks calibration in my headphone monitoring chain and now I love what it does. It actually sounds very accurate and my mixes are translating well everywhere.

So, in summary, I'm a now a Sonarworks convert. It works extremely well.


vanhaze

, PM

Hi ReaDave, many thx for this valuable info !

I never heard of Sonarworks, now i am interested ..!

I checked out their website for this product:
arenaqq.us

I use my Sennheiser HD headphones alot at home, to mix in Reaper.
Do you know how i can find out if this headphone is supported by Reference4 - Headphone Edition ?

Warm Regards !


JHughes

, PM

The Sonarworks Headphone EQ for my HDs sounded phasey to me, I couldn't take it. I don't want my monitoring chain to blur focus.


vanhaze

, PM

Mmmm.. that sounds not good.. thx for the info !


JHughes

, PM

NP, something to pay attention to during the demo period anyway. What I heard doesn't seem to bother many.


vanhaze

, PM

- Good to know i can run first a demo version, so i can try it out.
- Ahum, but i consider myself as a good longstanding soundengineer with excellent hearing for detail, so i am assuming i would hear the same phasey/washy issue as you describe.

Let's find out. :)


JHughes

, PM

I'm curious to read your results. :)


vanhaze

, PM

I'll keep ya posted, for sure !


vanhaze

, PM

Ok, so installed the demo.
Put Reference 4 Headphones plugin in Reaper's Monitor Chain.
A volume drop of about 6db so i had to compensate that with a gain plugin to level match it as good as possible when doing AB test.

Honestly i did AB for a minute or so and can't hear that much of a difference ..
I don't really experience a phasey/washy sound when Reference 4 is enabled.
With the plugin enabled, the sound seems abit less "busy" , as if details come alittle bit more to the front.
Hard to tell really, maybe my Sennheiser headphone is quite natural/accurate by itself already ..


JHughes

, PM

Thanks for your report.

I must clarify though, when I say phasey, I don't mean phasing, so it's not like I heard any movement in the sound LOL. I just mean that the placement of instruments in the stereo field seemed a little less solid.

I forget if the software lets you choose between different EQ types, I seem to remember linear phase was used. I'll try again some day though.


Mr. PC

, PM

The Senn s and s are supposed to be pretty accurate, so that could be it.


Also, there should be no phase issues places on the master track. Linear phase could add some pre-ring, but using it at minimum phase really shouldn't make any difference; it's just an EQ curve, right?


Dannii

, AM

It is possible that if the response at the mix position is not compensated correctly for each channel that the image could end up smeared.
In my case though, Sonarworks fixed some minor imaging problems I had. My room is reasonably symmetrical but the roof is slightly lower on the right hand side. I also have different objects on each side of my mix position that slightly affect the response due to the very minor reflections they present.
One of the improvements Sonarworks made here was to compensate correctly for those differences. The resultant EQ curves are actually slightly different between channels which is exactly what I'd expect.


JHughes

, AM

The Senn s and s are supposed to be pretty accurate, so that could be it.


Also, there should be no phase issues places on the master track. Linear phase could add some pre-ring, but using it at minimum phase really shouldn't make any difference; it's just an EQ curve, right?Well, any EQ will change phase somehow, that's why you might use say a Baxendall in one place and a linear phase somewhere else.

If I had used the app on speakers rather than headphones maybe I wouldn't be able to hear the diff.

Also the most important thing is mix translation and that I did not test, whereas I'm sure Dave has.


Mr. PC

, AM

It is possible that if the response at the mix position is not compensated correctly for each channel that the image could end up smeared.
In my case though, Sonarworks fixed some minor imaging problems I had. My room is reasonably symmetrical but the roof is slightly lower on the right hand side. I also have different objects on each side of my mix position that slightly affect the response due to the very minor reflections they present.
One of the improvements Sonarworks made here was to compensate correctly for those differences. The resultant EQ curves are actually slightly different between channels which is exactly what I'd expect.

Oh, I didn't realize Sonarworks processed each channel separate. Is that true of the headphone plugin as well?

In this case linear phase I guess would be the best option. I would do a 'with' and 'without' Sonarworks monitor.


RedStone

, AM

I've been using reference 3 (and now 4) for about a year now. I did notice what I think is a bit of crossfeed, which is where I think the reduction in width is coming from. This would be normal for listening on speakers, so I don't view it as a bad thing.

Listening in Mono is where you can really hear the difference. My Beyerdynamic cans have a horrible boost at 10khz. I can't listen to them for very long now without calibration enabled since I've noticed that boost.

The calibration for headphones won't be % accurate, as each set of headphones (Even of the same make) can be slightly different due to slight manufacturing inconsistencies. Plus there seems to be a breaking-in period for speakers and headphones, so response curves will change somewhat over time. I'm not sure if any of that is enough to worry about or not. I find the stock curves "good enough" when combined with some good cans as well as a calibrated speaker system in a calibrated room for reference.

I use reference in linear phase mode to avoid any phase problems, and I also use the 'avoid clipping' option since the plugin may be boosting some frequency ranges quite a bit in order to achieve a flat response (or a flatter response as the case may be). When A/Bing, I just turn off calibration from within the plugin, and the signal is allowed to pass through uncalibrated.

If you want to do a truer bypass, try using something like AB_LM so the before and after are precisely the same volume.


RedStone

, AM

To split the hairs a little more, to achieve a truly "flat" response you would also need to know the response curve of your ears. So imho there are no attainable absolutes here except for:


take care of your ears by not listening for long periods at decibels SPL above This includes on speakers or cans.
Find the sweet spot between what you've got now and significantly improved.
Chasing perfection is a fool's errand. Keep building on what you've got, and keep moving forward. Eventually you'll look back and realize you've come a really long way!
Physics always wins. Lack of knowledge about the physics of sound is a barrier to progress.


Most headphones at max volume have an SPL rating of over dB. This will begin to kill your ears in minutes! I did some testing on my macbook and found that at max volume, my sony headphones pump out DbSPL. That gives me about 30 seconds before damage occurs to my hearing. Keeping my Macbook volume at 1 'tick' below half way is the sweet spot for longer term listening (even then, it only gives me 2 hours max per day before damage sets in).

Continuous exposures at and above 85dB SPL are considered hazardous by the CDC. And for every 3db SPL of change, that time gets either cut in half or doubled. So at 88dB, you get 4hours. At 91dB, you get 2 hours. at 94dB, 1 hr etc before damage can occur. Running most headphones even at 3/4 max volume will damage your hearing in less than 1 hour. Then that really screws up the search for "flat monitoring"


Dannii

, PM

I should add that I'm also using Sonarworks in linear phase mode except for when playing VST instruments (when I need the lowest latency).

Oh, I didn't realize Sonarworks processed each channel separate. Is that true of the headphone plugin as well?

In this case linear phase I guess would be the best option. I would do a 'with' and 'without' Sonarworks monitor.

Headphones should have the same EQ on both channels because they are not affected by the room. Speaker calibration does each speaker individually to improve channel balance and imaging due to room influence.


Dannii

, PM

Also the most important thing is mix translation and that I did not test, whereas I'm sure Dave has.

Absolutely. This is a game changer in that regard too for me. I'm actually listening to my DTs through Sonarworks right now as I type this.
I've been A/Bing monitors vs headphones with Sonarworks on both and they are VERY close here which is a very good thing.

I've also set up an Ambisonic headphone decode chain using Blue Ripple, ATK and Sonarworks and I can get a reasonable 3D sound field happening with headphones which I'm quite happy about.


ericzang

, AM

I've also set up an Ambisonic headphone decode chain using Blue Ripple, ATK and Sonarworks and I can get a reasonable 3D sound field happening with headphones which I'm quite happy about.

Are you referring to what you describe in your thread (in your signature)? ReaDave Headphone Monitoring FX Chain and Track Template

Or something in addition to that? Sounds interesting!


metal_priest

, AM

i'm trying the demo in these days too (as I just moved to a new house and i'm setting up my arenaqq.usng some bass trap and schroeder diffusortake about this in another future topic if i will remember to take pics, it might be helpful for other people).

I'm impressed too about this software, and i'm wondering to buy it when the demo will be espired.

I make a very extreme test on my un-treated room, just the desk, some shells full of books nothing elsereally extreme.
And, what the f**k?
I couldn't believe to my arenaqq.us course nothing good to work with because the acoustic is too much bad right now, but i could work on a couple of minor jobs without that annoying boomy soundif it was way better with this extreme situation, I really guess that once i'll be done with the treatment work it will be part of my monitoring chain for sure.

I didn't try with my MDR, i will let you know


Dannii

, PM

Are you referring to what you describe in your thread (in your signature)? ReaDave Headphone Monitoring FX Chain and Track Template

Or something in addition to that? Sounds interesting!

The version I am using which includes Sonarworks and Blue Ripple is a variation on the templates in that topic.


So I see some of you have used the demo to check your speakers and room out. Certainly they don't include a an acoustic measuring microphone with the demo, so how did you folks do this, with your own mics.

I've already got a good mic and don't want to purchase another. :)


Dannii

, PM

So I see some of you have used the demo to check your speakers and room out. Certainly they don't include a an acoustic measuring microphone with the demo, so how did you folks do this, with your own mics.

I've already got a good mic and don't want to purchase another. :)

I purchased this without the measurement mic. You can use any decent measurement mic with it and it allows you to import calibration files for your existing mic.
I used my Behri ECM with its calibration file and it worked really well.


Stella

, PM

I bought a cheap used ECM to demo it, then bought the Sonarworks mic with individual calibration after being impressed by the demo and sold the EMC for the same price I paid for it losing just a few quid on postage.

only an omnidirectional measurment mic will work.


I purchased this without the measurement mic. You can use any decent measurement mic with it and it allows you to import calibration files for your existing mic.
I used my Behri ECM with its calibration file and it worked really well.

Thanks Dave and Yeah, I've got the same mic. May I ask what you paid for Sonarworks?


Dannii

, PM

Thanks Dave and Yeah, I've got the same mic. May I ask what you paid for Sonarworks?

I got it at the end of last year during their half price sale.
Regarding the ECM, that is one of Behringer's early successes. I've had mine for around fifteen years and it has proven itself to be a great reference mic many times over in that period. Honestly, that mic is just as good as many others costing significantly more, especially when used with its calibration file.


Dannii

, PM

Thanks Dave and Yeah, I've got the same mic. May I ask what you paid for Sonarworks?

I forgot to mention that there are two reasons I didn't purchase their reference mic. One is that I doubt the results would be much different to the ECM and two is that if I purchased Sonarworks with the mic, I had no option to pay in US$. I could only pay in Euros and that made the overall price much higher. The Aussie to US dollar is MUCH better than Aussie dollar to Euros. I don't like the Euro very much!


Okay thanks Dave, I think I've seen the price for Sonarworks at about $, maybe if I could get it for half I would be interested. :)

Yeah, I've had my ECM for a little over a year, I've only used it twice, once to calibrate my control room and once just playing around experimenting with Reaper's monitor FX.

I checked all the various acoustic mics out there at the time I bought it and decided that regardless of the price it was plenty good enough. :)


Stella

, PM

They rejigged the way they sell it.
Now if you want speaker calibration you have to buy the complete bundle with headphones and systemwide.

Currently $ once in your cart at AudioDeluxe.

If you hold out for a sale maybe it will be less but I suspect no more half price sales as the bundle is already cheaper than the individual software would have beenalways check a third party site as they usually honour the sale price and add their own extra discounts on top.


They rejigged the way they sell it.
Now if you want speaker calibration you have to buy the complete bundle with headphones and systemwide.

Currently $ once in your cart at AudioDeluxe.

If you hold out for a sale maybe it will be less but I suspect no more half price sales as the bundle is already cheaper than the individual software would have beenalways check a third party site as they usually honour the sale price and add their own extra discounts on top.

Okay, thanks Stella, whats the deal with the demo, do they give you a certain amount of time, or is there another way they apply it.

I'm thinking I wouldn't want to demo it with out having enough time to do it in one shot. Or do they have a way of dealing with is so that you have plenty of time to see if it works?


Dannii

, AM

Okay, thanks Stella, whats the deal with the demo, do they give you a certain amount of time, or is there another way they apply it.

I'm thinking I wouldn't want to demo it with out having enough time to do it in one shot. Or do they have a way of dealing with is so that you have plenty of time to see if it works?

Demo is 21 days. It took me about 21 minutes to decide to make the purchase though!!!
arenaqq.us


Geoff Waddington

, AM

Yup, love the ECM, had one for about 10 ears, might be the best thing Behringer makes :)

As far as using linear phase EQ for compensation in order to avoid phase problems, be careful.

You could actually be CAUSING phase problems by using a linear phase EQ.

A single loudspeaker, a single diaphragm headphone earpiece for instance, is a "minimum phase" device.

This has a rigorous engineering definition.

But what's really important is that as you correct a minimum phase device amplitude response, you ALSO correct the phase response, they are mathematically and sonically linked.

Minimum phase device has an evil twin called "excessive phase".

Excessive phase is commonly found in things like 2 way (or more) loudspeakers, rooms, etc.

Excessve phase has an electronic equivalent, an all pass filter.

Correcting the excessive phase component response is trickier.

As a VERY rough rule of thumb, in room acoustics the peaks tend to be minimum phase, the dips tend to be excessive phase.


Demo is 21 days. It took me about 21 minutes to decide to make the purchase though!!!
arenaqq.us

Okay, thanks again Dave, how did you get the profile for your ECM, my mic doesn't have a profile code, at least not one I can see? :)


Stella

, AM

The ECM don't come with a calibration but there is some generic calibration data available from various sources online and you can make your own file by pasting this into a text file and removing one of the columns.

arenaqq.us

Note I have seen someone who had their mic professionally calibrated say that the generic data was nothing like their data, so it may or may not be an improvement over using it without.


The ECM don't come with a calibration but there is some generic calibration data available from various sources online and you can make your own file by pasting this into a text file and removing one of the columns.

arenaqq.us

Note I have seen someone who had their mic professionally calibrated say that the generic data was nothing like their data, so it may or may not be an improvement over using it without.

Thanks again Stella, but I'm a little confused. They say this:

Open up this file with any text editor and remove anything that is not the values for Frequency Response and Magnitude.

But there is no file? Heh heh, oh well, as you indicate, it might not matter.


cyrano

, AM

The .cal file Behringer offers is for a first generation ECM That's the one with the Panasonic WM61a clone capsule produced in the Philippines. There are at least four other OEM's who have produced this mic for Behringer.


Stella

, PM

Thanks again Stella, but I'm a little confused. They say this:

But there is no file? Heh heh, oh well, as you indicate, it might not matter.

The file is at Behringer sitebut yeah, I don't think you can necessarily assume it will make things any better. this uncertainty was why I ended up just buying the Sonarowrks mic which has been individually calibrated by them.

arenaqq.us


The file is at Behringer sitebut yeah, I don't think you can necessarily assume it will make things any better. this uncertainty was why I ended up just buying the Sonarowrks mic which has been individually calibrated by them.

arenaqq.us

Okay thanks Stella, I created a text file that should work, it's based on the link you provided. If anybody else wants it you can DL it here.

arenaqq.us%%arenaqq.us


Dannii

, PM

The .cal file Behringer offers is for a first generation ECM That's the one with the Panasonic WM61a clone capsule produced in the Philippines. There are at least four other OEM's who have produced this mic for Behringer.

I didn't know they used capsules with the same specs as the WM61a. My ECM is one of the early production runs that the cal file was written for.
I have a bunch of WM61a capsules here which I'm using to build custom PZM's. Their response isn't the same as the ECM file suggests. Perhaps the clones Behri used have a different response to the Panasonic capsules.


Triode

, PM

Hi Folks

I'm just trying Sonarworks out with my monitors.
When the Sonarworks plugin is used in the monitor FX chain in reaper it doesn't function (there's no level showing in the plugin metering). When I put it on the master bus it works. Have any of you got it working in the monitor FX chain and was there a trick to that?

Cheers


Hi Folks

I'm just trying Sonarworks out with my monitors.
When the Sonarworks plugin is used in the monitor FX chain in reaper it doesn't function (there's no level showing in the plugin metering). When I put it on the master bus it works. Have any of you got it working in the monitor FX chain and was there a trick to that?

Cheers

Hi Triode, yes I do have it in my "Monitor" FX, it's working very nicely. I've also got it working well outside of Reaper using "Systemwide", another Sonarworks plugin.

It's been a while so I don't recall the exact procedures.


Triode

, AM

Thanks Tod.

It was the pin thing. My interface outs are number 17 and I needed to open the pin dialog and click on the plus sign and add the relevant pins. Stumped me before and I forgot it was necessary for every plugin there.

I set Sonarworks up last night using a U87 and even though I imported a general calibration file I'm not sold yet listening to various frequencies on an oscillator. I think the mic that comes with the software might be necessary. Hmmn


RedStone

, PM

Yes you need to use a proper calibration microphone with a calibration file to set up sonarworks for using it for monitoring with speakers.


I set Sonarworks up last night using a U87 and even though I imported a general calibration file I'm not sold yet listening to various frequencies on an oscillator. I think the mic that comes with the software might be necessary. Hmmn

I've got a Behringer ECM acoustic measurement microphone. I got it at Sweetwater, I see they're about $60 right now. I've noticed quite a few other people have it and I think it's okay for this.

I also see the Sonarworks microphone is about $70 right now.

I think there's a calibration file out there for the ECM, but I measured without it and got reasonable results.


Stella

, AM

I think there's a calibration file out there for the ECM, but I measured without it and got reasonable results.

Well it's not so much out there as right here you posted yours last year after being pointed at the data! It's just a bit further up the thread.
The problems with it are also discussed.


Well it's not so much out there as right here you posted yours last year after being pointed at the data! It's just a bit further up the thread.
The problems with it are also discussed.

Thanks Stella, yeah but I wonder if there isn't something more recent?


Dannii

, AM

The cal file I used for my ECM is the one linked to earlier in this thread. It works perfectly here.


Stella

, AM

Thanks Stella, yeah but I wonder if there isn't something more recent?

The data you created it from has not been updated since so I guess still considered current by Behringer.

arenaqq.us

Howeverthis statement pretty much sums up my own concerns and the reason I went for the xref20 in the end.

arenaqq.us


Howeverthis statement pretty much sums up my own concerns and the reason I went for the xref20 in the end.

arenaqq.us

Aah, I hadn't seen that before, it looks like that was published in

When I got mine I went over it pretty thoroughly with Sweetwater regarding how well they worked. I'm sure they were tempted to sell me a more expensive mic, but when I pressed them, they assured me the ECM would do the job.

The only problem I've had is the mic clip broke, but I've got a lot of assorted mic clips, so it's no problem.


dub

, PM

Just a note to say that I also use Sonarworks in a room with a fair bit of treatment (full-height traps, diffusers) and it made a great, measurable difference.

Only complaint is something I have already requested as a feature - the tray icon needs to indicate if it is in speaker or headphone mode. A few times I've been wondering why everything sounds awful before realising I have headphone correction mode on while monitoring through speakers. But otherwise, it's great.


Dannii

, PM

Howeverthis statement pretty much sums up my own concerns and the reason I went for the xref20 in the end.

arenaqq.us

Hmm.. Very interesting. It seems the ECM is somewhat of an anomaly for Behringer. As a general rule, their quality has improved by leaps and bounds of recent years. However, the early ECM mics have proven to be very reliable. If the new ones are not up to par, that goes against the grain for Behringer.
As far as I can tell, my ECM still works as good as the day I got it back at the start of the s.


cyrano

, AM

I'm afraid it's true, Dave.

The first generation ECM had WM61a capsules and a transformer.

The second generation ECM had WM61a capsules and no transformer.

The third generation ECM had clone capsules, made in the Philippines.

The fourth generation ECM had clone capsules, made in the Philippines and an SMD board.

Apparently, there's a fifth generation now. And problems with consistent electret quality.

Besides, there's a design error in all of them. It's not a balanced mic, because of a wiring error. Correcting that yields a 6 dB higher signal output.

Atm, look at the Mini-DSP UMIK

arenaqq.us

And, yes, it's a USB mic. BUT it's individually calibrated! and it's only 75$.


Dannii

, AM

Thanks Cyrano. You learn something every day so they say.
I'll have to open mine up and check out which version it is. I'm going to guess it is a WM61a model without transformer. It came with the Ultracurve which I mostly use as a spectrum analyzer these days.


cyrano

, PM

Seems like a good guess, Dave. I never could lay my greasy hands on one of the transformer ones. Seems these are rare. I do have one of all the other generations. Only one used for acoustic measurement. The others are noise pickups, used for testing cabling and shielding. Gostbusters :D


karbomusic

, PM

I'm going to guess it is a WM61a model without transformer.

I just cracked one of mine open (I have 2), they are circa and no transformer so I wonder when they had transformers. Reg panasonic capsules, it looks like WM6x but not exactly so not sure if they ever actually had these. I may take the capsule out to look closer but it is glued in; I'd be tempted to say its a WM6x knockoff. Nice enclosures though, I really should take a couple of those WM61a's we bought in , build new preamps and just rebuild both of them and rebrand as "the karbo". :D


cyrano

, PM

Getting the capsule out unharmed is next to impossible

And here's a pic of the transformer one:

arenaqq.us


Getting the capsule out unharmed is next to impossible

And here's a pic of the transformer one:

arenaqq.us

That's got a totally different looking case, were they that different back then?

I'm totally stuck with mine unless I want to buy another one, but I'm happy with what I ended up with for my room using Sonarworks.

I only shot the room once with Sonarworks, so when I have some time I'm going to do it again to see what happens. :)


karbomusic

, PM

Getting the capsule out unharmed is next to impossible

And here's a pic of the transformer one:



Thanks for the pic. I got it out without much issue. It's bigger than the WM61a. ECM on the right

arenaqq.us

The pre

arenaqq.us


cyrano

, PM

That's got a totally different looking case, were they that different back then?

I'm totally stuck with mine unless I want to buy another one, but I'm happy with what I ended up with for my room using Sonarworks.

I only shot the room once with Sonarworks, so when I have some time I'm going to do it again to see what happens. :)

I only can see a different screw

Mine aren't all the same either. But the differences are minor. Different grille, different screws, XLR's.

Behringer used different OEM's over time for these. The only one I'm sure of, is Phonic, in Taiwan. One of my broken ECM's states "Made in the Phillipines".

The latest one (since ) seems to use the same OEM as the Dayton measurement mic. It's Ohms, the older ones all are Ohms.


cyrano

, PM

Thanks for the pic. I got it out without much issue. It's bigger than the WM61a. ECM on the right

Well, congrats! I never managed to get one out without heating it.

Since yours still has through-hole components, it's one of the earlier. 3rd generation in my list?

And even WM61's aren't too sure. They're still available from reputed sources, but a lot of "fake" ones are around. Maybe even Panasonic made several revisions?

But my list is based on what I've seen. Probably there have been other ECM versions in other markets, or at other moments. These four are the ones I've seen over the years and by dissecting the defective ones I've been given.

The info about the latest one () comes from a GS thread:

arenaqq.us


karbomusic

, PM

Well, congrats! I never managed to get one out without heating it.


Very judicious use of acetone on a Q-Tip.


cyrano

, AM

Very judicious use of acetone on a Q-Tip.

Never tried that. Doesn't acetone damage the capsule?

I mean, acetone vapor is enough to make 3D prints shiny, isn't it?


karbomusic

, AM

Never tried that. Doesn't acetone damage the capsule?

I mean, acetone vapor is enough to make 3D prints shiny, isn't it?

It should be OK unless made of something like ABS but I was careful not to soak the element side. I'll test when I put it back in to make sure it still works.


akademie

, AM

Any way to determine "version" of Behringer ECM microphone without disassembling/breaking it?
For which of them will the supplied calibration data work?

I have two ECM that I want to use to measure my room. They were bought second hand at different times. One of them has CHINA inside the XLR connector, the another one does not :)


cyrano

, AM

Any way to determine "version" of Behringer ECM microphone without disassembling/breaking it?

Nope. AFAIK there's no way. Too many different versions.

For which of them will the supplied calibration data work?

The .cal file is generic. It doesn't apply much calibration, except in the low end.

As these are electret capsules, getting older will probably yield more difference than the individual versions. All the capsules in these are omni and reasonably flat.

And as long as your measurements are relative to other measurements you make with the same mic, it doesn't matter that much.

I have two ECM that I want to use to measure my room. They were bought second hand at different times. One of them has CHINA inside the XLR connector, the another one does not :)

If you start hearing a lot of hiss, they are ripe for replacement.


akademie

, AM

Thanks cyrano,
will do some measurement in spare time and compare those two mics to see what's up.


I ran into this problem of latency and I couldn't figure out why.

I had a client in for the last few days, and every time he tried to play his guitar or sing, there was way to much
latency so I had to use direct monitoring. I just didn't have time to stop and figure out what the problem was.

Then today I got to thinking maybe it's the Sonarworks plugin in the monitor FX, and sure enough, when I turned it
off today the latency went away. Ha ha, I can't believe I didn't figure that out sooner. So I decided to see if
I could set up ReaEQ to mimic Sonarworks.

I set up the tracks and FX like this.

Trk JS White Noise generator (White Noise has less distortion then Pink Noise)
Trk Sonarworks
Trk 2 ReaEQ plugins
Trk Span

Trk-1 is routed to both Trk-2 & Trk-3 while Trk-2 & Trk-3 are rounted to Trk
Trk-2 is sending both left & right to Trk
Trk-3 one ReaEQ goes out left using Pin-1, while the other ReaEQ goes out right using Pin

Span is setup for both Trk-2 & Trk-3, with (Range Lo = )(Range Hi = )(Slope = 0) and a Smoothing of 1/6 Oct.

First I panned Trk-1 full left and setup the left ReaEQ, then panned Trk-1 full right and setup the right ReaEQ.

When I got done, I grouped the "Mutes" on both Trk2 & Trk3, loaded a reference song and routed it to both Trk-2 & Trk3.

While playing the reference I flipped back and forth between Sonarworks and ReaEQ. They sounded very very similar, ReaEQ
had slightly more in the mid range and Sonarworks had slightly more in the low end.

However, Sonarworks sounded somewhat tight in a way that I could both feel it and hear it. After testing for quite awhile
using other reference songs, I decided I definitely like ReaEQ better. Also I added another stereo ReaEQ and added about
dB of Low Shelving at hz to make up for the lower bottom end.

So I added my ReaEQs to the monitor mix and bypassed Sonarworks. I'm really liking it and the latency is gone. :)


Triode

, PM

Sonarworks does have a zero latency mode. Did you try that too?


Sonarworks does have a zero latency mode. Did you try that too?

Yeah I know, but somewhere I read that Linear Phase was better so that's where I set it and forgot about it.

So to be honest, I did forget about that, so thanks Triode. But I still think I like the ReaEQ better. Ha ha, maybe there was a reason I forgot about the Zero Latency thingy. :)


acintya

, AM

I was initially skeptical of Sonarworks but I decided to bite the bullet and try the demo of the full suite last month during their sale.

I'm no stranger to calibration techniques and had previously done my own measurements and calibrations of my studio monitors and was well pleased with the results. It was a big step up from no processing. That's part of the reason I was reluctant to try Sonarworks. I figured it wouldn't really offer much over what I'd already accomplished.

I was wrong! Very wrong! After running the Sonarworks demo, I was quite simply shocked at how well it works. It was the same step above my own calibration as that calibration was over uncalibrated. I purchased the full Reference 4 Studio Edition within MINUTES of setting up the demo!

It is now an essential part of my monitoring chain.


As for the headphone calibration, I recently purchased a pair of Beyerdynamic DT Pro headphones and absolutely love them!
I noticed that there is a calibration setup for that model in Sonarworks so I decided to try it out.
At first, I didn't like it. The whole EQ curve seemed to tilt everything in the direction of more lows and less highs and I thought it sounded dull by comparison. However, I did some objective analysis and compared the Sonarworks calibration of the s with the calibrated sound of my studio monitors and they are remarkably close. I decided to leave the Sonarworks calibration in my headphone monitoring chain and now I love what it does. It actually sounds very accurate and my mixes are translating well everywhere.

So, in summary, I'm a now a Sonarworks convert. It works extremely well.

great story!! I bought pre-calibrated hds and I cant explain enough how clear are they now - one of the most flat headphones available but when you turn sonarworks on it you experience a whole new level of monitoring.


Dannii

, AM

great story!! I bought pre-calibrated hds and I cant explain enough how clear are they now - one of the most flat headphones available but when you turn sonarworks on it you experience a whole new level of monitoring.

If I didn't end up with the Beyers, I probably would've gone with HDs as well. A good friend who is also fellow musician/engineer has a pair and they are great headphones.

I'll be trying out some experiments using Sonarworks for live engineering use soon. I'm currently putting together a new live rig based on REAPER, an RME Fireface UFX and some Neve clone preamps and am planning to use a few instances of Sonarworks on busses and sends to calibrate both vocal mics and FOH/FB speakers. I'll obviously be using it in zero latency mode which is also the mode I'm running in my studio. I switched to that a few months back and haven't noticed anything detrimental. In fact, if anything, I prefer the sound of that mode.


acintya

, AM

If I didn't end up with the Beyers, I probably would've gone with HDs as well. A good friend who is also fellow musician/engineer has a pair and they are great headphones.

I'll be trying out some experiments using Sonarworks for live engineering use soon. I'm currently putting together a new live rig based on REAPER, an RME Fireface UFX and some Neve clone preamps and am planning to use a few instances of Sonarworks on busses and sends to calibrate both vocal mics and FOH/FB speakers. I'll obviously be using it in zero latency mode which is also the mode I'm running in my studio. I switched to that a few months back and haven't noticed anything detrimental. In fact, if anything, I prefer the sound of that mode.

interesting idea!with you luck man. im a newbie in this area,but i have no idea how i managed to mixdown all my tracks until now without sonarworks - it was false audio image all the way.
my sony headphones also are a lot more clear with this software,not to speak about my yamaha hs80 - now they are really FLAT.
now the mixes translate superb between the sennheisers and yamahas. i think i will not turn off this software ever:)
its not about beeing flat, its also that somehow the audio is more clear you can hear different frequencies better - cant explain.

good luck with the projects!


arenaqq.us

, PM

this signal:

arenaqq.us (arenaqq.us)arenaqq.us (arenaqq.us)


after applying the headphone profile for the DT pro:

arenaqq.us (arenaqq.us)arenaqq.us (arenaqq.us)


zero latency:

arenaqq.us (arenaqq.us)arenaqq.us (arenaqq.us)

The result of the correction is the addition of ringing, loss of space.


JHughes

, AM

The result of the correction is the addition of ringing, loss of arenaqq.us's exactly what I hear too. I trialed Sonarworks but found the downsides outweighed the pluses.


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Источник: [arenaqq.us]

Think, that: Sonarworks calibration Archives

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Sonarworks calibration Archives

If you enjoy this how-to guide and decide to grab one of the items listed, please consider clicking through one of my links before you buy. I earn a small sonarworks calibration Archives at no cost to you, which helps support this site and keep these informative guides coming. Thanks!

If you&#;re like most home producers, you bought studio monitors to get a quality sound out of your DAW to help with mixing and sonarworks calibration Archives your tracks. Monitors inevitably have a flatter frequency response than headphones and give a far better perspective as to what your published tracks will sound like in the real world. Monitors, however, are just one piece in the puzzle when putting together a good master. In addition to quality monitors, you&#;ll also need acoustic treatment and calibration to get a perfectly balanced and flat frequency response in any studio environment. That&#;s where calibration software like Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio comes in.

(For this tutorial, you&#;ll need Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio and either the Sonarworks XREF 20 mic or another room measurement mic like the Dayton EMM-6 or the EarthWorks M If you don&#;t already own Reference 4, check out my complete review of Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio here.)

Why Do I Need Calibration?

When you play your tracks through your studio monitors, the sound waves don&#;t just come out to your ears and stop &#; they keep going past your head and hit the walls, floors, and objects in the room. When those sound waves hit those surfaces, some of them reflect back to your ears and inevitably color the sound that you hear. Left uncalibrated, your room will trick you into setting EQ curves in your mixes to compensate, which throws off the balance of your master, sonarworks calibration Archives. If you&#;ve ever mastered a track that you&#;re really proud of only to play it back elsewhere and hear a harsh, muddy, or tinny mess, you&#;re probably a victim of poor calibration.

There is no such thing as an acoustically perfect space. You can add acoustic treatment, bass traps, soundproofing, and everything else under the sun, but your listening environment will always have some frequencies that ring or echo too loudly and others that cancel out or are &#;trapped&#; by the empty space in your room. When you mix and master your tracks, those peaks and valleys in the perceived sound will inevitably color your tracks. That&#;s why when you play a track that you created somewhere else it sounds so differently &#; it&#;s not just the difference in the speakers, it&#;s the variation in room acoustics. The goal with calibration is to compensate for those variations and make the sound coming out of your monitors as close to flat as possible, giving you true monitoring of your tracks while you mix and master and ultimately translating into better balance in your published tracks.

Let&#;s go through the process of calibrating your studio monitors step by step:

Step 1 &#; Install Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio and open Reference 4 Measure

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference install

After downloading the Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio installer, run it, and choose Studio edition. This installs everything you need for measuring and applying calibration to both your studio monitors and your headphones, including:

  1. Reference 4 Systemwide &#; An application that runs in the background on your computer and applies calibration to all of the sounds coming out of your monitors and headphones. This can be left running all the time, or you can turn it off when you&#;re not making music to save on CPU usage.
  2. Reference 4 DAW Plugin &#; A VST, AAX, RTAS, or AU plugin that is inserted at the end of your effects chain &#; typically as the last effect on your master buss &#; that is enabled during mixing and mastering to apply calibration to the sound coming out of your DAW. The DAW plugin is then disabled before exporting/bouncing the track for distribution. (If you&#;re running Reference 4 Systemwide, you don&#;t need to also run the DAW Plugin, and vice versa.)
  3. Reference 4 Measure &#; The monitor measurement and calibration software, which walks you step-by-step through building a calibration profile for your studio monitors to use in Reference 4 Systemwide or DAW Plugin.

After the installation is complete, it&#;s time to open Reference 4 Measure and start building your profile:

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 1

Click &#;Measure Your Speakers&#; to start the process. You&#;ll need about 20 minutes and your calibration microphone.

Step 2 &#; Follow the Setup Checklist

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 2

The setup checklist walks you through setting up your calibration mic and audio interface to complete the calibration profile, sonarworks calibration Archives. The steps are:

  1. Plug in the measurement mic and turn on phantom power. For the sake of simplicity in the next step, I recommend plugging it into the first input on your interface. You&#;ll sonarworks calibration Archives want to make sure you have it set to mic/line and not instrument, and disable any pad.
  2. Turn the direct monitoring on your interface OFF. This prevents the mic from feeding back through your monitors, which will taint the calibration profile and can possibly damage the mic, monitors, or both. For most interfaces, the direct monitoring knob is turned all the way to the right to enable only output and no direct monitoring. You can tell it&#;s done correctly if you talk into the mic and don&#;t hear Substance Painter Keygen Archives through your monitors but see the signal/clip lights flash as you talk.
  3. Make sure that you&#;re using the same interface for the mic input and monitor output. For most people, this is not an issue, but if you have more than one interface you should make sure you&#;re using a single interface for your monitor calibration profile, as using multiple interfaces won&#;t always work correctly.
  4. Set your audio interface&#;s sample rate to exactly kHz. Some audio interfaces will automatically adjust to the sample rate of the software, while others will require adjustment in the interface&#;s control panel. Consult the manual for your interface if you&#;re not sure how to set the sample rate.

Step 3 &#; Select Your Measurement Mic and Measurement Profile

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 3

If you bought a Sonarworks XREF 20 Measurement Mic, sonarworks calibration Archives, select that option and enter the microphone&#;s ID found on the body of the mic, sonarworks calibration Archives. This will load a calibration profile for the mic automatically, and you&#;re ready to head to step 4. If you are using a different measurement miclike the Sonarworks calibration Archives EMM-6 or the EarthWorks M23, you&#;ll want to select &#;Different measurement microphone&#; and proceed to the next screen. Locate the mic calibration profile for your mic on your computer&#;s hard drive and load it into Reference 4.

If you don&#;t have the calibration file for your mic, you can typically download it from the manufacturer&#;s website. If the manufacturer of your measurement mic doesn&#;t provide calibration files, you can still build a monitor calibration profile with Reference 4 Measure, but understand that your final calibration will be off.

How far off depends on the mic. Without a calibration profile, Reference 4 Measure will assume a perfectly flat response, which will never be the case due to the tiny variations in frequency response for even the most expensive calibration mics. If at all possible, you should purchase a mic that has a calibration file, as going without can possibly skew your results, but any calibration will certainly be better than no calibration at all.

Step 4 &#; Select Your Input and Output Device

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 4

Next you&#;ll need to select the correct input and output from your interface. In the drop-downs, locate your interface, then the correct input you plugged the mic into on the list on the left. Then, find the correct output for your interface on the right. Once you&#;ve located sonarworks calibration Archives, tap on the mic to make sure that the meter on the screen moves, but that you don&#;t hear it through the speakers. (If you do hear the mic, sonarworks calibration Archives, stop and make sure that your direct monitoring is completely disabled before you proceed. Consult your interface&#;s manual for instructions on how to adjust or disable direct monitoring if you&#;re not sure how.)

Finally, playback the test track and adjust your monitor volume until it comes out at a normal conversation level. (Yes, a sonarworks calibration Archives conversation level. Not loud-mouthed like you. Just kidding.)

Step 5 &#; Adjust Microphone Gain

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 5

Before we can actually calibrate, we need to make sure the mic is receiving a good, strong signal, but isn&#;t clipping. To do that, we&#;ll set the mic&#;s input gain. Reference 4 Measure will play a series of chirpy frequency sweeps through your monitors to gauge how much sound is captured by the mic. Reference 4 Measure will walk you through positioning the mic correctly to get an accurate measurement.

How To Calibrate <i>Sonarworks calibration Archives</i> Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 5b

You&#;ll want to place the microphone exactly where your head usually is when sitting at your desk. For most, that means moving their chair out of the way and standing up between the speakers. You&#;ll want to ensure that both the distance between and away from the speakers are correct, as well as the height. If you have a wireless keyboard and mouse, now is the time to break those out, as you&#;ll want ZD Soft Screen Recorder 11.3.0 - March 2021 crack serial keygen hold the mic as steady as possible for all of the measurement steps.

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 5d

Once you&#;re in position, hit &#;Start Measuring.&#; A 5-second timer will count down, then the chirps will start playing. Adjust the mic input until the green bar gets to and stays in the thumbs-up butter zone. Once Reference 4 Measure detects that your gain is set properly, it will play several full sweeps to make sure your mic&#;s gain isn&#;t too high. If it is, it will have you increase your monitor&#;s output level sonarworks calibration Archives repeat the test. Continue this process until Reference 4 Measure gives you the big thumbs up of success.

Step 6 &#; Set Monitor Distance

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 6a

With our gain properly adjusted, sonarworks calibration Archives, we can set distance between the monitors in the software for proper trigonometric calculation. (Sound complicated? Well, it is if you&#;re not a student of physics. Thankfully the software sonarworks calibration Archives it for you.) To do that, you&#;ll first measure the volume of each monitor directly at the source by placing the mic less than an inch from the midrange driver. Step out from in between your monitors so the sounds don&#;t reflect off your body, then hit &#;Start Measuring.&#; It will play a series of sweeps, then tell you to go to the other speaker and repeat. Finally, it will have you place the mic at your listening position again and do one more short test, then show you a screen where you can adjust the dimensions that the software calculated.

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 6c

It was honestly a little eerie that the software could tell exactly how far apart my monitors are using nothing but math and physics. (Cue Thomas Dolby shouting &#;SCIENCE!&#;) I went and got a tape measure to double-check, and it was off by less than an inch. Now, one more dimensional measurement and we&#;re ready for calibration.

Step 7 &#; Locate Your Listening Spot

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks <b>Sonarworks calibration Archives</b> step 7

Reference 4 Measure will now tell you once again to place the mic in the listening position and play a series of sweeps. Afterward, it will bring up the screen above, sonarworks calibration Archives, where you can adjust the Zeta Producer 14 crack serial keygen from your ears to your monitors. Again, after measuring mine was off by less than an inch. After the software was able to tell exactly where I was in space-time, I felt confident moving on to the actual calibration measurements.

Step 8 &#; Listening Area Measurements

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 8

Every step through now has been preparing Sonarworks Reference 4 Measure to do some pretty nifty Jedi mind tricks. Now the actual calibration measurement phase begins, and it&#;s mind-blowingly cool if you&#;re a science nerd like me.

Reference 4 Measure will show a blue circle in a drawing that represents your speakers and carefully measured listening position, then play a series of chirps. Take the microphone, and using the drawing as a map, put it in the place in your room sonarworks calibration Archives by the circle. Once Reference 4 Measure detects that you&#;ve put sonarworks calibration Archives mic in the right place, the circle will start to fill, letting you know to stop moving. After the circle fills, Reference 4 Measure starts to play frequency sweeps through your speakers.

See the number in the bottom right corner? That&#;s how many individual calibration points that you have left to find &#; mine started at It sounds like a lot, but measuring all of the points individually allows Reference 4 Measure to find all of the peaks and valleys in frequency that constitute your room&#;s acoustic signature.

Once this has completed, you&#;ll be taken to a screen where you can see the results and save the profile for use.

Step 9 &#; Save Profile and Add Preset in Systemwide and/or DAW Sonarworks calibration Archives width="" height="" src="arenaqq.us" alt="How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 8a">

Having successfully completed all of the measurements, you have created a calibration profile that can be used to correct the variations in your listening environment. Name the profile, then hit save and finish.

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 9

Now we&#;ll enable the profile. Click &#;Launch Reference Systemwide&#; to save the preset, sonarworks calibration Archives, which can also be used in the DAW plugin.

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 9a

In the Add Preset dialog, sonarworks calibration Archives the profile you just saved, then select your output device. Click &#;Add Preset&#; and you&#;re ready to do some quick A/B testing.

Step 10 &#; A/B Test and Enjoy the Results!

How To Calibrate Your Studio Monitors with Sonarworks Reference step 10

When you save your preset, Sonarworks Reference 4 Systemwide will enable it automatically. You&#;ll probably want to hear the results and the difference! Find a piece of music that you know well and play it. While it&#;s playing back, hit the big blue power button to turn it on and off a few times and listen for the difference.

Depending on how well your room is acoustically treated, it may be a slight difference, or it may be huge! For me personally, I noticed right away the change in the low frequencies as well as the lower-midrange. Upon review of some of my recent mixes, sonarworks calibration Archives, I found that I was overcompensating for my room by boosting some frequencies while cutting others, sonarworks calibration Archives. With Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio running, I can trust my ears more and know that the masters I produce should translate well to other, less perfect listening environments.

Источник: [arenaqq.us]

Cockos Incorporated Forums > REAPER Forums > REAPER Q&A, Tips, Tricks and Howto > Is Sonarworks really accurate?


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Mr. PC

, PM

So I've been thinking of "EQing my headphones" to get a flat output.

Looking at a couple curves of other peoples measurements (InnerFiedlity the Headphone Guru and Sonarworks the pro headphones calibrators; people who can definitely do this better than me.)

arenaqq.us

arenaqq.us

But there seems to be such a big discrepancy between the curves. Sonarworks claims to be accurate to 3dB with their general calibration curves; meaning that the headphones shouldn't vary more than 3dB from model to model.


Photoshoping the 2 pics to the same scale,

arenaqq.us

They look a sonarworks calibration Archives better, but looking at the similarities, only a little boost from HzHz, and a little dip from HzHz

Above 2k the charts seem to be more different than similar, so either

1 - Sonarworks is not very useful
sonarworks calibration Archives - Innerfidelity has bad measurements.

Am I missing something?


Dannii

, PM

I was initially skeptical of Sonarworks sonarworks calibration Archives I decided to bite the bullet and try the demo of the full suite last month during their sale.

I'm no stranger to calibration techniques and had previously done my own measurements and calibrations of my studio monitors and was well pleased with sonarworks calibration Archives results. It was a big step up from no processing. That's part of the reason I was reluctant to try Sonarworks. I figured it wouldn't really offer much over what I'd already accomplished.

I was wrong! Very wrong! After running the Sonarworks demo, I was quite simply shocked at how well it works. It was the same step above my own calibration as that calibration was over uncalibrated. I purchased the full Reference 4 Studio Edition within MINUTES of setting up the demo!

It is now an essential part of my monitoring chain.


As for the headphone calibration, I recently purchased a pair of Beyerdynamic DT Pro headphones and absolutely love them!
I noticed that there is a calibration setup for that model in Sonarworks so I decided to try it out.
At first, sonarworks calibration Archives, I didn't like it. The whole EQ curve seemed to tilt everything in the direction of more lows and less highs and I thought it sounded dull by comparison. However, I did some objective analysis and compared the Sonarworks calibration of the s with the calibrated sound of my studio monitors and they are remarkably close. I decided to leave the Sonarworks calibration in my headphone monitoring chain and now I love what it does. It actually sounds very accurate and my mixes are translating well everywhere.

So, in summary, I'm a now a Sonarworks convert. It works extremely well.


vanhaze

, PM

Hi ReaDave, many thx for this valuable info !

I never heard of Sonarworks, now i am interested .!

I checked out their website for this product:
arenaqq.us

I use my Sennheiser HD headphones alot at home, to mix in Reaper.
Do you know how i can find out if this headphone is supported by Reference4 - Headphone Edition ?

Warm Regards !


JHughes

, PM

The Sonarworks Headphone EQ for my HDs sounded phasey to me, I couldn't take it. I don't want my monitoring chain to blur focus.


vanhaze

, PM

Mmmm. that sounds not good. thx for the info !


JHughes

, PM

NP, something to pay attention to during the demo period anyway. What I heard doesn't seem to bother many.


vanhaze

, PM

- Good to know i can run first a demo version, so i can try it out.
- Ahum, sonarworks calibration Archives, but i consider myself as a good longstanding soundengineer with excellent hearing for detail, so i am assuming i would hear the same phasey/washy issue as you describe.

Let's find out. :)


JHughes

, PM

I'm curious to read your results. :)


vanhaze

, PM

I'll keep ya posted, for sure !


vanhaze

, PM

Ok, so installed the demo.
Put Reference 4 Headphones plugin in Reaper's Monitor Chain.
A volume drop of about 6db so i had to compensate that with a gain plugin to level match it as good as possible when doing AB test.

Honestly i did AB for a minute or so and can't hear that much of a difference .
I don't really experience sonarworks calibration Archives phasey/washy sound when Reference 4 is enabled.
With the plugin enabled, the sound seems abit less "busy"as if details come alittle bit more to the front.
Hard to tell really, maybe my Sennheiser headphone is quite natural/accurate by itself already .


JHughes

, PM

Thanks for your report.

I must sonarworks calibration Archives though, when I say phasey, I don't mean phasing, so it's not like I heard any movement in the sound LOL. I just mean that the placement of instruments in the stereo field seemed a little less solid.

I forget if the software lets you choose between different EQ types, I seem to remember linear phase was used, sonarworks calibration Archives. I'll try again some day though.


Mr. PC

, PM

The Senn s and s are supposed to be pretty accurate, so that could be it.


Also, there should be no phase issues places on the master track. Linear phase could add some pre-ring, but using it at minimum phase really shouldn't make any difference; it's just an EQ curve, right?


Dannii

, AM

It is possible that if the response at the mix position is not compensated correctly for each channel that the image could end up smeared.
In my case though, Sonarworks fixed some minor imaging problems I had. My room is reasonably symmetrical but the roof is slightly lower on the right hand side, sonarworks calibration Archives. I also have different objects on each side of my mix position that slightly affect the response due to the very minor reflections they present.
One of the improvements Sonarworks made here was to compensate correctly for those differences. The resultant EQ curves are actually slightly different between channels which is exactly what I'd expect.


JHughes

, AM

The Senn s and s are supposed to be pretty accurate, so that could be it.


Also, there should be no phase issues places on the master track. Linear phase could add some pre-ring, but using it at minimum phase really shouldn't make any difference; it's just an EQ curve, sonarworks calibration Archives, right?Well, any EQ will change phase somehow, that's why you might use say a Baxendall in one place and a linear phase somewhere else.

If I had used the app on speakers rather than headphones maybe I wouldn't be able to hear the diff.

Also the most important thing is mix translation and that I did not test, whereas I'm sure Dave has.


Mr. PC

, AM

It is possible that if the response at the mix position is not compensated correctly for each channel that the image could end up smeared.
In my case though, Sonarworks fixed some minor imaging problems I had. My room is reasonably symmetrical but the roof is slightly lower on the right hand side. I also have different objects on each side of my mix position that slightly affect the response due to the very minor reflections they present, sonarworks calibration Archives.
One of the improvements Sonarworks sonarworks calibration Archives here was to compensate correctly for those differences. The resultant EQ curves are actually slightly different between channels which is exactly what I'd expect.

Oh, sonarworks calibration Archives, I didn't realize Sonarworks processed each channel separate. Is that true of the headphone plugin as well?

In this case linear phase I guess would be the best option. I would do a 'with' and 'without' Sonarworks monitor.


RedStone

, Sonarworks calibration Archives been using reference 3 (and now 4) for about a year now. I did notice what I think is a bit of crossfeed, which is where I think the reduction sonarworks calibration Archives width is coming from. This would be normal for listening on speakers, so I don't view it as a bad thing.

Listening in Mono is where you can really hear the difference. My Beyerdynamic cans have a horrible boost at 10khz. I can't listen to them for very long now without sonarworks calibration Archives enabled since I've noticed that boost.

The calibration for headphones won't be % accurate, as each set of headphones (Even of the same make) can be sonarworks calibration Archives different due to slight manufacturing inconsistencies. Plus there seems to be a breaking-in period for speakers and headphones, so response curves will change somewhat over time. I'm not sure if any of that is enough to worry about or not. I find the stock curves "good enough" when combined with some good cans as well as a calibrated speaker system in a calibrated room for reference.

I use reference in linear phase mode to avoid any phase problems, and I also use the 'avoid clipping' option since the plugin may be boosting some frequency ranges quite a bit in order to achieve a flat response (or a flatter response as the case may be). When A/Bing, I just turn off calibration from within the plugin, and the signal is allowed to pass through uncalibrated.

If you want to do a truer bypass, sonarworks calibration Archives, try using something like AB_LM so the before and after are precisely the same volume.


RedStone

, AM

To split the hairs a little more, to achieve a truly "flat" response you would also need to know the response curve of your ears. So imho there are no attainable absolutes here except for:


take care of your ears by not listening for long periods at decibels SPL above This includes on speakers or cans.
Find the sweet spot between what you've got now and significantly improved.
Chasing perfection is a fool's errand, sonarworks calibration Archives. Keep building on what you've got, and keep moving forward. Eventually you'll look back and realize you've come a really long way!
Physics always wins. Lack of knowledge about the physics of sound is a barrier to progress.


Most headphones at max volume have an SPL rating of over dB. This will begin to kill your ears in minutes! I did some testing on my macbook and found that at max volume, my sony headphones pump out DbSPL. That gives me about 30 seconds before damage occurs to my hearing. Keeping my Macbook volume at 1 'tick' below half way is the sweet spot for longer term listening (even then, it only gives me 2 hours max per day before sonarworks calibration Archives sets in).

Continuous exposures at and above 85dB SPL are considered hazardous by the CDC, sonarworks calibration Archives. And for every 3db SPL of change, that time gets either cut in half or doubled, sonarworks calibration Archives. So at 88dB, you get 4hours. At 91dB, you get 2 hours. at 94dB, 1 hr etc before damage can occur. Running most headphones even at 3/4 max volume will damage your hearing in less than 1 hour. Then that really screws up the search for "flat monitoring"


Dannii

, PM

I should add that I'm also using Sonarworks calibration Archives in linear phase mode except for when playing VST instruments (when I need the lowest latency).

Oh, I didn't realize Sonarworks processed each channel separate. Is that true of the headphone plugin as well?

In this case linear phase I guess would be the best option. I would do a 'with' and 'without' Sonarworks monitor.

Headphones should have the same EQ on both channels because they are not affected by the room. Speaker calibration does each speaker individually to improve channel balance and imaging due to room influence.


Dannii

, PM

Also the most important thing is sonarworks calibration Archives translation and that I did not test, whereas I'm sure Dave has.

Absolutely, sonarworks calibration Archives. This is a game changer in that regard too for me, sonarworks calibration Archives. I'm actually listening to my DTs through Sonarworks right now as I type this, sonarworks calibration Archives.
I've been A/Bing monitors vs headphones with Sonarworks on both and they are VERY close here which is a very good thing.

I've also set up an Ambisonic headphone decode chain using Blue Ripple, ATK and Sonarworks and I can get a reasonable 3D sound field happening with headphones which I'm quite happy about.


ericzang

, AM

I've also set up an Ambisonic headphone decode chain using Blue Ripple, ATK and Sonarworks and I can get a reasonable 3D sound field happening with headphones which I'm quite happy about.

Are you referring to what you describe in your thread (in your signature)? ReaDave Headphone Monitoring FX Chain and Track Template

Or something in addition to that? Sounds interesting!


metal_priest

, AM

i'm trying the demo in these days too (as I just moved to a new house and i'm setting up my arenaqq.usng some bass trap and schroeder diffusortake about this in another future topic if i will remember to take pics, it might be helpful for other people).

I'm impressed too about this software, and i'm wondering to buy it when the demo will be espired.

I make a very extreme test on my un-treated room, just the desk, some shells full of books nothing elsereally extreme.
And, what the f**k?
I couldn't believe to my arenaqq.us course nothing good to work with because the acoustic is too much bad right now, sonarworks calibration Archives, but i could work sonarworks calibration Archives a sonarworks calibration Archives of minor jobs without that annoying boomy soundif it was way better with this extreme situation, I really guess that once i'll be done with the treatment work it will be part of my monitoring chain for sure.

I didn't try with my MDR, i will let you know


Dannii

, PM

Are you referring to what you describe in your thread (in your signature)? ReaDave Headphone Monitoring FX Chain and Track Template

Or something in addition to that? Sounds interesting!

The version I am using which includes Sonarworks and Blue Ripple is a variation on the templates in that topic.


So I see some of you have used the demo to check your speakers and room out. Certainly they don't include a an acoustic measuring microphone with the demo, so how did you folks do this, with your own mics.

I've already got a good mic and don't want to purchase another. :)


Dannii

, PM

So I see some of you have used the demo to check your speakers and room out. Certainly they don't include a sonarworks calibration Archives acoustic measuring microphone with the demo, so how did you folks do this, sonarworks calibration Archives, with your own mics.

I've already got a good mic and don't want to purchase another. :)

I purchased this without the measurement mic. You can use any decent measurement mic with it and it allows you to import calibration files for your existing mic.
I used my Behri ECM with its calibration file and it worked really well.


Stella

, PM

I bought a cheap used ECM to demo it, then bought the Sonarworks mic with individual calibration after being impressed by the demo and sold the EMC for the same price I paid for it losing just a few quid on postage.

only an omnidirectional measurment mic will work.


I purchased this without the measurement mic. You can use any decent measurement mic with it and it allows you to import calibration files for your existing mic.
I used my Behri ECM with its calibration file and it worked really well.

Thanks Dave and Yeah, I've got the same mic. May I ask what you paid for Sonarworks?


Dannii

, PM

Thanks Dave and Yeah, I've got the same mic. May I ask what you paid for Sonarworks?

I got it at the end of last year during their half price sale.
Regarding the ECM, that is one of Behringer's early successes. I've had mine for around fifteen years and it has proven itself to be a great reference mic many times over in that period. Honestly, that mic is just as good as many others costing significantly more, especially when used with its calibration file.


Dannii

, PM

Thanks Dave and Yeah, sonarworks calibration Archives, I've got the same mic, sonarworks calibration Archives. May I ask what you paid for Sonarworks?

I forgot to mention that there are two reasons I didn't purchase their reference mic. One is that I doubt the results would be much different to the ECM and two is that if I purchased Sonarworks with the mic, I had no option to pay in US$. I could only pay in Euros and that made the overall price much higher. The Aussie to US dollar is MUCH better than Aussie dollar to Euros. I don't like the Euro very much!


Okay thanks Dave, I think I've seen the price for Sonarworks at about $, maybe if I could get it for half I would be interested, sonarworks calibration Archives. :)

Yeah, I've had my ECM for a little over a year, I've only used it twice, sonarworks calibration Archives, once to calibrate my control room and once just playing around experimenting with Reaper's monitor FX.

I checked all the various acoustic mics out there at the time I bought it and decided that regardless of the price it was plenty good enough. :)


Stella

, PM

They rejigged the way they sell it.
Now if you want speaker calibration you have to buy sonarworks calibration Archives complete bundle with headphones and systemwide.

Currently $ once in your cart at AudioDeluxe.

If you hold out for a sale maybe it will be less but I suspect no more half price sales as the bundle is already cheaper than the individual software would have beenalways check a third party site as they usually honour the sale price and add their own extra discounts on top.


They rejigged the way they sell it.
Now if you want speaker calibration you have to buy the complete bundle with headphones and systemwide.

Currently $ once in your cart at AudioDeluxe.

If you hold out for a sale maybe it will be less but I suspect no more half price sales as the bundle is already cheaper than the individual software would have beenalways check a third party site as they usually honour the sale price and add their own extra discounts on top.

Okay, thanks Stella, whats the deal with the demo, do they give you a certain amount of time, or is there another way they apply it.

I'm thinking I wouldn't want to demo it with out having enough time to do it in one shot. Or do they have a way of dealing with is so that you have plenty of time to see if it works?


Dannii

, AM

Okay, thanks Stella, whats the deal with sonarworks calibration Archives demo, do they give you a certain amount of time, or is there another way they apply it.

I'm thinking I wouldn't want to demo it with out having enough time to do sonarworks calibration Archives in one shot. Or do they have a way of dealing with is so that you have plenty of time to see if it works?

Demo sonarworks calibration Archives 21 days. It took me about 21 minutes to decide to make the purchase though!!!
arenaqq.us


Geoff Waddington

, AM

Yup, love the ECM, had one for about 10 ears, might be the best thing Behringer makes :)

As far as using linear phase EQ for compensation in order to avoid phase problems, be careful.

You could actually be CAUSING phase problems by using a linear phase EQ.

A single loudspeaker, a single diaphragm headphone earpiece for instance, is a "minimum phase" device.

Sonarworks calibration Archives has a rigorous engineering definition.

But what's really important is that as you correct a minimum phase device amplitude response, you ALSO correct the phase response, they are mathematically and sonically linked.

Minimum phase device has an evil twin called "excessive phase".

Excessive phase is commonly found in things like 2 way (or more) loudspeakers, rooms, etc.

Excessve phase has an electronic equivalent, an all pass filter.

Correcting the excessive phase component response sonarworks calibration Archives trickier.

As a VERY rough rule of thumb, in room acoustics the peaks tend to be minimum phase, the dips tend to be excessive phase.


Demo is 21 days, sonarworks calibration Archives. It took me about 21 minutes to decide to make the purchase though!!!
arenaqq.us

Okay, thanks again Dave, how did you get the profile for your ECM, my mic doesn't have a profile code, at least not one I can see? :)


Stella

, AM

The ECM don't come with a calibration but there is some generic calibration data available from various sources online and you can make your own file by pasting this into a text file and removing one of the columns.

arenaqq.us

Note I have seen someone who had their mic professionally calibrated say that the generic data was nothing like their data, so it may or may not be an improvement over using it without.


The ECM don't come with a calibration but there is some generic calibration data available from various sources online and you can make your own file by pasting this into a text file and removing one of the columns.

arenaqq.us

Note I have seen someone who had their mic professionally calibrated say that the generic data was nothing like their data, so it may or may not be an improvement over using it without.

Thanks again Stella, but I'm a little confused. They say this:

Open up this file with any text editor and remove anything that is not the values for Frequency Response and Magnitude.

But there is no file? Heh heh, oh well, as you indicate, it might not matter.


cyrano

, AM

The .cal file Behringer offers is for a first generation ECM That's the one with the Panasonic WM61a clone capsule produced in the Philippines. There are at least four other OEM's who have produced this mic for Behringer.


Stella

, PM

Thanks again Stella, but I'm a little confused. They say this:

But there is no file? Heh heh, oh well, as you indicate, it might not matter.

The file is at Behringer sitebut yeah, I don't think you can necessarily assume it will make things any better. this uncertainty was why I ended up just buying the Sonarowrks mic which has been individually calibrated by them.

arenaqq.us


The file is at Behringer sitebut yeah, I don't think you can necessarily assume it will make things any better. this uncertainty was why I ended up just buying the Sonarowrks mic which has been individually calibrated by them.

arenaqq.us

Okay thanks Stella, I created a text file that should work, it's based on the link you provided. If anybody else wants it you can DL it here.

arenaqq.us%%arenaqq.us


Dannii

, PM

The .cal file Behringer offers is for a first generation ECM That's the one with the Panasonic WM61a clone capsule produced in the Philippines, sonarworks calibration Archives. There are at least four other OEM's who have produced this mic for Behringer.

I didn't know they used capsules with the same specs as the WM61a. My ECM is one of the early production runs that the cal file was written for.
I have a bunch sonarworks calibration Archives WM61a capsules here which I'm using to build custom PZM's. Their response isn't the same as the ECM file suggests. Perhaps the clones Behri used have a different response to the Panasonic capsules.


Triode

, PM

Hi Folks

I'm just trying Sonarworks out with my monitors.
When the Sonarworks plugin is used in the monitor FX chain in reaper it doesn't function (there's no level showing in the plugin metering). When I put it on the master bus it works. Have any of you got it working in the monitor FX chain and was there a trick to that?

Cheers


Hi Folks

I'm just trying Sonarworks out with my sonarworks calibration Archives.
When the Sonarworks plugin is used in the monitor FX chain in reaper it doesn't function (there's no level showing in the plugin metering). When I put it on the master bus it works. Have any of you got it working in the monitor FX chain and was there a trick to that?

Cheers

Hi Triode, yes I do have it in my "Monitor" FX, it's working very nicely. Sonarworks calibration Archives also got it working well outside of Sonarworks calibration Archives using "Systemwide", another Sonarworks plugin.

It's been a while so I don't recall the exact procedures.


Triode

, AM

Thanks Tod, sonarworks calibration Archives.

It was the pin thing. My interface outs are number 17 and I needed to open the pin dialog and click on the plus sign and add the relevant pins. Stumped me before and I forgot it was necessary for every plugin there.

I set Sonarworks up last night using a U87 and even though I imported a general calibration file I'm not sold yet listening to various frequencies on an oscillator. I think the mic that comes with the software might be necessary. Hmmn


RedStone

, PM

Yes you need to use a proper calibration microphone with a calibration file to set up sonarworks for using it for monitoring with speakers.


I set Sonarworks up last night using a U87 and even though I imported a general calibration file I'm not sold yet listening to various frequencies on an oscillator. I think the mic that comes with the software might be necessary. Hmmn

I've got a Behringer ECM acoustic measurement microphone. I got it at Sweetwater, I see they're about $60 right now. I've noticed quite a few other people have it and I think it's okay for this.

I also see the Sonarworks microphone is about $70 right now.

I think there's a calibration file out there for the ECM, but I measured without it and got reasonable results.


Stella

, AM

I think there's a calibration file out there for the ECM, but I measured without it and got reasonable results.

Well it's not so much out there as right here you posted yours last year after being pointed at the data! It's just a bit further up the thread.
The problems with it are also discussed.


Well it's not so much out there as right here you posted yours last year after being pointed at the data! It's just a bit further up the thread.
The problems with it are also discussed.

Thanks Stella, yeah but I wonder sonarworks calibration Archives there isn't something more recent?


Dannii

, AM

The cal file I used for my ECM is the one linked to earlier in this thread. It works perfectly here.


Stella

, AM

Thanks Stella, sonarworks calibration Archives, yeah but I wonder if there isn't something more recent?

The data you created it from has not been updated since so I guess still considered current by Behringer.

arenaqq.us

Howeverthis statement pretty much sums up my own concerns and the reason I went for the xref20 in the end.

arenaqq.us


Howeverthis statement pretty much sums up my own concerns and the reason I went for the xref20 in the end.

arenaqq.us

Aah, I hadn't seen that before, it looks like that was published in

When I got mine I went over it pretty thoroughly with Sweetwater regarding how well they worked. I'm sure they were tempted to sell me a more expensive mic, sonarworks calibration Archives, but when I pressed them, they assured me the ECM would do the job.

The only problem I've had is the mic clip broke, but I've got a lot of assorted mic clips, so it's no problem.


dub

, PM

Just a note to say that I also use Sonarworks in a room with a fair bit of treatment (full-height traps, diffusers) and it made a great, measurable difference.

Only complaint is something I have already requested as a feature - the tray icon needs to indicate if it is in speaker or headphone mode. A few times I've been wondering why everything sounds awful before realising I have headphone correction mode on while monitoring through speakers. But otherwise, it's great.


Dannii

, PM

Howeverthis statement pretty much sums up my own concerns and the reason I went for the xref20 in the end.

arenaqq.us

Hmm. Very interesting. It seems the ECM is somewhat of an anomaly for Behringer. As a general rule, their quality has improved by leaps and bounds of recent years. However, the early ECM mics have proven to be very reliable. If the new ones are not up to par, that goes against the grain for Behringer.
As far as I can tell, my ECM still works as good as the day I got it back at the start of the s.


cyrano

, Sonarworks calibration Archives afraid it's true, Dave.

The first generation ECM had WM61a capsules and a transformer.

The second generation ECM had WM61a capsules and no transformer.

The third generation ECM had clone capsules, made in the Philippines.

The fourth generation ECM had clone capsules, made in the Philippines and an SMD board.

Apparently, there's a fifth sonarworks calibration Archives now. And problems with consistent electret quality.

Besides, there's a design error in all of them. It's not a balanced mic, because of a wiring error. Correcting that yields a 6 dB higher signal output.

Atm, look at the Mini-DSP UMIK

arenaqq.us

And, yes, it's a USB mic. BUT it's individually calibrated! and it's only 75$.


Dannii

, AM

Thanks Cyrano. You learn something every day so they say.
I'll have to open mine up and check out which version it is. I'm going to guess it is a WM61a model without transformer. It came with the Ultracurve which I mostly use as a spectrum analyzer these days.


cyrano

, PM

Seems like a good guess, Dave. I never could lay my greasy hands on one of the transformer ones. Seems these are rare. I do have one of all the other generations. Only one used sonarworks calibration Archives acoustic measurement. The others are noise pickups, used for testing cabling and shielding. Gostbusters :D


karbomusic

, PM

I'm going to guess it is a WM61a model without transformer.

I just cracked one of mine open (I have 2), they are sonarworks calibration Archives and no transformer so I wonder when they had transformers. Reg panasonic capsules, it looks like WM6x but not exactly so not sure if they ever actually had these. I may take the capsule out to look closer but it is glued in; I'd be tempted to say its a WM6x knockoff. Nice enclosures though, I really should take a couple of those WM61a's we bought in sonarworks calibration Archives, build new preamps and just rebuild both of them and rebrand as "the karbo". :D


cyrano

, PM

Getting the capsule out unharmed is next to impossible

And here's a pic of the transformer one:

arenaqq.us


Getting the capsule out unharmed is next to impossible

And here's a pic of the transformer one:

arenaqq.us

That's got a totally different looking case, were they that different back then?

I'm totally stuck with mine unless I want to buy another one, but I'm happy with what I ended up with for my room using Sonarworks.

I only shot the room once with Sonarworks, so when I have some time I'm going to do it again to see what happens. :)


karbomusic

, PM

Getting the capsule out unharmed is next to impossible

And here's a pic of the transformer one:



Thanks for sonarworks calibration Archives pic, sonarworks calibration Archives. I got it out without much issue. It's bigger than the WM61a. ECM on the right

arenaqq.us

The pre

arenaqq.us


cyrano

, PM

That's got a totally different looking case, were they that different back then?

I'm totally stuck with mine unless I want to buy another one, but I'm happy with what I ended up with for my room using Sonarworks.

I only shot the room once with Sonarworks calibration Archives, so when I have some time I'm going to do it again to see what happens. :)

I only can see a different screw

Mine aren't all the same either. But the differences are minor. Different grille, different screws, XLR's.

Behringer used different OEM's over time for these. The only one I'm sure of, is Phonic, sonarworks calibration Archives Taiwan. One of my broken ECM's states "Made in the Phillipines".

The latest one (since ) seems to use the same OEM as the Dayton measurement mic. It's Ohms, the older ones all are Sonarworks calibration Archives, PM

Thanks for the pic. I got it out without much issue. It's bigger than the WM61a. ECM on the right

Well, congrats! I never managed to get one out without heating it.

Since yours still has through-hole components, it's one of the earlier. 3rd generation in my list?

And even WM61's aren't too sure. They're still available from reputed sources, but a lot of "fake" ones are around. Maybe even Panasonic made several revisions?

But my list is based on what I've seen. Probably there have been other ECM versions in other markets, or at other moments. These four are the ones I've seen over the years and by dissecting the defective ones I've been given.

The info about the latest one () comes from a GS thread:

arenaqq.us


karbomusic

, PM

Well, congrats! I never managed to get one out without heating it.


Very judicious use of acetone on a Q-Tip.


cyrano

, AM

Very judicious use of acetone on a Q-Tip.

Never tried that. Doesn't acetone damage the capsule?

I mean, acetone vapor is enough to make 3D prints shiny, isn't it?


karbomusic

, AM

Never tried that. Doesn't acetone damage the capsule?

I mean, acetone vapor is enough to make 3D prints shiny, isn't it?

It should be OK unless made of something like ABS but I was careful not to soak the element side. I'll test when I put it back in to make sure it still works.


akademie

, AM

Any way to determine "version" of Behringer ECM microphone without disassembling/breaking it?
For which of them will the supplied calibration data work?

I have two ECM that I want to use to measure my room. They were bought second hand at different times. One of them has CHINA inside the XLR connector, the another one does not :)


cyrano

, AM

Any way to determine "version" of Behringer ECM microphone without disassembling/breaking it?

Nope. AFAIK there's no way. Too many different versions.

For which of them will the supplied calibration data work?

The .cal file is generic. It doesn't apply much calibration, except in the low end.

As these are electret capsules, sonarworks calibration Archives, getting older will probably yield more difference than the individual versions. All the capsules in these are omni and reasonably flat.

And as long as your measurements are relative to other measurements you make with the same mic, it doesn't matter that much.

I have two ECM that I want to use to measure my room. They were bought second hand at different times. One of them has CHINA inside the XLR connector, the another one does not :)

If you start hearing a lot of hiss, they are ripe for replacement.


akademie

, AM

Thanks cyrano,
will do some measurement in spare time and compare those two mics to see what's up.


I ran into this problem of latency and I couldn't figure out why.

I had a client in for the last few days, and every time he tried to play his guitar or sing, there was way to much
latency so I had to use direct monitoring. I just didn't have time to stop and figure out what the problem was.

Then today I sonarworks calibration Archives to thinking maybe it's the Sonarworks plugin in the monitor FX, and sure enough, when I turned it
off today the latency went away. Ha ha, I can't believe I didn't figure that out sooner. So I decided to see if
I could set up ReaEQ to mimic Sonarworks.

I set up the tracks and FX like this.

Trk JS White Noise generator (White Noise has less distortion then Pink Noise)
Trk Sonarworks
Trk 2 ReaEQ plugins
Trk Span

Trk-1 is routed to both Trk-2 & Trk-3 while Trk-2 & Trk-3 are rounted to Trk
Trk-2 is sending both left & right to Trk
Trk-3 one ReaEQ goes out left using Pin-1, while the other ReaEQ goes out right using Pin

Span is setup for both Trk-2 & Trk-3, with (Range Lo = )(Range Hi = )(Slope = 0) and a Smoothing of 1/6 Oct.

First I panned Trk-1 full left and setup the left ReaEQ, then The Sims 4: Como acessar a Galeria Online Trk-1 full right and setup the right ReaEQ.

When I got done, I grouped the "Mutes" on sonarworks calibration Archives Trk2 & Trk3, loaded a reference song and routed it to both Trk-2 & Trk3.

While playing the reference I flipped back and forth between Sonarworks sonarworks calibration Archives ReaEQ. They sounded very very similar, ReaEQ
had slightly more in the mid range and Sonarworks had slightly more in the low end.

However, Sonarworks sounded somewhat tight in a way that I could both feel it and hear it. After testing for quite awhile
using other reference songs, sonarworks calibration Archives, I decided I definitely like ReaEQ better. Also I added another stereo ReaEQ and added about
dB of Low Shelving at hz to make up for the lower bottom end.

So I added my ReaEQs to the monitor mix and bypassed Sonarworks. I'm really liking it and the latency is gone. :)


Triode

, PM

Sonarworks does have a zero latency mode, sonarworks calibration Archives. Did you try that too?


Sonarworks does have a zero latency mode. Did you try that too?

Yeah I know, but somewhere I read that Linear Phase was better so that's where I set it and forgot about it.

So to be honest, I did sonarworks calibration Archives about that, so thanks Triode. But I still think I like the ReaEQ better. Ha ha, maybe there was a reason I forgot about the Zero Latency thingy. :)


acintya

, AM

I was initially skeptical of Sonarworks but I decided to bite the bullet and try the demo of the full suite last month during their sale.

I'm no stranger to calibration techniques and had previously done my own measurements and calibrations of my studio monitors and was well pleased with the results. It was a big step up from no processing. That's part of the reason I was reluctant to try Sonarworks. I figured it wouldn't really offer much over what I'd already accomplished.

I sonarworks calibration Archives wrong! Very wrong! After running the Sonarworks demo, I was quite simply shocked at how well it works. It was the same step above my own calibration as that calibration was over uncalibrated. I purchased the full Reference 4 Studio Edition within MINUTES of setting up the demo!

It is now an essential part of my monitoring chain.


As for the headphone calibration, I recently purchased a pair of Beyerdynamic DT Pro headphones and absolutely love sonarworks calibration Archives
I noticed that there is a calibration setup for that model in Sonarworks so I decided to try it out.
At first, I didn't like it. The whole EQ curve seemed to tilt everything in the sonarworks calibration Archives of more lows and less highs and I thought it sounded dull by comparison. However, I did some objective analysis and compared the Sonarworks calibration of the s with the calibrated sound of my studio monitors and they are remarkably close. I decided to leave the Sonarworks calibration in my headphone monitoring chain and now I love what it does, sonarworks calibration Archives. It actually sounds very accurate and my sonarworks calibration Archives are translating well everywhere.

So, in summary, I'm a now a Sonarworks convert. It works extremely well.

great story!! I bought pre-calibrated hds and I cant explain enough how clear are they now - one of the most flat headphones available but when you turn sonarworks on it you experience a whole new level of monitoring.


Dannii

, AM

great story!! I bought pre-calibrated hds and I cant explain enough how clear are they now - one of the most flat headphones available but when you turn sonarworks on it you experience a whole new level of monitoring.

If I didn't end up with the Beyers, I probably would've sonarworks calibration Archives with HDs as well. A good friend who is also fellow musician/engineer has a pair and they are great headphones.

I'll be trying out some experiments using Sonarworks for live engineering use soon. I'm currently putting together a new live rig based on REAPER, an RME Fireface UFX and some Neve clone preamps and am planning to use a few instances of Sonarworks on busses and sends sonarworks calibration Archives calibrate both vocal mics and FOH/FB speakers. I'll obviously be using it in zero latency mode which is also the mode I'm running in my studio. I switched to that a few months back and haven't noticed anything detrimental. In fact, if anything, I prefer the sound of that mode.


acintya

, AM

If I didn't end up with the Beyers, I probably would've gone with HDs as well. A good friend who is also fellow musician/engineer has a pair and they are great headphones.

I'll be trying out some experiments using Sonarworks for live engineering use soon, sonarworks calibration Archives. I'm currently putting together a new live rig based on REAPER, an RME Fireface UFX and some Neve clone preamps and am planning to use a few instances of Sonarworks on busses and sends to calibrate both vocal mics and FOH/FB speakers. I'll obviously be using it in zero latency mode which is also the mode I'm running in my studio. I switched to that a few months back and haven't noticed anything detrimental. In fact, if anything, I prefer the sound of that mode.

interesting idea!with you luck man. im a newbie in this area,but i have no idea how i managed to mixdown all my tracks until now without sonarworks - it was false audio image all the way.
my sony headphones also are a lot more clear with this software,not to speak about my yamaha hs80 - now they are really FLAT.
adobe dreamweaver cs4 free download Archives - Patch Cracks the mixes translate superb between the sennheisers and yamahas. i think i will not turn off this software ever:)
its not about beeing flat, its also that somehow the audio is more clear you can hear different frequencies better - cant explain.

good luck with the projects!


arenaqq.us

, PM

this signal:

arenaqq.us (arenaqq.us)arenaqq.us (arenaqq.us)


after applying the headphone profile for the DT pro:

arenaqq.us (arenaqq.us)arenaqq.us (arenaqq.us)


zero latency:

arenaqq.us (arenaqq.us)arenaqq.us (arenaqq.us)

The result of the correction is the addition of ringing, loss of space.


JHughes

, AM

The result of the correction is the addition of ringing, loss of arenaqq.us's exactly what I hear too. I trialed Sonarworks but found the downsides outweighed the pluses.


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